IBM: 1100100 and counting | The Economist
The secret of Big Blue’s longevity has less to do with machines or software than with strong customer relationships
THE long passage that connects the two wings of IBM’s headquarters in  Armonk gives a new meaning to the expression “a walk down memory lane”.  From punch cards to magnetic tapes and disk drives to memory chips,  every means of storing information since the advent of modern  calculating machines is on display, either as an exhibit or as a photo.  Other relics of computing can be found in the building, an hour’s drive  north of New York City. Near the boardroom sits a desk-sized calculator  with hundreds of knobs. Visitors can also wonder about a tangle of wires  connected to a metal plate—an early form of software called a “control  panel”.
No other information technology (IT) company could boast such a  collection and also claim to have built each of the items on display.  The history of computing cannot be conceived without IBM, which  celebrates its 100th birthday on June 16th. Remarkably, even though to  many minds Big Blue, like the objects on show at Armonk, is a relic of  the 20th century, the firm remains one of the IT industry’s leaders. Its  market capitalisation again almost matches that of Microsoft, its  archrival for many years (see chart 1).
The firm’s centenary is an occasion to reflect on many things  digital, but one question stands out: why is IBM still alive and  thriving after so long, in an industry characterised perhaps more than  any other by innovation and change? This is not just of interest to  business historians. As IBM enters its second century in good health,  far younger IT giants, such as Cisco Systems, Intel, Microsoft and  Nokia, are grappling with market shifts that threaten to make them much  less relevant.

IBM: 1100100 and counting | The Economist

The secret of Big Blue’s longevity has less to do with machines or software than with strong customer relationships

THE long passage that connects the two wings of IBM’s headquarters in Armonk gives a new meaning to the expression “a walk down memory lane”. From punch cards to magnetic tapes and disk drives to memory chips, every means of storing information since the advent of modern calculating machines is on display, either as an exhibit or as a photo. Other relics of computing can be found in the building, an hour’s drive north of New York City. Near the boardroom sits a desk-sized calculator with hundreds of knobs. Visitors can also wonder about a tangle of wires connected to a metal plate—an early form of software called a “control panel”.

No other information technology (IT) company could boast such a collection and also claim to have built each of the items on display. The history of computing cannot be conceived without IBM, which celebrates its 100th birthday on June 16th. Remarkably, even though to many minds Big Blue, like the objects on show at Armonk, is a relic of the 20th century, the firm remains one of the IT industry’s leaders. Its market capitalisation again almost matches that of Microsoft, its archrival for many years (see chart 1).

The firm’s centenary is an occasion to reflect on many things digital, but one question stands out: why is IBM still alive and thriving after so long, in an industry characterised perhaps more than any other by innovation and change? This is not just of interest to business historians. As IBM enters its second century in good health, far younger IT giants, such as Cisco Systems, Intel, Microsoft and Nokia, are grappling with market shifts that threaten to make them much less relevant.

Former IBM chairman Thomas Watson, Jr. knew how important it was to work with people who question the way things are and challenge the status quo. In fact, he even had a name for them. “Wild Ducks” is a film about four IBM clients whose questioning minds and unconventional ideas are transforming our world. See and hear their inspirational stories. For more information, please visit www.ibm100.com (http://www.ibm.com/ibm100/us/en/)


IBM Centennial Day of Service by the numbers Infographic:
300,000 global volunteers
120 countries impacted
5000 service projects
2.5 Million hours of service (that’s about 850 years!)
I spent my afternoon helping the hungry. A few hundred of my IBM colleagues and I packaged meals at the RTP campus. Our goal: package 100 thousand meals to help those in need through Stop Hunger Now. We packaged our 50K meals in about 86 minutes. 50K meals were prepared on the AM shift. More on this, plus photos and videos in a new blog post later… 

via secondaryartifacts:
(N.B. I’ve been developing a Ning Network — Tuscaloosa:Together — to help that Alabama community recover from the devastating tornado this spring. Will be working with Univ. of Alabama students to take it over and build the recovery community… Jack Mason)

IBM Centennial Day of Service by the numbers Infographic:

  • 300,000 global volunteers
  • 120 countries impacted
  • 5000 service projects
  • 2.5 Million hours of service (that’s about 850 years!)

I spent my afternoon helping the hungry. A few hundred of my IBM colleagues and I packaged meals at the RTP campus. Our goal: package 100 thousand meals to help those in need through Stop Hunger Now. We packaged our 50K meals in about 86 minutes. 50K meals were prepared on the AM shift. More on this, plus photos and videos in a new blog post later… 

via secondaryartifacts:

(N.B. I’ve been developing a Ning Network — Tuscaloosa:Together — to help that Alabama community recover from the devastating tornado this spring. Will be working with Univ. of Alabama students to take it over and build the recovery community… Jack Mason)

IBM’s Toronto Innovation Centre Workshops on Social Media, Collaboration and User Experience

As part of the centennial celebrations, IBM’s Toronto Innovation Centre invited local non-profit agencies to participate in learning and mentoring sessions. Open Doors was designed to educate senior level non-profit professionals in the use of online tools to drive community and volunteer engagement.

Watch the sessions on the IBM GBS Livestream Channel

In session 1, Richard Smallbone & Karen Maxwell discuss how to design an experience for users — including strategies, tools, and technologies that can help you communicate your message more effectively.

In session 2, Bernie Michalik reviews the tools and approaches that non-profit and other organizations are using, how the tools and approaches add value to those organizations, and the steps for applying social media tools and approaches in your organization.

In session 3, Jennifer Nolan discusses some of the free and low-cost on-line tools that are available to help you collaborate between your employees, partners investors, volunteers. Examples are provided on how IBM has developed custom applications for nonprofit organizations to support their goals through collaboration.

Making the World Work Better | The Ideas that Shaped a Century and a Company
In Making the World Work Better: The Ideas That Shaped a Century and a Company,  slated for release in June 2011, journalists Kevin Maney, Steve Hamm  and Jeffrey M. O’Brien examine how IBM has contributed to the evolution  of technology and the modern corporation over the past 100 years.

Making the World Work Better | The Ideas that Shaped a Century and a Company

In Making the World Work Better: The Ideas That Shaped a Century and a Company, slated for release in June 2011, journalists Kevin Maney, Steve Hamm and Jeffrey M. O’Brien examine how IBM has contributed to the evolution of technology and the modern corporation over the past 100 years.

IBMers  from the Toronto Innovation Centre  are  inviting non-profit agencies  to participate in learning sessions  this  Thursday May 19th.
Open Doors is designed to educate senior level non-profit professionals in the use    of online tools to drive community and volunteer engagement. Expert    IBMers will share their knowledge and skills in Social Media,    Collaboration and User Experience consulting.
Watch the sessions live on the IBM GBS Channel.
Session 1: User Experience (9:00 to 10:00 am)
Session 2: Social Media (10:15 to 11:15 am)
Session 3: Collaboration (11:30 to 12:30 am)

IBMers from the Toronto Innovation Centre are inviting non-profit agencies to participate in learning sessions this Thursday May 19th.

Open Doors is designed to educate senior level non-profit professionals in the use of online tools to drive community and volunteer engagement. Expert IBMers will share their knowledge and skills in Social Media, Collaboration and User Experience consulting.

Watch the sessions live on the IBM GBS Channel.

Session 1: User Experience (9:00 to 10:00 am)

Session 2: Social Media (10:15 to 11:15 am)

Session 3: Collaboration (11:30 to 12:30 am)

IBM WebSphere: An Icon of Progress (by ibm)

IBM WebSphere, created by a small team in 1998, has developed into a key driver of IBM’s growth over the past decade and is now used by more than 100,000 companies around the world. Today, the WebSphere line encompasses almost all areas of business: application integration, business process management, and e-commerce, just to name a few.

IBM Centennial: Icons of Progress 3D Gallery on the IBM Global Business Services Virtual Center
Visit our new and improved 3D meeting space, which now includes graphics from the Icons of Progress program featuring 100 key stories about innovations at IBM over the last century. Each graphic will open a tab browser to the respective story on http://www.ibm100.com.
The Virtual Center is an easy-to-use, web-based and voice enabled venue for 3D meetings, discussions, presentations and other kinds of events. We will be organizing receptions for the 3D Icons of Progress Gallery soon, but in the meantime you are welcome to visit anytime.

IBM Centennial: Icons of Progress 3D Gallery on the IBM Global Business Services Virtual Center

Visit our new and improved 3D meeting space, which now includes graphics from the Icons of Progress program featuring 100 key stories about innovations at IBM over the last century. Each graphic will open a tab browser to the respective story on http://www.ibm100.com.

The Virtual Center is an easy-to-use, web-based and voice enabled venue for 3D meetings, discussions, presentations and other kinds of events. We will be organizing receptions for the 3D Icons of Progress Gallery soon, but in the meantime you are welcome to visit anytime.

web.alive Basic Navigation

Here’s a nice overview of the virtual experience for web.alive, the 3D platform that the Virtual Center | IBM Global Business Services runs on.

This easy-to-use, web based and voice enabled meeting space is available for IBMers and others to collaborate. 

Check out the new 3D Gallery for our the Icons of Progress project, a central part of the IBM Centennial celebration in 2011

IBM100 - Excimer Laser Surgery

In 1980, three IBM scientists—Rangaswamy Srinivasan, James Wynne and Samuel Blum—discovered how the newly invented excimer laser could remove specific human tissue without harming the surrounding area and do so on an extremely minute scale—a process that became the foundation for LASIK and PRK surgery. The painless procedure, which changes the shape of the cornea, has improved the vision and quality of life for millions of people around the world.
Explore this Icon of Progress

IBM100 - Excimer Laser Surgery

In 1980, three IBM scientists—Rangaswamy Srinivasan, James Wynne and Samuel Blum—discovered how the newly invented excimer laser could remove specific human tissue without harming the surrounding area and do so on an extremely minute scale—a process that became the foundation for LASIK and PRK surgery. The painless procedure, which changes the shape of the cornea, has improved the vision and quality of life for millions of people around the world.

Explore this Icon of Progress

Viral Video: IBM Turns 100
Source: All Things Digital, WSJ

Here is a very clever video by IBM for its centennial birthday in June, using 100 people representing every year of innovations in its existence.
For those unfamiliar, the famed tech company was incredibly fast-forward on a lot of social issues, including women and racial integration in the workplace.
Oh, yes, and those computers.
While the company it is now and the company it was then are very different, International Business Machines Corp. still deserves kudos for all it has given to the tech industry.
And, of course, for its perfect motto: Think.
In these noisy days, it’s still a pretty terrific idea to keep in mind.
Here’s a link to the video:

Viral Video: IBM Turns 100

Source: All Things Digital, WSJ

Here is a very clever video by IBM for its centennial birthday in June, using 100 people representing every year of innovations in its existence.

For those unfamiliar, the famed tech company was incredibly fast-forward on a lot of social issues, including women and racial integration in the workplace.

Oh, yes, and those computers.

While the company it is now and the company it was then are very different, International Business Machines Corp. still deserves kudos for all it has given to the tech industry.

And, of course, for its perfect motto: Think.

In these noisy days, it’s still a pretty terrific idea to keep in mind.

Here’s a link to the video: