Taking transistors into a new dimension
A new breakthrough could push the limits of the miniaturization of electronic components further than previously thought possible. A team at the Laboratoire d’Analyse et d’Architecture des Systèmes (LAAS) and Institut d’Électronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN) has built a nanometric transistor that displays exceptional properties for a device of its size. To achieve this result, the researchers developed a novel three-dimensional architecture consisting of a vertical nanowire array whose conductivity is controlled by a gate measuring only 14 nm in length. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-03-transistors-dimension.html#jCp

Taking transistors into a new dimension

A new breakthrough could push the limits of the miniaturization of electronic components further than previously thought possible. A team at the Laboratoire d’Analyse et d’Architecture des Systèmes (LAAS) and Institut d’Électronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN) has built a nanometric transistor that displays exceptional properties for a device of its size. To achieve this result, the researchers developed a novel three-dimensional architecture consisting of a vertical nanowire array whose conductivity is controlled by a gate measuring only 14 nm in length.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-03-transistors-dimension.html#jCp
The Appification Of Everything Will Transform The World’s 360 Million Web Sites - Forbes
There is a seismic shift underway in the digital world that within a decade will completely transform the web into an App-o-verse. Several simultaneous trends are stacking up to change how we consume and create digital content, and platform companies are positioning themselves to enable the process.
What we are seeing are the early stages of what I call, “The Appification of Everything.” This is not about adding more icons to your home screen, though, but about a fundamental shift in how we metabolize information and entertainment. The web as the universal storage medium is being superseded by the internet as universal flow medium. Instead of thinking about the web as a hierarchical tree of documents—a Wikipedia of Wikipedias—we need to start thinking about all of that content as an underlying service layer for application-based interfaces.

The Appification Of Everything Will Transform The World’s 360 Million Web Sites - Forbes

There is a seismic shift underway in the digital world that within a decade will completely transform the web into an App-o-verse. Several simultaneous trends are stacking up to change how we consume and create digital content, and platform companies are positioning themselves to enable the process.

What we are seeing are the early stages of what I call, “The Appification of Everything.” This is not about adding more icons to your home screen, though, but about a fundamental shift in how we metabolize information and entertainment. The web as the universal storage medium is being superseded by the internet as universal flow medium. Instead of thinking about the web as a hierarchical tree of documents—a Wikipedia of Wikipedias—we need to start thinking about all of that content as an underlying service layer for application-based interfaces.

Researchers Create Working Transistor Out of Single Atom:



Researchers have created a working transistor out of a single phosphorus atom and in the process have shown that Moore’s Law, the cornerstone of the semiconductor industry, might hold true much longer than anyone expected.



To make their tiny transistor, the group, which was led by Michelle Simmons, a researcher at the University of New South Wales, in Australia, bathed silicon in phosphine gas. They then used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a technique common in lithography to replace one silicon atom in a six-atom lattice with a phosphorus atom.



“Controlling a chemical reaction so that just one phosphorus atom was introduced into the device was challenging,” says Simmons.



When the team—which also included researchers from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Purdue University, and the universities of Sydney and Melbourne—applied a voltage across the phosphorus atom, it behaved like a transistor, switching and amplifying an electrical current.



(via joshbyard: A Single-Atom Transistor - IEEE Spectrum)

Researchers Create Working Transistor Out of Single Atom:

Researchers have created a working transistor out of a single phosphorus atom and in the process have shown that Moore’s Law, the cornerstone of the semiconductor industry, might hold true much longer than anyone expected.

To make their tiny transistor, the group, which was led by Michelle Simmons, a researcher at the University of New South Wales, in Australia, bathed silicon in phosphine gas. They then used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a technique common in lithography to replace one silicon atom in a six-atom lattice with a phosphorus atom.

“Controlling a chemical reaction so that just one phosphorus atom was introduced into the device was challenging,” says Simmons.

When the team—which also included researchers from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Purdue University, and the universities of Sydney and Melbourne—applied a voltage across the phosphorus atom, it behaved like a transistor, switching and amplifying an electrical current.

(via joshbyardA Single-Atom Transistor - IEEE Spectrum)

IBM creates 9nm carbon nanotube transistor | The Verge

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IBM has created 9nm transistors from carbon nanotubes, the same versatile material that the world’s lightest material is constructed from and can also camouflage objects. In contrast, silicon has a theoretical limit of 10nm, and while transistor architectures are currently pushing 22nm, a presentation in July showed Intel could have 10nm chips ready by 2015 (PDF). Smaller architectures not only lead to smaller chips, but also  lower power usage — something that the researchers say the carbon  transistor delivered even better than expected.

IBM creates 9nm carbon nanotube transistor | The Verge

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 Share

IBM has created 9nm transistors from carbon nanotubes, the same versatile material that the world’s lightest material is constructed from and can also camouflage objects. In contrast, silicon has a theoretical limit of 10nm, and while transistor architectures are currently pushing 22nm, a presentation in July showed Intel could have 10nm chips ready by 2015 (PDF). Smaller architectures not only lead to smaller chips, but also lower power usage — something that the researchers say the carbon transistor delivered even better than expected.

A Century of Smart: The IBM 1401 (1959) (via IBMSocialMedia)

The Computer History Museum recently honored one of the great teams in computing history when it marked the 50th anniversary of the legendary IBM 1401.

The 1401 was really the first business computer, putting unprecedented computing power within the reach of a whole new range of business customers a machine packed with significant technical and business innovation.

A current IBMer said it best when he remarked: … I think of (the 1401 team) as IBMs version of the original Mercury astronauts. They were a team that thrived on challenge. They were driven by curiosity. They were devoted to meaningful innovation. And they aimed high they wanted to change the world. The 1401 will be remembered not just for the technological achievements which were groundbreaking. Not just for the impact on business which was deep. But for their impact on IBM itself.”

A few months before the Computer History Museum event, about 60 members of the team gathered for a reunion in Endicott, NY, where the 1401 was created. This video captures a few of their thoughts and reflections on that great era in computing history.

A City in the Cloud: Living PlanIT Redefines Cities as Software | Fast Company
Physicist and former Sante Fe Institute president Geoffrey West practically stole the show with his talk on urban metabolisms. Cities are like organisms, he explained, except they grow much faster and much bigger than anything living – in fact, there appears to be no upper limit to their size or propensity for innovation… or disaster. “Urbanization is the problem,” he said, “and it can also be the solution.”
These being Silicon Valley types, it was clear what that solution should be. “Copying 20th century cities in Dubai and Shanghai is crazy,” said former Sony chairman Nobuyuki Idei in yet another session. “We need… a city OS” – a single platform managing power, water, traffic, security and any other urban system you can think of. 

A City in the Cloud: Living PlanIT Redefines Cities as Software | Fast Company

Physicist and former Sante Fe Institute president Geoffrey West practically stole the show with his talk on urban metabolisms. Cities are like organisms, he explained, except they grow much faster and much bigger than anything living – in fact, there appears to be no upper limit to their size or propensity for innovation… or disaster. “Urbanization is the problem,” he said, “and it can also be the solution.”

These being Silicon Valley types, it was clear what that solution should be. “Copying 20th century cities in Dubai and Shanghai is crazy,” said former Sony chairman Nobuyuki Idei in yet another session. “We need… a city OS” – a single platform managing power, water, traffic, security and any other urban system you can think of. 

Computers guide traffic lights to reduce congestion for commuters, other drivers

smartercities:

Traffic systems — and the stoplights that are their highway sentinels — are complex networks that must be synchronized with Balanchine precision or rush hour will descend from the normal headache into commuter hell.

Washington Post

ReadWriteWeb Interview With Tim Berners-Lee, Part 2: Search Engines, User Interfaces for Data, Wolfram Alpha, And More…

In part 2 of my one-on-one interview with Tim Berners-Lee, we explore a variety of topics relating to Linked Data and the Semantic Web. If you missed it, in Part 1 of the interview we covered the emergence of Linked Data and how it is being used now even by governments.

ReadWriteWeb Interview With Tim Berners-Lee, Part 2: Search Engines, User Interfaces for Data, Wolfram Alpha, And More…

In part 2 of my one-on-one interview with Tim Berners-Lee, we explore a variety of topics relating to Linked Data and the Semantic Web. If you missed it, in Part 1 of the interview we covered the emergence of Linked Data and how it is being used now even by governments.

Startups looking to make money by enhancing reality | VentureBeat)
Augmented reality (AR) technology, which overlays 3-D graphics or information over a live camera feed, isn’t a brand-new idea. But now that smartphones are penetrating the mass market, AR may be on the cusp of wide adoption. Imagine traveling to a foreign country, pointing your camera at a building and having it up pull up a trove of historical information, video and images of the place over the past century. (via

Startups looking to make money by enhancing reality | VentureBeat)

Augmented reality (AR) technology, which overlays 3-D graphics or information over a live camera feed, isn’t a brand-new idea. But now that smartphones are penetrating the mass market, AR may be on the cusp of wide adoption. Imagine traveling to a foreign country, pointing your camera at a building and having it up pull up a trove of historical information, video and images of the place over the past century. (via

Information On Demand, Information Agenda and Smarter Planet are driving smarter business outcomes for business and the world (via infoondemand)

Health Information Technology Saves Lives In Hospitals

A new study has found evidence to suggest that hospitals that have a higher rate of use of health information technology (HIT) may see fewer deaths, fewer complications, and lower health care costs.