Multi-screen mania: how our devices work together — GigaOM

With more devices at our disposal, users are finding ways to spread out their tasks between screens, moving from smartphones to PCs and tablets. That’s one of the findings of a new multi-screen study by Google.

multiscreenphoto: Google

The reality of our multi-screen world is that consumers are increasingly turning to different devices throughout the day to accomplish tasks. A user might rely on a smartphone to dash off a quick text message or to scan a product in store, then use a tablet to plan trips at home and then turn to a PC to do more heavy research.

But we’re not just tackling discrete jobs with each device. We’re spreading out tasks between devices, starting something on one screen and then completing the task on another machine. That’s the conclusion of new research from Google, which set out to understand how we’re using our network of devices. And that has implications for publishers and marketers, who are trying to understand how to stay in front of consumers as they use more devices.

ibmsocialbiz:

Rise of the enterprise “toys.”  The past three quarters have seen more than $10 billion in enterprise cloud consolidation. Across mobile and web, new solutions are emerging that help workers connect and communicate better with their customers, analyze business data, gain new clients, manage their payroll and expenses, and more. The enterprise software space, which is attracting more investment than consumer internet, is chasing hundreds of billions of dollars that are now up for grabs in enterprise IT spend. Via  TechCrunch 

ibmsocialbiz:

Rise of the enterprise “toys.”  The past three quarters have seen more than $10 billion in enterprise cloud consolidation. Across mobile and web, new solutions are emerging that help workers connect and communicate better with their customers, analyze business data, gain new clients, manage their payroll and expenses, and more. The enterprise software space, which is attracting more investment than consumer internet, is chasing hundreds of billions of dollars that are now up for grabs in enterprise IT spend. Via  TechCrunch 

ibmsocialbiz:

How Africa is embracing “the cloud” on its own terms. Landline, Internet and electricity challenges make Africa an increasingly attractive proving ground for cloud computing. Out of the one billion people in Africa, only an estimated 140 million use the Internet, but over 600 million use mobile phones. And given the lack of reliable power grids, rechargeable mobile devices are a more practical way of accessing Internet-based applications than PCs. Broad use of mobile application services in Africa is already the norm, and adoption of some types of mobile applications already dwarfs their usage in the US.
For example, Safaricom’s M-PESA mobile payment system, which allows customers to transfer money to each other via mobile phones, has largely replaced cash transactions in Kenya. Users are sticking to content within apps without realizing they’re Web-based at all. Technology development is now focused on this mobile market and serving the “un-webbed,” including ways to get applications distributed to customers using their non-Web, real-world social networks. Via  Ars Technica

ibmsocialbiz:

How Africa is embracing “the cloud” on its own terms. Landline, Internet and electricity challenges make Africa an increasingly attractive proving ground for cloud computing. Out of the one billion people in Africa, only an estimated 140 million use the Internet, but over 600 million use mobile phones. And given the lack of reliable power grids, rechargeable mobile devices are a more practical way of accessing Internet-based applications than PCs. Broad use of mobile application services in Africa is already the norm, and adoption of some types of mobile applications already dwarfs their usage in the US.

For example, Safaricom’s M-PESA mobile payment system, which allows customers to transfer money to each other via mobile phones, has largely replaced cash transactions in Kenya. Users are sticking to content within apps without realizing they’re Web-based at all. Technology development is now focused on this mobile market and serving the “un-webbed,” including ways to get applications distributed to customers using their non-Web, real-world social networks. Via  Ars Technica

IBM, Aetna roll out cloud-based clinical decision support system | Businessweek

IBM and health-insurance giant Aetna Inc. Thursday introduced a cloud-computing offering that analyzes patient data stored in electronic medical records (EMRs) and administrative data systems and sends updates on treatment progress, drug interactions and best practices to physicians.

IBM teamed with Aetna subsidary ActiveHealth Management to create the hosted Collaborative Care Solution product that provides clinical support for physicians, and allows patients to access their own data, without requiring an investment in new infrastructure. The Collabroative Care Solution supports so-called “evidence-based medicine,” expected to become a government requirement in the second-phase of "meaningful use" rules for EMRs.

The fact is that cloud computing is no longer just hype. It is recognized as a key transformational trend in IT today. The adoption of private, public or hybrid cloud environments can help significantly help organizations reduce IT management complexity and skill requirements; share resources among multiple applications; accelerate time to market; and support both existing and emerging, data-intensive workloads.

Online memory, or LifeLogging or e-memory as it’s called, is probably closer than you may think. Here are 22 tools can let you put your life online today.
 
What if you could remember everything—every person you’ve met, every conversation you’ve had—and then retrieve that information in an instant? You would never lose a phone number. You’d  be able to share those fleeting memories with anyone and find where you put those damn keys. 

Once you move your core applications into a cloud-type scenario, all you really have as an interface is a Web browser, which makes access control and password management and identity management incredibly important. You’re not securing pieces or chunks of the network anymore. You’re securing the end user—how they access the network and what they do once they’re on. You’re really entrusting the provider with a lot—make sure that they can provide best practices for access management and identity management.

Phil Hochmuth, senior analyst at research firm Yankee Group as quoted in Public clouds, private clouds and your security

Some will suggest that cloud computing is simply another name for the Software as a Service (SaaS) model that has been on the forefront of the Web 2.0 movement. Others say that cloud computing is marketing hype that puts a new face on old technology, such as utility computing, virtualization, or grid computing. This thinking discounts the fact that cloud computing has a wider scope than any of these particular technologies. To be sure, cloud solutions often includes these technologies (and others), but it’s the comprehensive strategy that sets cloud computing apart from its predecessors

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