What’s In Your Gut? Ask Citizen Science | Co.Exist
The American Gut Project is trying to create a better picture of the human “microbiome.” Give it some of your info, and they’ll tell you a lot about all the bugs that make up your digestive system and how they’re affecting your health.

What’s In Your Gut? Ask Citizen Science | Co.Exist

The American Gut Project is trying to create a better picture of the human “microbiome.” Give it some of your info, and they’ll tell you a lot about all the bugs that make up your digestive system and how they’re affecting your health.

Help End Homelessness With This Simple Survey App
According to National Alliance to End Homelessness report The State of Homelessness in America 2012, the estimated number of homeless people in the United States was 636,017 at the end last year. That’s a 1% decrease between 2009 and 2011, but there’s still cause for concern — economic and demographic indicators show that homelessness might escalate over the next few years.
The 100,000 Homes Campaign is trying to change that with its new mobile-friendly app, Homeless Connector. The campaign, which is a national movement to find permanent homes for 100,000 chronically homeless individuals and families by July 2014, created the app to empower people around the country to help end homelessness.
Homeless Connector is a web-based smartphone version of 100,000 Homes’ “Vulnerability Index,” a survey that records data regarding the age, health, institutional history (i.e., military, hospital, jail, prison), and length of homelessness of homeless Americans.

Help End Homelessness With This Simple Survey App

According to National Alliance to End Homelessness report The State of Homelessness in America 2012, the estimated number of homeless people in the United States was 636,017 at the end last year. That’s a 1% decrease between 2009 and 2011, but there’s still cause for concern — economic and demographic indicators show that homelessness might escalate over the next few years.

The 100,000 Homes Campaign is trying to change that with its new mobile-friendly app, Homeless Connector. The campaign, which is a national movement to find permanent homes for 100,000 chronically homeless individuals and families by July 2014, created the app to empower people around the country to help end homelessness.

Homeless Connector is a web-based smartphone version of 100,000 Homes’ “Vulnerability Index,” a survey that records data regarding the age, health, institutional history (i.e., military, hospital, jail, prison), and length of homelessness of homeless Americans.

Send Bird-Watching Data Straight to Scientists With Your Smartphone | Wired Science | Wired.com
A new smartphone app allows bird watchers to share sightings with scientists straight from the field.
BirdLog, developed by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, is a companion tool for eBird, the world’s largest online database of bird observations.
Gathered by bird watchers around the world, eBird data is used by biologists, land managers and ornithologists to track avian populations trends. According to eBird’s program overview, these millions of hobbyist observations “will become the foundation for a better understanding of bird distribution across the western hemisphere and beyond.”

Send Bird-Watching Data Straight to Scientists With Your Smartphone | Wired Science | Wired.com

A new smartphone app allows bird watchers to share sightings with scientists straight from the field.

BirdLog, developed by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, is a companion tool for eBird, the world’s largest online database of bird observations.

Gathered by bird watchers around the world, eBird data is used by biologists, land managers and ornithologists to track avian populations trends. According to eBird’s program overview, these millions of hobbyist observations “will become the foundation for a better understanding of bird distribution across the western hemisphere and beyond.”

Citizen Sensor | DIY Environmental Monitoring — Development Blog
Citizen Sensor is DIY, wearable, reconfigurable sensor pack and data contextualization system that allows users to collect, share, and understand data using sensors recording environmental conditions such as carbon monoxide, light, noise pollution, and methane gas exposure among others. Users choose what to sense, and then connect with others around the world to share knowledge and experience. We want to empower the general public to learn more about their own personal space and measure where we live and play on a daily basis. 

Citizen Sensor | DIY Environmental Monitoring — Development Blog

Citizen Sensor is DIY, wearable, reconfigurable sensor pack and data contextualization system that allows users to collect, share, and understand data using sensors recording environmental conditions such as carbon monoxide, light, noise pollution, and methane gas exposure among others. Users choose what to sense, and then connect with others around the world to share knowledge and experience. We want to empower the general public to learn more about their own personal space and measure where we live and play on a daily basis. 

Project Noah Gamifies all that Nature has to Offer | Gamification Blog
Ever wondered what plant rooted itself in your garden, or what strange  bug somehow survived the bitter cold outside to call your house its  home? Or maybe on vacation to warmer reaches, you came across a disturbingly large insect? Some might run the other way, but if you are like me, you’re asking “what the hell is that?” Project Noah brings together a community that can help. It’s been out for over a  year, and Project Noah has already engaged thousands of users in the  age-old game that has attracted the likes of Darwin and Teddy Roosevelt:  discovering and identifying nature’s treasures.
The web app is accessible and well designed, and the experience is also  available on iOS and Android for finding critters in the field.  Gamification features engage users towards contributing regularly. There  is not a leaderboard, but top photos of the day are featured and reward  users for contributing (check out yesterdays winning photo of a whale  shark from user JessyZich). The overall design of the website is excellent, drawing on many of the design philosophies of gamification and engagement.

Project Noah Gamifies all that Nature has to Offer | Gamification Blog

Ever wondered what plant rooted itself in your garden, or what strange bug somehow survived the bitter cold outside to call your house its home? Or maybe on vacation to warmer reaches, you came across a disturbingly large insect? Some might run the other way, but if you are like me, you’re asking “what the hell is that?” Project Noah brings together a community that can help. It’s been out for over a year, and Project Noah has already engaged thousands of users in the age-old game that has attracted the likes of Darwin and Teddy Roosevelt: discovering and identifying nature’s treasures.

The web app is accessible and well designed, and the experience is also available on iOS and Android for finding critters in the field. Gamification features engage users towards contributing regularly. There is not a leaderboard, but top photos of the day are featured and reward users for contributing (check out yesterdays winning photo of a whale shark from user JessyZich). The overall design of the website is excellent, drawing on many of the design philosophies of gamification and engagement.


Citizen Planet Hunters Help Scientists Locate Distant Worlds
 
Citizen science, first with protein folding video games, and now the search for distant planets:

“This Planet Hunters project, with 400,000 users worldwide, supplements the work of scientists from the Kepler project, who are looking at light patterns of 150,000 stars for tell-tale signs of far away rocky worlds crossing in their path.
The data from the Kepler Mission were released to the public in December, 2010, and the two exoplanets were flagged within the next month. The astronomers described the two new planet potentials—the first to be found by the public—in a new study that describes how crowd sourcing data from the Kepler Mission is valuable tool in the hunt for exoplanets. (Anyone who contributed to the project and chose to have their name released is publically acknowledged here).”

(via Fast Company)

jtotheizzoe:

Citizen Planet Hunters Help Scientists Locate Distant Worlds

Citizen science, first with protein folding video games, and now the search for distant planets:

“This Planet Hunters project, with 400,000 users worldwide, supplements the work of scientists from the Kepler project, who are looking at light patterns of 150,000 stars for tell-tale signs of far away rocky worlds crossing in their path.

The data from the Kepler Mission were released to the public in December, 2010, and the two exoplanets were flagged within the next month. The astronomers described the two new planet potentials—the first to be found by the public—in a new study that describes how crowd sourcing data from the Kepler Mission is valuable tool in the hunt for exoplanets. (Anyone who contributed to the project and chose to have their name released is publically acknowledged here).”

(via Fast Company)

jtotheizzoe:

(via jtotheizzoe)

Make: Online : Spy on your brain and heart with Arduino EEG
Have you always wanted to monitor your brains signals, but didn’t have the money or expertise for an expensive setup? I caught up yesterday with Jacob Shiach about the Arduino EEG Project, which I first heard at the Open Science Summit in Berkeley, CA back in July.

Make: Online : Spy on your brain and heart with Arduino EEG

Have you always wanted to monitor your brains signals, but didn’t have the money or expertise for an expensive setup? I caught up yesterday with Jacob Shiach about the Arduino EEG Project, which I first heard at the Open Science Summit in Berkeley, CA back in July.

IBM App “Creek Watch” to Help Monitor Water Health in California (via IBMLabs)

IBM Research created an iPhone application to help local water boards collect and analyze critical data about water. A form of crowdsourcing called Citizen Science, people hiking or biking passed a creek or stream can snap a photo with their phones, answer a few simple questions about the condition of the water, and instantly send it off to their local water authority.

The app is called Creek Watch and will be available for free in App Store soon. Visit www.creekwatch.org to sign up to be notified when the app is live.