Winning World Wide | The IBM Research & GBS Data Visualization Prototype

What does a year of business wins — thousands of client projects from across every industry and around the world — look like for IBM’s consulting organization?

Based on actual data from GBS Sales Operations over the past 12 months, this big data visualization prototype by IBM Research and GBS Communications brings the velocity, volume and variety of all this real-world work to life, in 3D geography and a global mapping.mode.

Tiny New Satellite Produces Beautiful Global Vegetation Map - Wired Science
A satellite barely bigger than a washing machine and launched just two months ago has already made this great map of the world’s vegetation. 
The Belgian-built satellite called Proba-V is the latest in the European Space Agency’s PROBA series of small satellites and will take over vegetation monitoring duties from the Spot-4 and Spot-5 satellites, which are at the end of a 15-year mission.
Proba-V will circle the Earth 14 times a day, covering the entire globe every two days with its 100-meter resolution camera. Every 10 days, a new 200,000 megapixel image of the world’s vegetation will be produced.

Tiny New Satellite Produces Beautiful Global Vegetation Map - Wired Science

A satellite barely bigger than a washing machine and launched just two months ago has already made this great map of the world’s vegetation. 

The Belgian-built satellite called Proba-V is the latest in the European Space Agency’s PROBA series of small satellites and will take over vegetation monitoring duties from the Spot-4 and Spot-5 satellites, which are at the end of a 15-year mission.

Proba-V will circle the Earth 14 times a day, covering the entire globe every two days with its 100-meter resolution camera. Every 10 days, a new 200,000 megapixel image of the world’s vegetation will be produced.

Garmin HUD projects directions onto your windshield | The Car Tech blog
Smartphones have pretty much taken over as the default navigation tool for many drivers. However, some locales (including our home state of California) have outright banned smartphone use in the  car: no windshield mounts, no dashboard cradles. So, how are you going to get your turn-by-turn directions when looking at your phone is illegal? Today, Garmin announced a new way to interact with its StreetPilot and Navigon smartphone navigation apps: the HUD.
HUD — short for head-up display — sits on the dashboard at the base of the windshield, where it projects navigation data upwards into the driver’s line of sight, either onto a transparent film affixed to the windshield glass or a reflector lens that attaches to the HUD device. Both the film and reflector lens are included with the device.
Garmin states that HUD will automatically adjust the brightness of its projections, so that the display remains visible in direct sunlight or at night. The device will be powered by a 12V charging cable with an integrated USB port for keeping your smartphone charged as well.

Garmin HUD projects directions onto your windshield | The Car Tech blog

Smartphones have pretty much taken over as the default navigation tool for many drivers. However, some locales (including our home state of California) have outright banned smartphone use in the car: no windshield mounts, no dashboard cradles. So, how are you going to get your turn-by-turn directions when looking at your phone is illegal? Today, Garmin announced a new way to interact with its StreetPilot and Navigon smartphone navigation apps: the HUD.

HUD — short for head-up display — sits on the dashboard at the base of the windshield, where it projects navigation data upwards into the driver’s line of sight, either onto a transparent film affixed to the windshield glass or a reflector lens that attaches to the HUD device. Both the film and reflector lens are included with the device.

Garmin states that HUD will automatically adjust the brightness of its projections, so that the display remains visible in direct sunlight or at night. The device will be powered by a 12V charging cable with an integrated USB port for keeping your smartphone charged as well.

Kinect Installation Lets Visitors Control A Living Human Cell [Video] - PSFK
Living Cell is an interactive installation created by design agency Clever Franke for the research group Eriba Institute.
The data visualisation work allows you to physically step inside a cell, walk around its organelles and influence its processes. Visitors can discover information about specific parts of the cell by walking into the cell and touching the part of interest. The lifetime of the cell is approximately an hour; if there is no interference from the visitors eventually the cell will die and be born again.

Kinect Installation Lets Visitors Control A Living Human Cell [Video] - PSFK

Living Cell is an interactive installation created by design agency Clever Franke for the research group Eriba Institute.

The data visualisation work allows you to physically step inside a cell, walk around its organelles and influence its processes. Visitors can discover information about specific parts of the cell by walking into the cell and touching the part of interest. The lifetime of the cell is approximately an hour; if there is no interference from the visitors eventually the cell will die and be born again.

The Art of Data Visualization | Off Book | PBS

Humans have a powerful capacity to process visual information, skills that date far back in our evolutionary lineage. And since the advent of science, we have employed intricate visual strategies to communicate data, often utilizing design principles that draw on these basic cognitive skills. In a modern world where we have far more data than we can process, the practice of data visualization has gained even more importance. From scientific visualization to pop infographics, designers are increasingly tasked with incorporating data into the media experience. Data has emerged as such a critical part of modern life that it has entered into the realm of art, where data-driven visual experiences challenge viewers to find personal meaning from a sea of information, a task that is increasingly present in every aspect of our information-infused lives.

Visualize Global Health | Humanosphere
It’s a new dawn for global health data borne of necessity, mind-numbing numbers, Netflix and a desire to avoid insanity.
“For our own sanity, we needed to create a new way to look at this stuff,” said Peter Speyer.
Speyer, head of data development at Seattle’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, explained why he and his colleagues are transforming a massive collection of health data known as the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) into a stunning collection of powerful online and interactive visual tools. Go to the link; below is just a screen grab. Seriously, go there and try these out. You’ll have fun even if you don’t know yet what you’re doing.

Visualize Global Health | Humanosphere

It’s a new dawn for global health data borne of necessity, mind-numbing numbers, Netflix and a desire to avoid insanity.

“For our own sanity, we needed to create a new way to look at this stuff,” said Peter Speyer.

Speyer, head of data development at Seattle’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, explained why he and his colleagues are transforming a massive collection of health data known as the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) into a stunning collection of powerful online and interactive visual tools. Go to the link; below is just a screen grab. Seriously, go there and try these out. You’ll have fun even if you don’t know yet what you’re doing.

The World’s Tweets Light Up the Globe in Stunning Live Visualization | Wired Design | Wired.com
It’s simple, but lovely. Web designer Franck Ernewein‘s real-time Twitter visualization, Tweetping, drops a bright pixel at the location of every tweet in the world, starting as soon as you open the page.
The result is a constantly changing image that grows to look like a nighttime satellite shot, bright spots swarming over the most developed areas. But Ernewein has packaged it all in a subtly interactive visualization that avoids distracting the viewer while still imparting a great amount of information.

The World’s Tweets Light Up the Globe in Stunning Live Visualization | Wired Design | Wired.com

It’s simple, but lovely. Web designer Franck Ernewein‘s real-time Twitter visualization, Tweetping, drops a bright pixel at the location of every tweet in the world, starting as soon as you open the page.

The result is a constantly changing image that grows to look like a nighttime satellite shot, bright spots swarming over the most developed areas. But Ernewein has packaged it all in a subtly interactive visualization that avoids distracting the viewer while still imparting a great amount of information.

The Changing Goals of Data Visualization | eagereyes
The visual representation of data has gone through a number of phases, with its goals switching back and forth between analysis and presentation over time. Many introductions to visualization tend to portray historical examples as all being done for the same purpose. That, I argue in this short, incomplete, and cherry-picked history, is not true.
Early to Mid–1800s: Playfair, Nightingale, Snow, Minard
The first uses of graphics to represent data, interestingly, were very bare and abstract, and at the same time were mostly tools for communication. The abstract nature of these early charts is surprising when you consider the amount of ornamentation and decoration that was common with even simple household objects in the early to middle of the 19th century. John Snow’s and Charles Minard’s maps were downright stark compared with many maps drawn at the time.

The Changing Goals of Data Visualization | eagereyes

The visual representation of data has gone through a number of phases, with its goals switching back and forth between analysis and presentation over time. Many introductions to visualization tend to portray historical examples as all being done for the same purpose. That, I argue in this short, incomplete, and cherry-picked history, is not true.

Early to Mid–1800s: Playfair, Nightingale, Snow, Minard

The first uses of graphics to represent data, interestingly, were very bare and abstract, and at the same time were mostly tools for communication. The abstract nature of these early charts is surprising when you consider the amount of ornamentation and decoration that was common with even simple household objects in the early to middle of the 19th century. John Snow’s and Charles Minard’s maps were downright stark compared with many maps drawn at the time.

A Visualization of NYC’s Frantic Transit Patterns Over 24 Hours

Using data from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, this animation tracks public transportation on a weekday, starting at 4am. Sumus, the Canadian software company behind these visualizations, uses the General Transit Feed Specification data from various cities to create a whole series of videos that you can check out on YouTube. Be sure to watch full screen in 720 HD to see the movement of subways and buses (which appear to be color-coded to match the corresponding lines). 

(via theatlantic)

Visualizing Every Single Carbon Emission In Your City | Co.Exist
Hestia is a new project that lets you see the whole picture of emissions, from that SUV idling at a red light to the power plant down the block.
We know, in the aggregate, that highways and buildings produce a lot of carbon. All those cars and trucks, and all those office towers and shopping malls—with their heating systems, and lighting, and appliances: It all adds up. No doubt. But that highway and that building and that airport? And how they compare? You can’t really appreciate it until you have good data, and, even more important, a good way of visualizing it.

Visualizing Every Single Carbon Emission In Your City | Co.Exist

Hestia is a new project that lets you see the whole picture of emissions, from that SUV idling at a red light to the power plant down the block.

We know, in the aggregate, that highways and buildings produce a lot of carbon. All those cars and trucks, and all those office towers and shopping malls—with their heating systems, and lighting, and appliances: It all adds up. No doubt. But that highway and that building and that airport? And how they compare? You can’t really appreciate it until you have good data, and, even more important, a good way of visualizing it.