IBM Watson making progress to becoming a useful medical assistance for diagnosis and treatment planning

nextbigfuture.com

To test the system, Watson was first tasked with answering questions taken from Doctor’s Dilemma, a competition for trainee doctors that takes place at the annual meeting of the American College of Physicians. Watson was given 188 questions that i…

 Watson Goes to the Hospital
Source: Technology Review

Last week, IBM’s Watson computer beat two human competitors on Jeopardy. Before the contest was even over, IBM and Nuance, a leading maker of voice-recognition software, announced plans to put Watson to work in the health-care industry.
The idea is for Watson to digest huge quantities of medical information and deliver useful real-time information to physicians, perhaps eventually in response to voice questions. If successful, the system could help medical experts diagnose conditions or create a treatment plan. But it could prove a far more challenging trick than winning a game show.
"The medical domain doubles in knowledge every few years," said Janet Dillione, executive vice president and general manager of the health-care division of Nuance. “No human brain can possibly retain all the information that’s out there.”
Dillione says that while other health-care technology can work with huge pools of data, Watson is the first system capable of usefully harnessing the vast amounts of medical information that exists in the form of natural language text—medical papers, records, and notes. Nuance hopes to roll out the first commercial system based on Watson technology within two years, although it has not said how sophisticated this system will be.

 Watson Goes to the Hospital

Source: Technology Review

Last week, IBM’s Watson computer beat two human competitors on Jeopardy. Before the contest was even over, IBM and Nuance, a leading maker of voice-recognition software, announced plans to put Watson to work in the health-care industry.

The idea is for Watson to digest huge quantities of medical information and deliver useful real-time information to physicians, perhaps eventually in response to voice questions. If successful, the system could help medical experts diagnose conditions or create a treatment plan. But it could prove a far more challenging trick than winning a game show.

"The medical domain doubles in knowledge every few years," said Janet Dillione, executive vice president and general manager of the health-care division of Nuance. “No human brain can possibly retain all the information that’s out there.”

Dillione says that while other health-care technology can work with huge pools of data, Watson is the first system capable of usefully harnessing the vast amounts of medical information that exists in the form of natural language text—medical papers, records, and notes. Nuance hopes to roll out the first commercial system based on Watson technology within two years, although it has not said how sophisticated this system will be.

IBM, Aetna roll out cloud-based clinical decision support system | Businessweek

IBM and health-insurance giant Aetna Inc. Thursday introduced a cloud-computing offering that analyzes patient data stored in electronic medical records (EMRs) and administrative data systems and sends updates on treatment progress, drug interactions and best practices to physicians.

IBM teamed with Aetna subsidary ActiveHealth Management to create the hosted Collaborative Care Solution product that provides clinical support for physicians, and allows patients to access their own data, without requiring an investment in new infrastructure. The Collabroative Care Solution supports so-called “evidence-based medicine,” expected to become a government requirement in the second-phase of "meaningful use" rules for EMRs.