30 Open Data Resources - semanticweb.com
Romy Misra has posted a list of thirty places to find open data on the web …
Misra starts the list with a few government and political data resources: “Data.gov: This is the  go-to resource for government-related data. It claims to have up to 400,000 data sets, both raw data and geo spatial, in a variety of formats. The only caveat in using the data sets is you have to make sure you clean them, since many have missing values and characters. Socrata is another good place to explore government-related data. One great thing about Socrata is they have some visualization tools that make exploring the data easier.”
Find the rest of the list here.
Image: Courtesy Flickr/ schoschie

30 Open Data Resources - semanticweb.com

Romy Misra has posted a list of thirty places to find open data on the web …

Misra starts the list with a few government and political data resources: “Data.gov: This is the  go-to resource for government-related data. It claims to have up to 400,000 data sets, both raw data and geo spatial, in a variety of formats. The only caveat in using the data sets is you have to make sure you clean them, since many have missing values and characters. Socrata is another good place to explore government-related data. One great thing about Socrata is they have some visualization tools that make exploring the data easier.”

Find the rest of the list here.

Image: Courtesy Flickr/ schoschie


We’re in open government’s beta period

As Congress returns to Washington after this weekend’s somber anniversary, the conversation on Capitol will inevitably shift to the midterm elections. The White House is faced with high unemployment, the long war abroad and domestic priorities that range from education to energy policy to immigration to cybersecurity.

In that context, it might be easy for citizens and officials alike to let deep discussion of open government be subsumed under the tsunami of partisan rancor, entertainment news and horse race coverage of the elections. That would be a mistake. There are legitimate arguments to be had about the tech policy choices of Congress and the White House, and they will no doubt be on display in the pages of the country’s newspapers and hotly debated in comment threads.

What’s not in contention, however, is the exploration of technology-enabled platforms for a government of, by, for and with the people. This deserves close scrutiny.