Record-Speed Wireless Data Bridge Demonstrated: Takes High-Speed Communications the Last Mile

A team of researchers in Germany has created a new way to overcome many of the issues associated with bringing high-speed digital communications across challenging terrain and into remote areas, commonly referred to as the “last mile” problem. The researchers developed a record-speed wireless data bridge that transmits digital information much faster than today’s state-of-the-art systems.

These unprecedented speeds, up to 20 billion bits of data per second, were achieved by using higher frequencies than those typically used in mobile communications—the wireless bridge operates at 200 gigahertz (GHz) (two orders of magnitude greater than cell phone frequencies).

via singularitarian:

(via jackmason)

Business Analytics - Turning Data Into Insight (by IBM)

In an era of Smarter Analytics, it is imperative that businesses leverage the massive quantities of data available to them. In order to remain competitive, data must be transformed into insight and integrated into business processes.

Connect w/ Simon Thomas at http://www.linkedin.com/pub/simon-thomas/1/228/45

IBM researchers store one bit of magnetic information in just 12 atoms (by IBMResearchAlmaden)

IBM Research - Almaden physicist Andreas Heinrich explains the industry-wide need to examine the future of storage at the atomic scale and how he and his teammates started with 1 atom and a scanning tunneling microscope and eventually succeeded in storing one bit of magnetic information reliably in 12 atoms.

IBM Brains Turn 12 Atoms Into World’s Smallest Storage Bit | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com
IBM researchers have found a way to put a single bit of data on a 12-atom surface, creating the world’s smallest magnetic storage device.
It’s a breakthrough that’s not likely to make its way into hard  drives or memory sticks for decades, but it gives us a hint at how much  road lies ahead for magnetic storage devices.
Before now, physicists really didn’t know how small they could take  magnetic storage before the laws of quantum mechanics would take over,  making it impossible to reliably store data. String together 8 atoms,  for example, and you simply can’t get a stable magnetic state, says  Andreas Heinrich, the IBM researcher behind the discovery. “The system  will just spontaneously hop from one of those states to another state in  a timescale that is too fast for us to claim anything like a data  storage [demonstration]. It might be switching 1,000 times per second.”

IBM Brains Turn 12 Atoms Into World’s Smallest Storage Bit | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

IBM researchers have found a way to put a single bit of data on a 12-atom surface, creating the world’s smallest magnetic storage device.

It’s a breakthrough that’s not likely to make its way into hard drives or memory sticks for decades, but it gives us a hint at how much road lies ahead for magnetic storage devices.

Before now, physicists really didn’t know how small they could take magnetic storage before the laws of quantum mechanics would take over, making it impossible to reliably store data. String together 8 atoms, for example, and you simply can’t get a stable magnetic state, says Andreas Heinrich, the IBM researcher behind the discovery. “The system will just spontaneously hop from one of those states to another state in a timescale that is too fast for us to claim anything like a data storage [demonstration]. It might be switching 1,000 times per second.”

Tele-Present Water by David Bowen

I rarely use the phrase ‘mind blown’, but this is one of those rare occurrences.

An art installation which combines real-time data, mechanical puppetry, and a physical grid representation usually employed virtually with computers:

This installation draws information from the intensity and movement of the water in a remote location. Wave data is being collected in real-time from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data buoy station 46246, 49.985 N 145.089 W (49°59’7” N 145°5’20” W) on the Pacific Ocean. The wave intensity and frequency is scaled and transferred to the mechanical grid structure resulting in a simulation of the physical effects caused by the movement of water from halfway around the world.

Link to the artist’s website for this work can be found here

via prostheticknowledge:

German Physicists: Historic Low Arctic Ice is a “Consequence of Man-Made Global Warming with Global Consequences” @ Climate Progress
Arctic Sea Ice Sets New Record Low in 2011 @ TreeHugger
environment editor John Vidal @ Guardian ~ Arctic sea ice is melting at its fastest pace in almost 40 years: The Northwest Passage was, again, free of ice this summer and the polar region could be unfrozen in just 30 years
via saveplanetearth:

German Physicists: Historic Low Arctic Ice is a “Consequence of Man-Made Global Warming with Global Consequences” @ Climate Progress

Arctic Sea Ice Sets New Record Low in 2011 @ TreeHugger

environment editor John Vidal @ Guardian ~ Arctic sea ice is melting at its fastest pace in almost 40 years: The Northwest Passage was, again, free of ice this summer and the polar region could be unfrozen in just 30 years

via saveplanetearth:

Transmitting high-speed data via LED room lights | KurzweilAI
Scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI) in Berlin have developed a new high-speed data transmission technology for video data.
Using an optical WLAN, the scientists were able to transfer data at a rate of 100 megabits per second over a ten square meters area without any loss, by modulating white LEDs in the ceiling.
The scientists were able to transfer four videos at HD quality to four different laptops at the same time. A simple photodiode on the laptop or other devices acts as a receiver.One disadvantage is that when something gets between the light and the photodiode, the transfer is impaired.
The new transmission technology is suitable for hospitals, where high data rates are required, but radio transmissions are not allowed — it could allow for controlling wireless surgical robots or sending x-ray images. In airplanes, passenger could view their own entertainment program on a display, saving aircraft manufacturers the cost and weight of miles of cables

Transmitting high-speed data via LED room lights | KurzweilAI

Scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI) in Berlin have developed a new high-speed data transmission technology for video data.

Using an optical WLAN, the scientists were able to transfer data at a rate of 100 megabits per second over a ten square meters area without any loss, by modulating white LEDs in the ceiling.

The scientists were able to transfer four videos at HD quality to four different laptops at the same time. A simple photodiode on the laptop or other devices acts as a receiver.One disadvantage is that when something gets between the light and the photodiode, the transfer is impaired.

The new transmission technology is suitable for hospitals, where high data rates are required, but radio transmissions are not allowed — it could allow for controlling wireless surgical robots or sending x-ray images. In airplanes, passenger could view their own entertainment program on a display, saving aircraft manufacturers the cost and weight of miles of cables

 Why Mobile Data Collection Works: An Interview With George Muammar, World Food Programme | MobileActive.org
This podcast originally appeared in an edited form on The World Food Programme’s blog.The collection and analysis of information from the field is a big part of ensuring that programs are working correctly. Recently, journalist Justin Smith interviewed George Mu’ammar of the World Food Programme’s Vulnerability Assessment and Mapping Unit on how his department uses mobile technology to collect data. Listen to the podcast below:

 Why Mobile Data Collection Works: An Interview With George Muammar, World Food Programme | MobileActive.org

This podcast originally appeared in an edited form on The World Food Programme’s blog.

The collection and analysis of information from the field is a big part of ensuring that programs are working correctly. Recently, journalist Justin Smith interviewed George Mu’ammar of the World Food Programme’s Vulnerability Assessment and Mapping Unit on how his department uses mobile technology to collect data. Listen to the podcast below:

Customers use social networks, mobile devices, Web sites and influencers to make buying decisions today. These businesses must connect to these customers where and how they prefer to buy to be successful. At the same time, they need to make sure they have the means of effectively managing their supplier and trading partner network to ensure they have the products at the right time and place to meet this new customer demand.

Quote from Craig Hayman, General Manager, IBM Industry Solutions, found at IBM Unveils Smarter Commerce Software and Services Offerings
A  special report on managing information: The open society | The  Economist
Now citizens and non-governmental organisations the world over are pressing to get access to public data at the national, state and municipal level—and sometimes government officials enthusiastically support them. “Government information is a form of infrastructure, no less important to our modern life than our roads, electrical grid or water systems,” says Carl Malamud, the boss of a group called Public.Resource.Org that puts government data online

A special report on managing information: The open society | The Economist

Now citizens and non-governmental organisations the world over are pressing to get access to public data at the national, state and municipal level—and sometimes government officials enthusiastically support them. “Government information is a form of infrastructure, no less important to our modern life than our roads, electrical grid or water systems,” says Carl Malamud, the boss of a group called Public.Resource.Org that puts government data online