Hangouts With James Fee: The Future of GIS - Spatially Adjusted

This week we talked about the future of GIS. 

Next week? The always entertaining Sean Gorman and I will talk about real time visualization of spatial data and if we ask nicely what is in store for GeoIQ.

Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds | Climate Central
While temperatures have been blistering this summer, this video takes the longer historical view. It comes to us from our friends at NASA and is an amazing 26-second animation depicting how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1880. That year is what scientists call the beginning of the “modern record.” You’ll note an acceleration of those temperatures in the late 1970s as greenhouse gas emissions from energy production increased worldwide and clean air laws reduced emissions of pollutants that had a cooling effect on the climate, and thus were masking some of the global warming signal. The data come from NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, which monitors global surface temperatures. As NASA notes, “in this animation, reds indicate temperatures higher than the average during a baseline period of 1951-1980, while blues indicate lower temperatures than the baseline average.” 

Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds | Climate Central

While temperatures have been blistering this summer, this video takes the longer historical view. It comes to us from our friends at NASA and is an amazing 26-second animation depicting how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1880. That year is what scientists call the beginning of the “modern record.” You’ll note an acceleration of those temperatures in the late 1970s as greenhouse gas emissions from energy production increased worldwide and clean air laws reduced emissions of pollutants that had a cooling effect on the climate, and thus were masking some of the global warming signal. The data come from NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, which monitors global surface temperatures. As NASA notes, “in this animation, reds indicate temperatures higher than the average during a baseline period of 1951-1980, while blues indicate lower temperatures than the baseline average.” 

David McCandless: The beauty of data visualization (by TEDEducation)

David McCandless turns complex data sets (like worldwide military spending, media buzz, Facebook status updates) into beautiful, simple diagrams that tease out unseen patterns and connections. Good design, he suggests, is the best way to navigate information glut — and it may just change the way we see the world.

David McCandless draws beautiful conclusions from complex datasets — thus revealing unexpected insights into our world.

Google plots the 20-year evolution of the Web | CNET News
As part of its Google I/O extravaganza, Google released an interactive visualization that tracks the evolution of the Web over the last 20 years in terms of user and data growth, as well as the core Web technologies that have driven the transformation of the Internet from plain old HTML to a rich, interactive medium.

Google plots the 20-year evolution of the Web | CNET News

As part of its Google I/O extravaganza, Google released an interactive visualization that tracks the evolution of the Web over the last 20 years in terms of user and data growth, as well as the core Web technologies that have driven the transformation of the Internet from plain old HTML to a rich, interactive medium.

A Visualization of March’s Record-Breaking Heat: 15,000 Records in the U.S.

March 2012 goes down as the warmest on record. NOAA data showed 7,755 daytime and 7,517 nighttime temperature records in the month of March. This visualization shows them in sequence.

(via The Atlantic)

via jtotheizzoe:

That map you see above isn’t a picture of the earth, seen from space. Rather, it’s a map of the locations attached to every tweet and Flickr photo. What results is a remarkable picture of how each service has spread across the globe. 
Infographic Of The Day: Using Twitter And Flickr Geotags To Map The World | Co.Design

That map you see above isn’t a picture of the earth, seen from space. Rather, it’s a map of the locations attached to every tweet and Flickr photo. What results is a remarkable picture of how each service has spread across the globe. 

Infographic Of The Day: Using Twitter And Flickr Geotags To Map The World | Co.Design