Concrete, the world’s most abundant man-made substance, ranks second to coal as the world’s dirtiest industrial material. But a company in Halifax, Canada, is working to make concrete plants carbon neutral, using captured CO2 to improve their product. More here.

Concrete, the world’s most abundant man-made substance, ranks second to coal as the world’s dirtiest industrial material. But a company in Halifax, Canada, is working to make concrete plants carbon neutral, using captured CO2 to improve their product. More here.

(via thisbigcity)

Solar thermal process produces cement with no carbon dioxide emissions | physorg.com
While the largest contributor to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is the power industry, the second largest is the more often overlooked cement industry, which accounts for 5-6% of all anthropogenic CO2emissions. For every 10 kg of cement produced, the cement industry releases a full 9 kg of CO2. Since the world consumes about 3 trillion kg of cement annually, this sector has one of the highest potentials for CO2 emission reductions. But while processes are being explored to sequester the CO2 from cement production, so far no process can completely eliminate it.

Solar thermal process produces cement with no carbon dioxide emissions | physorg.com

While the largest contributor to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is the power industry, the second largest is the more often overlooked cement industry, which accounts for 5-6% of all anthropogenic CO2emissions. For every 10 kg of cement produced, the cement industry releases a full 9 kg of CO2. Since the world consumes about 3 trillion kg of cement annually, this sector has one of the highest potentials for CO2 emission reductions. But while processes are being explored to sequester the CO2 from cement production, so far no process can completely eliminate it.

100-Mile Houses Expand the Locavore Movement From Food to Architecture - Design - GOOD
Briony Penn’s 100-mile house in Salt Spring Island, British Columbia
The rise of the locavore movement introduced millions of people to the 100-mile diet,  which involves eating only food produced within one’s own region. Now, a  new focus on sustainable architecture is applying the same concept to  homes.
The idea of a 100-mile house shouldn’t be shocking:  Historically, most homes were made using local materials simply because  it was more practical. But in an age when even middle-class homeowners  can order marble countertops from Italy and bamboo floors from China,  creating a home entirely from local materials challenges builders to  carefully consider every piece of the structure, from the foundation to  the eaves.
Last week, the Architecture Foundation of British Columbia launched an international competition to design a 1,200-square-foot, four-person home that exclusively uses  materials made or recycled within 100 miles of Vancouver. David M.  Hewitt, the current chair of the Architecture Foundation, came up with  the idea for the competition on a whim and presented it at a board  meeting. “It was almost thrown out facetiously, and everybody latched  onto it,” he says

100-Mile Houses Expand the Locavore Movement From Food to Architecture - Design - GOOD

Briony Penn’s 100-mile house in Salt Spring Island, British Columbia

The rise of the locavore movement introduced millions of people to the 100-mile diet, which involves eating only food produced within one’s own region. Now, a new focus on sustainable architecture is applying the same concept to homes.

The idea of a 100-mile house shouldn’t be shocking: Historically, most homes were made using local materials simply because it was more practical. But in an age when even middle-class homeowners can order marble countertops from Italy and bamboo floors from China, creating a home entirely from local materials challenges builders to carefully consider every piece of the structure, from the foundation to the eaves.

Last week, the Architecture Foundation of British Columbia launched an international competition to design a 1,200-square-foot, four-person home that exclusively uses materials made or recycled within 100 miles of Vancouver. David M. Hewitt, the current chair of the Architecture Foundation, came up with the idea for the competition on a whim and presented it at a board meeting. “It was almost thrown out facetiously, and everybody latched onto it,” he says

Contour Crafting is a construction technology that potentially reduces energy use and emissions by using a rapid-prototype or 3-D printing process to fabricate large components. Comprised of robotic arms and extrusion nozzles, a computer-controlled gantry system moves the nozzle back and forth, squeezing out layers of concrete or other material to fabricate a form. The ultimate goal is to print a house in a day while drastically reducing material and energy consumption.

Why Design Now?: Contour Crafting (by cooperhewitt)

SmartHat Developers Hope to Make Construction Sites Safer - RFID Journal
Researchers at Georgia Tech and Duke University have developed  and tested an energy-harvesting EPC Gen 2 RFID tag and reader designed  to alert workers and equipment operators in the event of an imminent  collision.
A team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology’s Real-time Automated Project Information and Decision Systems (RAPIDS) laboratory and Duke University have completed testing of an energy-harvesting radio frequency identification system that, when tags are attached to hard hats, can issue an alert in  the event that heavy equipment is moving too close to a worker on a  construction site. The solution is unique, in that the tag can operate  from power stored on a built-in capacitor,  enabling the tag to be smaller than it would have been if it had a  battery, while also ensuring that the system does not fail due to  batteries requiring replacement.

SmartHat Developers Hope to Make Construction Sites Safer - RFID Journal

Researchers at Georgia Tech and Duke University have developed and tested an energy-harvesting EPC Gen 2 RFID tag and reader designed to alert workers and equipment operators in the event of an imminent collision.

A team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology’s Real-time Automated Project Information and Decision Systems (RAPIDS) laboratory and Duke University have completed testing of an energy-harvesting radio frequency identification system that, when tags are attached to hard hats, can issue an alert in the event that heavy equipment is moving too close to a worker on a construction site. The solution is unique, in that the tag can operate from power stored on a built-in capacitor, enabling the tag to be smaller than it would have been if it had a battery, while also ensuring that the system does not fail due to batteries requiring replacement.

RFID Helps Control and Organize Construction Sites

Germany’s University of Wuppertal has developed a hardware and software platform that provides managers with up-to-the minute information regarding materials, tools and individuals entering and leaving job sites.

Constructions sites are beehives of activities, with vehicles dropping off materials, workers arriving and leaving, and tools being dropped off and picked up when they are no longer required. Activities must take place in carefully timed sequences to ensure each part of a project is completed as the next begins. Orchestrating all of this activity is difficult and time-consuming, but the Construction Management and Industry Department of Germany’s University of Wuppertal believes radio frequency identification can help.

Researchers have combined several RFID applications into a single “control center” designed to monitor and document personnel and materials as they enter and exit construction sites. The so-called RFID Construction Logistics Control Center combines RFID hardware, software and related computer systems within a freight container designed to be placed at the entrances and exits of construction sites.

(Read the full story on RFID Journal)

Kevin Surace invents eco-friendly drywall | Video on TED.com

Kevin Surace suggests we rethink basic construction materials — such as the familiar wallboard — to reduce the huge carbon footprint generated by the manufacturing and construction of our buildings. He introduces EcoRock, a clean, recyclable and energy-efficient drywall created by his team at Serious Materials.