ibmsocialbiz:

Networks and complexity. Organizations and societies evolved from tribes to institutions to markets to networks, each stage triggered by major societal changes in communications. The written word enabled institutions, the printed word fostered regional and global markets, and the digital word is empowering worldwide networks.

ibmsocialbiz:

Networks and complexity. Organizations and societies evolved from tribes to institutions to markets to networks, each stage triggered by major societal changes in communications. The written word enabled institutions, the printed word fostered regional and global markets, and the digital word is empowering worldwide networks.

smarterleaders:

IBM  | The CEO Study Student Survey: Insights from Future Leaders
Based on what they say today, what will future leaders do differently from today’s CEOs? Given the complex world future leaders will inherit, how do the views of today’s students and CEOs compare in regard to the role of business leadership? According to a new global study of more than 3,600 students in college and graduate schools, the future leaders already have some distinct ideas based on their values about globalization and sustainability. This year, for the first time, we conducted a Global Student Study in conjunction with the Global CEO Study. Side by side, these two reports provide a view of leadership from different generations, and a glimpse of what leadership may look like in the future. Students’ perceptions have been profoundly shaped by the digital and interconnected world of their school years. What is the impact of those experiences? Given the world they inherited from previous generations, what do today’s students believe about the role of public and private organizations? Most importantly, when they become leaders themselves, what are they likely to do differently?
Download Global Student Study, Inheriting a  Complex World: Future Leaders Envision Sharing the Planet

smarterleaders:

IBM | The CEO Study Student Survey: Insights from Future Leaders

Based on what they say today, what will future leaders do differently from today’s CEOs? Given the complex world future leaders will inherit, how do the views of today’s students and CEOs compare in regard to the role of business leadership? According to a new global study of more than 3,600 students in college and graduate schools, the future leaders already have some distinct ideas based on their values about globalization and sustainability. This year, for the first time, we conducted a Global Student Study in conjunction with the Global CEO Study. Side by side, these two reports provide a view of leadership from different generations, and a glimpse of what leadership may look like in the future. Students’ perceptions have been profoundly shaped by the digital and interconnected world of their school years. What is the impact of those experiences? Given the world they inherited from previous generations, what do today’s students believe about the role of public and private organizations? Most importantly, when they become leaders themselves, what are they likely to do differently?

Download Global Student Study, Inheriting a Complex World: Future Leaders Envision Sharing the Planet

How has the nature of leadership changed in the new economic environment?

In a world fraught with uncertainty, what are today’s CEOs doing to strengthen their situations against competitors?

Previously, CEOs have consistently identified change as their most pressing challenge. Today, CEOs are telling us that the complexity of operating in an increasingly volatile and uncertain world is their primary challenge. And, a surprising number of them told us that they feel ill-equipped to succeed in this drastically different world.

How are leaders dealing with this level of complexity? What strategies are the most successful organizations employing to tap into new opportunities, and overcome the barriers to growth? To find out, we conducted over 1500 face-to-face interviews—the largest known study of its kind with CEOs from companies of all sizes across 60 countries, representing 33 industries.

Find out more in Capitalizing on Complexity

Overview of Complex Systems | New England Complex Systems Institute Complex systems science is a new field of science studying how parts of a system give rise to its collective behaviors, as well as how the system interacts with its environment. Social systems formed by people, the brain formed by neurons, molecules formed by atoms, the weather formed by air flows— these are all examples of complex systems. By using mathematics to focus on pattern formation, and the question of parts, wholes and relationships, the field of complex systems cuts across all the disciplines of science, as well as engineering, management, and medicine.

Overview of Complex Systems | New England Complex Systems Institute Complex systems science is a new field of science studying how parts of a system give rise to its collective behaviors, as well as how the system interacts with its environment. Social systems formed by people, the brain formed by neurons, molecules formed by atoms, the weather formed by air flows— these are all examples of complex systems. By using mathematics to focus on pattern formation, and the question of parts, wholes and relationships, the field of complex systems cuts across all the disciplines of science, as well as engineering, management, and medicine.

Scientists in the US have made a major advance in their understanding of so-called freak waves. These monster waves present a major risk to ships and offshore platforms. A computer simulation developed by oceanographers in the US could help locate where and when these “rogue” phenomena are most likely to occur. The theoretical study shows that coastal areas with variations in water depth and strong currents are hot spots for freak waves. (via BBC NEWS | Science & Environment | Freak wave ‘hot spots’ identified)

Scientists in the US have made a major advance in their understanding of so-called freak waves. These monster waves present a major risk to ships and offshore platforms. A computer simulation developed by oceanographers in the US could help locate where and when these “rogue” phenomena are most likely to occur. The theoretical study shows that coastal areas with variations in water depth and strong currents are hot spots for freak waves. (via BBC NEWS | Science & Environment | Freak wave ‘hot spots’ identified)