To Change A Company, You Need Intrapreneurs | Co.Exist

It can be hard to get a big, slow company to change its ways. It’s the efforts of courageous intrapreneurs that can change their trajectory. The key is to make your company a place where intrapreneurs can thrive.

Multinational corporations aren’t always known for their agility. Organizational change, product evolution, or rebranding—just some of the many ways in which a business has the potential to flex and move—can be laborious undertakings for companies with millions of stakeholders spread far and wide around the world.

But lately, leading companies are taking a page from the startup book and are beginning to leverage entrepreneurial approaches to drive business value. Dubbed “intrapreneurship” by early adopters, this trend highlights the value of people—the “intrapreneurs”—working from within a company who are accelerating change while continuing to drive business benefits. Economic constraints are forcing even large, established companies to act in a manner akin to the startup phase of much younger organizations; they’re leveraging the creativity and passion of their people to become more dynamic, more innovative, and more agile.

With the Fire, as with its its whizzy-gizmo predecessors, the iPad and the Nook Color, we are seeing the e-book begin to assume its true aesthetic, which would seem to be far closer to the aesthetic of the web than to that of the printed page: text embedded in a welter of functions and features, a symphony of intrusive beeps. Even the more restrained Kindle Touch, also introduced today, comes with a feature called X-Ray that seems designed to ensure that a book’s words never gain too tight a grip over a reader’s consciousness: “With a single tap, readers can see all the passages across a book that mention ideas, fictional characters, historical figures, places or topics that interest them, as well as more detailed descriptions from Wikipedia and Shelfari, Amazon’s community-powered encyclopedia for book lovers.” The original Kindle, now discounted to $79, is beginning to look like a dusty relic - something for the rocking-chair set.

 Why Can’t America Make Alternative Fuels Work? – Gas 2.0
60 years ago, there didn’t seem to be a single challenge America  couldn’t overcome. Now, there’s just a lot of negativity about America,  especially when it comes to alternative fuels. What are these people so  afraid of?
In particular, I’m talking about how in the same breath a person can criticize Big Oil for rising gas prices,  and then start talking trash about any kind of alternative to gasoline  for fuel. It makes no sense to me that we, as Americans, should have  nearly infinite options when it comes to buying just about anything you can imagine, except fuel for our cars. That’s all I really want. Options. I want a  gas station that sells more than gas. I want CNG, I want propane, I want  different ethanol blends, and I want charging stations that are built  by a combination of private and public investment. Is that really asking  so much?
For some people, it apparently is. It’s as though we’re afraid of  messing with the formula that has made America the most effective  economic giant in the world for the last century or so. Make no mistake  about it, putting cars into the hands of the common people radically  altered the human dynamic. No longer were people confined to the towns  where they were born, or reliant upon massive railroads who dictated  where tracks were or weren’t laid.
If I had to pick one symbol for America in the 20th century, it’d have to be the Ford Model T. For thousands and thousands  of years, the fastest mode of overland travel was the horse, which like  humans required lots of food and lots of rest. But with the advent of  the automobile, people now had a source of mobility that could take  farther and faster than even the swiftest thoroughbred, and required  only a few gallons  of a seemingly inexhaustible source of fuel.
But we’re in the 21st century now. America may no longer  be the world’s most prolific economy in as little as 5 years. There are  many billions more people in the world today than there were 60 years  ago. And there people are starting to get their hands on automobiles  too, changing the dynamics of their lives as well. The world is  changing, and if America wants to stay on top, we need to be the  innovators in the 21st century that we were in the 20th century.
The problem is, there aren’t a whole lot of things left that we can  take the lead in, and not everything we’re first in is exactly  admirable. So why would anyone believe that, at a time when the entirety of the rest of the world is leaning towards renewable fuels, would we want to in the other  direction? If Europe and China want solar panels and electric cars and  wind turbines, well they should buy it from America. That’s a surefire  way to get our economy back on track, and the oil companies called  before Congress this week have the knowledge and resources to make it  happen. So why don’t they?
We’re afraid. We don’t want to mess with success. Oil is cheap and  abundant, except its not anymore, and we’re afraid that our lives our  going to be lesser for it. So we want to drill for more oil and build  bigger highways to we can sit in longer traffic jams and pay ever more  for gasoline, because there really is no other option?

Why Can’t America Make Alternative Fuels Work? – Gas 2.0

60 years ago, there didn’t seem to be a single challenge America couldn’t overcome. Now, there’s just a lot of negativity about America, especially when it comes to alternative fuels. What are these people so afraid of?

In particular, I’m talking about how in the same breath a person can criticize Big Oil for rising gas prices, and then start talking trash about any kind of alternative to gasoline for fuel. It makes no sense to me that we, as Americans, should have nearly infinite options when it comes to buying just about anything you can imagine, except fuel for our cars. That’s all I really want. Options. I want a gas station that sells more than gas. I want CNG, I want propane, I want different ethanol blends, and I want charging stations that are built by a combination of private and public investment. Is that really asking so much?

For some people, it apparently is. It’s as though we’re afraid of messing with the formula that has made America the most effective economic giant in the world for the last century or so. Make no mistake about it, putting cars into the hands of the common people radically altered the human dynamic. No longer were people confined to the towns where they were born, or reliant upon massive railroads who dictated where tracks were or weren’t laid.

If I had to pick one symbol for America in the 20th century, it’d have to be the Ford Model T. For thousands and thousands of years, the fastest mode of overland travel was the horse, which like humans required lots of food and lots of rest. But with the advent of the automobile, people now had a source of mobility that could take farther and faster than even the swiftest thoroughbred, and required only a few gallons  of a seemingly inexhaustible source of fuel.

But we’re in the 21st century now. America may no longer be the world’s most prolific economy in as little as 5 years. There are many billions more people in the world today than there were 60 years ago. And there people are starting to get their hands on automobiles too, changing the dynamics of their lives as well. The world is changing, and if America wants to stay on top, we need to be the innovators in the 21st century that we were in the 20th century.

The problem is, there aren’t a whole lot of things left that we can take the lead in, and not everything we’re first in is exactly admirable. So why would anyone believe that, at a time when the entirety of the rest of the world is leaning towards renewable fuels, would we want to in the other direction? If Europe and China want solar panels and electric cars and wind turbines, well they should buy it from America. That’s a surefire way to get our economy back on track, and the oil companies called before Congress this week have the knowledge and resources to make it happen. So why don’t they?

We’re afraid. We don’t want to mess with success. Oil is cheap and abundant, except its not anymore, and we’re afraid that our lives our going to be lesser for it. So we want to drill for more oil and build bigger highways to we can sit in longer traffic jams and pay ever more for gasoline, because there really is no other option?


“‘Wasteland’ isn’t just a movie about recycling. The film touches on the transformative power of looking at life a little differently. To change your perspective and learn more about the film, watch the trailer here.”
doitdoitdoitnow:

“‘Wasteland’ isn’t just a movie about recycling. The film touches on the transformative power of looking at life a little differently. To change your perspective and learn more about the film, watch the trailer here.”

doitdoitdoitnow:

(via thegreenurbanist)

Social Business Design | Dachis Group

Challenges to Organizational Transformation

Legacy Structures

New trends, no matter how revolutionary, must still overcome the limitations of the past before becoming fully adopted. In organizations, legacy systems and platforms, cultural elements, and governance requirements all work to limit the willingness to experiment and innovate.

  • Information Should Empower: Increased openness and better communication can empower employees of an organization and directly improve results, but managers still fight to retain control. When replicated across a business, this develops into an organizational inertia that can stymie growth.
  • The IT / Marketing Disconnect: IT controls the technology infrastructure used to deploy and manage organizational information. Marketing manages the external communications that rely on said infrastructure. Yet these two organizations are often forced to compete for headcount and resources, reducing the ability and willingness to collaborate and improve processes.
  • “Us” Vs. “Them.” Competitive strategy drives businesses to hunker down behind the physical walls of an office and the virtual walls of a brand. Customers are seen as “targets” whose participation is limited to handing over money. Competitors are seen as “enemies.” Suppliers are viewed as “necessary evils.” This approach to business may produce short-term results, but at the expense of true collaboration and long-term results – everyone benefits when these relationships are viewed as an ecosystem of related collaborators rather than competing interests.

In order to meet these looming challenges, businesses need to fully understand the legacy structures in place within an organization and determine how to leverage these structures while implementing new processes to improve results.

URBAN RE:VISION | Archive | FEATURED
Though women represent a disproportionately low percentage of the world’s utilized capital, they may also be a key to overcoming serious obstacles from poverty to climate change. When we unleash their talents and bring their inherent qualities into balance with the world’s power structures, things change. Read the full story  

URBAN RE:VISION | Archive | FEATURED

Though women represent a disproportionately low percentage of the world’s utilized capital, they may also be a key to overcoming serious obstacles from poverty to climate change. When we unleash their talents and bring their inherent qualities into balance with the world’s power structures, things change. Read the full story  

emergentfutures:

The Children of Cyberspace: Old Fogies by Their 20s
“People two, three or four years apart are having completely different experiences with technology,” said Lee Rainie, director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project. “College students scratch their heads at what their high school siblings are doing, and they scratch their heads at their younger siblings. It has sped up generational differences.”

emergentfutures:

The Children of Cyberspace: Old Fogies by Their 20s

“People two, three or four years apart are having completely different experiences with technology,” said Lee Rainie, director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project. “College students scratch their heads at what their high school siblings are doing, and they scratch their heads at their younger siblings. It has sped up generational differences.”

People are already using this economic slowdown to retool and reorient economies. Germany, Britain, China and the U.S. have all used stimulus bills to make huge new investments in clean power. South Korea’s new national paradigm for development is called: “Low carbon, green growth.” Who knew? People are realizing we need more than incremental changes — and we’re seeing the first stirrings of growth in smarter, more efficient, more responsible ways.