IBM Finds a New Prospect in CMOs | SiliconANGLE

IBM plans to capitalize on the fact that marketing departments spend a bigger cut of their revenue on information technology than IT departments, a very ambitious move that can be credited to chief executive Virginia Rometty.  IBM’s first female CEO entered office in January this year.

While IBM’s revenue is expected to drop by one percent in Q2, marketing departments’ spending will increase by nine. And about a third of this is going into software that helps marketers manage customer relations and predict consumer trends – an industry that was worth no less than $25 billion in 2011.

“Yuchun Lee, an IBM vice president who is one of the strategy’s architects, says the company is making investments in technology that could help clients manage online customer interactions, analyze social media data and craft targeted pitches,” writes the Wall Street Journal.

Over the past few years, IBM has spent $3 billion acquiring companies in this market, such as Coremetrics, DemandTec Inc. and Tealeaf Technology Inc., Mr. Lee said.”

The Final Tally From IBM: Cyber Monday Online Spending Up 30 Percent From Last Year | TechCrunch
As of yesterday afternoon, Cyber Monday online sales were up 18 percent but apparently a surge of activity yesterday evening helped push the  day’s e-commerce sales to record amounts. Cyber Monday online sales,  according to IBM’s Coremetrics report, were up 33 percent over 2010, and up 29.3 percent over Black Friday.
IBM says that the average order amount was up 2.6 percent this year  from $193.24 to $198.26. The shopping peaks during the day took place at  11:05am PST/2:05pm EST as well as after commuting hours on both the  east and west coast.
On Cyber Monday, 10.8 percent of people used a mobile device to visit  a retailer’s site, up from 3.9 percent in 2010. Additionally, mobile  sales were up as well, reaching 6.6 percent on Cyber Monday versus 2.3  percent in 2010.
Interestingly, more people flocked to mobile devices to shop on Black  Friday than Cyber Monday. On Cyber Monday mobile traffic averaged 10.8  percent compared to 14.3 percent on Black Friday. And consumer sales on  mobile devices reached 6.6 percent versus 9.8 percent on Black Friday.

The Final Tally From IBM: Cyber Monday Online Spending Up 30 Percent From Last Year | TechCrunch

As of yesterday afternoon, Cyber Monday online sales were up 18 percent but apparently a surge of activity yesterday evening helped push the day’s e-commerce sales to record amounts. Cyber Monday online sales, according to IBM’s Coremetrics report, were up 33 percent over 2010, and up 29.3 percent over Black Friday.

IBM says that the average order amount was up 2.6 percent this year from $193.24 to $198.26. The shopping peaks during the day took place at 11:05am PST/2:05pm EST as well as after commuting hours on both the east and west coast.

On Cyber Monday, 10.8 percent of people used a mobile device to visit a retailer’s site, up from 3.9 percent in 2010. Additionally, mobile sales were up as well, reaching 6.6 percent on Cyber Monday versus 2.3 percent in 2010.

Interestingly, more people flocked to mobile devices to shop on Black Friday than Cyber Monday. On Cyber Monday mobile traffic averaged 10.8 percent compared to 14.3 percent on Black Friday. And consumer sales on mobile devices reached 6.6 percent versus 9.8 percent on Black Friday.

IBM: Black Friday Online Retail Spending Up 24.3 Percent | TechCrunch
Thanksgiving brought record online retail sales for the holiday, with spending up 39.3 percent over Thanksgiving 2010. And today, IBM Coremetrics data shows a 24.3 percent growth in online sales on Black Friday compared to the same period last year.
Mobile traffic on Black Friday was 14.3 percent of all retail traffic  compared to 5.6 percent in 2010. Sales on mobile devices surged to 9.8  percent from 3.2 percent year over year. As we saw with PayPal stats from Thanksgiving and Black Friday, mobile shopping volume is increasing by over 500 percent this year.
Mobile shopping was actually led by Apple devices, with the iPhone  and iPad ranking one and two for consumers shopping on mobile devices  (5.4 percent and 4.8 percent respectively). Android came in third at 4.1  percent. Collectively iPhone and iPad accounted for 10.2 percent of all  online retail traffic on Black Friday.
As predicted by eBay, Google and others, tablets were a major platform for shoppers this year. IBM  says that shoppers using the iPad led to more retail purchases more  often per visit than other mobile devices with conversion rates reaching  4.6 percent compared to 2.8 percent for overall mobile devices.

IBM: Black Friday Online Retail Spending Up 24.3 Percent | TechCrunch

Thanksgiving brought record online retail sales for the holiday, with spending up 39.3 percent over Thanksgiving 2010. And today, IBM Coremetrics data shows a 24.3 percent growth in online sales on Black Friday compared to the same period last year.

Mobile traffic on Black Friday was 14.3 percent of all retail traffic compared to 5.6 percent in 2010. Sales on mobile devices surged to 9.8 percent from 3.2 percent year over year. As we saw with PayPal stats from Thanksgiving and Black Friday, mobile shopping volume is increasing by over 500 percent this year.

Mobile shopping was actually led by Apple devices, with the iPhone and iPad ranking one and two for consumers shopping on mobile devices (5.4 percent and 4.8 percent respectively). Android came in third at 4.1 percent. Collectively iPhone and iPad accounted for 10.2 percent of all online retail traffic on Black Friday.

As predicted by eBay, Google and others, tablets were a major platform for shoppers this year. IBM says that shoppers using the iPad led to more retail purchases more often per visit than other mobile devices with conversion rates reaching 4.6 percent compared to 2.8 percent for overall mobile devices.

IBM: Mobile Retail Traffic Will More Than Double This Holiday Season | TechCrunch
IBM’s Coremetrics Benchmark is releasing data around holiday shopping  trends we can expect over the next few months. Big Blue says that  mobile retail traffic will more than double this holiday season.
During this year’s November holiday season, an unprecedented 15  percent of people in the U.S. logging onto a retailer’s web site are  expected to do so through a mobile device, says IBM. All online sales in  November will experience a growth of 12-15 percent over the same period  in 2010.
IBM reports that in October nearly 11 percent of people used a mobile  device to log onto a retailer’s site, up from 4.2 percent in October  2010. Additionally, mobile sales continue to increase, reaching a high  of 9.6 percent in October 2011, up from 3.4 percent in October 2010.
One of the new trends expected to take place is among Android users.  And for the first time, the growing number of Android users will  demonstrate similar levels of mobile shopping as iPhone users. These  October 2011 numbers show iPhone accounting for 4 percent of mobile  traffic and Android 3.5 percent. The iPad will also play a big role in  holiday shopping this season. In October, iPad conversion rates reached  6.8 percent as compared to the overall mobile device conversion rate of  3.6 percent.

IBM: Mobile Retail Traffic Will More Than Double This Holiday Season | TechCrunch

IBM’s Coremetrics Benchmark is releasing data around holiday shopping trends we can expect over the next few months. Big Blue says that mobile retail traffic will more than double this holiday season.

During this year’s November holiday season, an unprecedented 15 percent of people in the U.S. logging onto a retailer’s web site are expected to do so through a mobile device, says IBM. All online sales in November will experience a growth of 12-15 percent over the same period in 2010.

IBM reports that in October nearly 11 percent of people used a mobile device to log onto a retailer’s site, up from 4.2 percent in October 2010. Additionally, mobile sales continue to increase, reaching a high of 9.6 percent in October 2011, up from 3.4 percent in October 2010.

One of the new trends expected to take place is among Android users. And for the first time, the growing number of Android users will demonstrate similar levels of mobile shopping as iPhone users. These October 2011 numbers show iPhone accounting for 4 percent of mobile traffic and Android 3.5 percent. The iPad will also play a big role in holiday shopping this season. In October, iPad conversion rates reached 6.8 percent as compared to the overall mobile device conversion rate of 3.6 percent.

Shopping on cellphones and portable tablet computers like iPads accounted for about 5 percent of online sales in November, while last year mobile shopping sales were too insignificant to measure, according to Coremetrics, an e-commerce measurement service owned by I.B.M. Many more shoppers are using their phones to research items and compare prices before making purchases offline or on computers.

Business Schools Plan Leap Into Data - WSJ.com
Faced with an increasing stream of data from the Web and other electronic sources, many companies are seeking managers who can make sense of the numbers through the growing practice of data analytics, also known as business intelligence. Finding qualified candidates has proven difficult, but business schools hope to fill the talent gap.
This fall several schools, including Fordham University’s Graduate School of Business and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, are unveiling analytics electives, certificates and degree programs; other courses and programs were launched in the previous school year.
International Business Machines Corp., which has invested more than $14 billion buying analytics industry companies such as Coremetrics and Netezza Corp. since 2005, has teamed up with more than 200 schools, including Fordham, to develop analytics curriculum and training.
"The more students that graduate knowledgeable in areas we care about, the better it is not just for our company but the companies we work with," said Steve Mills, IBM senior vice president and group executive of software and systems. "It really comes down to what clients and customers need most."
Data analytics was once considered the purview of math, science and information-technology specialists. Now barraged with data from the Web and other sources, companies want employees who can both sift through the information and help solve business problems or strategize. For example, luxury fashion company Elie Tahari Ltd. uses analytics to examine historical buying patterns and predict future clothing purchases. Northeastern pizza chain Papa Gino’s Inc. uses analytics to examine the use of its loyalty program and has succeeded in boosting the average customer’s online order size.

Business Schools Plan Leap Into Data - WSJ.com

Faced with an increasing stream of data from the Web and other electronic sources, many companies are seeking managers who can make sense of the numbers through the growing practice of data analytics, also known as business intelligence. Finding qualified candidates has proven difficult, but business schools hope to fill the talent gap.

This fall several schools, including Fordham University’s Graduate School of Business and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, are unveiling analytics electives, certificates and degree programs; other courses and programs were launched in the previous school year.

International Business Machines Corp., which has invested more than $14 billion buying analytics industry companies such as Coremetrics and Netezza Corp. since 2005, has teamed up with more than 200 schools, including Fordham, to develop analytics curriculum and training.

"The more students that graduate knowledgeable in areas we care about, the better it is not just for our company but the companies we work with," said Steve Mills, IBM senior vice president and group executive of software and systems. "It really comes down to what clients and customers need most."

Data analytics was once considered the purview of math, science and information-technology specialists. Now barraged with data from the Web and other sources, companies want employees who can both sift through the information and help solve business problems or strategize. For example, luxury fashion company Elie Tahari Ltd. uses analytics to examine historical buying patterns and predict future clothing purchases. Northeastern pizza chain Papa Gino’s Inc. uses analytics to examine the use of its loyalty program and has succeeded in boosting the average customer’s online order size.