Can GPS Trackers Help Stop Prescription Painkiller Theft? | Fast Company
NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly hopes tricked-out fake bottles will lead to popping illicit pill poppers.
Police in New York City are planning to use fake prescription painkiller pill bottles with GPS trackers to try to curb the theft of highly addictive prescription pills, police commissioner Ray Kellyreportedly outlined yesterday in a speech at Bill Clinton’s Foundation’s conference on health issues in La Quinta, Calif.
Under the plan, which has been adopted by a few police departments across the country, police would ask pharmacies to store the fake bottles among the real prescription pills. When one is stolen (or removed from its home), it will emit a special signal that will allow police to track it.

Can GPS Trackers Help Stop Prescription Painkiller Theft? | Fast Company

NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly hopes tricked-out fake bottles will lead to popping illicit pill poppers.

Police in New York City are planning to use fake prescription painkiller pill bottles with GPS trackers to try to curb the theft of highly addictive prescription pills, police commissioner Ray Kellyreportedly outlined yesterday in a speech at Bill Clinton’s Foundation’s conference on health issues in La Quinta, Calif.

Under the plan, which has been adopted by a few police departments across the country, police would ask pharmacies to store the fake bottles among the real prescription pills. When one is stolen (or removed from its home), it will emit a special signal that will allow police to track it.

IBM is running in partnership with police departments across the nation, crunching massive amounts of public information to try to predict where and when crimes will occur. The project, known as CRUSH — Criminal Reduction Utilizing Statistical History — has proven very effective in pilot programs in several American cities, including Memphis, Tennessee, where it been credited with reducing serious crimes by 30 percent and violent crimes by 15 percent

Charleston’s police department is partnering with software giant IBM on a pilot project to better identify trends in armed robberies. By plugging in a variety of data, including variables such as the season, time of day and even the weather, officials hope to speed up results and uncover weak spots through what the industry calls “predictive analytics.”

Ideas from IBM – Public safety


It’s often a mundane detail that ultimately solves a crime. A nickname. A parking ticket. A past address. And it is mundane details—billions of them—that populate the data warehouse of the New York City Real Time Crime Center.

IBM Public safety

By collecting previous crime statistics and external factors — weather, time of day, day of week, moon phases, etc. — officers can estimate when and where crimes might occur using business intelligence (BI) capabilities. A new system was rolled out in a phased implementation beginning in 2006 that provides predictive crime analysis, data mining, reporting and GIS capabilities to the entire Richmond, Virginia police department. (via New Software Predicts Crime)

By collecting previous crime statistics and external factors — weather, time of day, day of week, moon phases, etc. — officers can estimate when and where crimes might occur using business intelligence (BI) capabilities. A new system was rolled out in a phased implementation beginning in 2006 that provides predictive crime analysis, data mining, reporting and GIS capabilities to the entire Richmond, Virginia police department. (via New Software Predicts Crime)