A Cheap, Rugged Tablet Is Your Kid’s Next Fixation | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
Forget phablets. Touchscreen Android devices designed expressly for kids with bright colors, durable cases and rubberized surfaces are making a big splash in the tablet space.
Tablets certainly are a hot-ticket item. Apple was projected to sell 62 million iPads in 2012, and Android tablet sales were up 177 percent this holiday season. But while some parents are only too happy to share their $500-plus tablets with the kids (or even buy the kiddos iPads of their own), some are opting instead to get a tablet designed specifically for their wee ones’ tiny fingers and eager minds.

A Cheap, Rugged Tablet Is Your Kid’s Next Fixation | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

Forget phablets. Touchscreen Android devices designed expressly for kids with bright colors, durable cases and rubberized surfaces are making a big splash in the tablet space.

Tablets certainly are a hot-ticket item. Apple was projected to sell 62 million iPads in 2012, and Android tablet sales were up 177 percent this holiday season. But while some parents are only too happy to share their $500-plus tablets with the kids (or even buy the kiddos iPads of their own), some are opting instead to get a tablet designed specifically for their wee ones’ tiny fingers and eager minds.

Tablets ‘one of the fastest-growing technologies in history’ - Telegraph

One in four smartphone owners used a tablet between February and April this year, an increase of 14 per cent over last year.


"Once consumers get their hands on their first tablet, they are using them for any number of media habits," said Mark Donovan, Senior Vice President of Mobile at market research firm comScore.

Tablets ‘one of the fastest-growing technologies in history’ - Telegraph

One in four smartphone owners used a tablet between February and April this year, an increase of 14 per cent over last year.

"Once consumers get their hands on their first tablet, they are using them for any number of media habits," said Mark Donovan, Senior Vice President of Mobile at market research firm comScore.

Wood stoves convert waste heat into electricity for charging small devices

Nearly half of the world’s population cooks over open wood fires, but such fires are inefficient, waste energy and create toxic smoke that’s a hazard both to the environment and to human health. Like Inyenyeri, New York-based BioLite aims to offer something better — specifically, stoves that use half the wood, emit only a fraction of the smoke, and capture excess heat to generate electricity for other purposes. READ MORE…

via springwise:

Wood stoves convert waste heat into electricity for charging small devices

Nearly half of the world’s population cooks over open wood fires, but such fires are inefficient, waste energy and create toxic smoke that’s a hazard both to the environment and to human health. Like Inyenyeri, New York-based BioLite aims to offer something better — specifically, stoves that use half the wood, emit only a fraction of the smoke, and capture excess heat to generate electricity for other purposes. READ MORE…

via springwise:

We’ve seen electricity-monitoring / controlling devices similar to the EnergyHub before, but few have provided such a handsome interface or modular, expandable options. The device uses a touchscreen control panel (familiarly referred to as a “dashboard”) to help gauge and adjust energy levels for satellite outlets that it communicates with. The data will be accessible and adjustable online, and users will also be able to compare their stats with other eco-tweakers or neighbors. The company claims the devices could reduce energy costs by 20 percent for homes that employ the system. There’s no word on a release date or pricing, but we’ll keep you abreast of any exciting developments. (via EnergyHub minds your electricity, saves you cash)

We’ve seen electricity-monitoring / controlling devices similar to the EnergyHub before, but few have provided such a handsome interface or modular, expandable options. The device uses a touchscreen control panel (familiarly referred to as a “dashboard”) to help gauge and adjust energy levels for satellite outlets that it communicates with. The data will be accessible and adjustable online, and users will also be able to compare their stats with other eco-tweakers or neighbors. The company claims the devices could reduce energy costs by 20 percent for homes that employ the system. There’s no word on a release date or pricing, but we’ll keep you abreast of any exciting developments. (via EnergyHub minds your electricity, saves you cash)

77 percent of people with Wi-Fi-enabled mobile phones are completely or very satisfied with their devices. Among those who have Wi-Fi on their phones, 74 percent use the feature, and 77 percent say they will also seek Wi-Fi connectivity in their next phone. (via Survey: Wi-Fi becoming smartphone must-have | CNET)

77 percent of people with Wi-Fi-enabled mobile phones are completely or very satisfied with their devices. Among those who have Wi-Fi on their phones, 74 percent use the feature, and 77 percent say they will also seek Wi-Fi connectivity in their next phone. (via Survey: Wi-Fi becoming smartphone must-have | CNET)

During the next five years we will see more amazing developments that will allow the fabrication of structures, devices, and circuits with structures and patterns down to 20nm or smaller using room-temperature and non-vacuum processes. These nanomanufacturing processes incorporate nanoelements (such as nanotubes, nanowires, nanoparticles, proteins, DNA, drugs, etc.) to build structures and patterns that can be used for electronics, energy, materials, or biotechnology products; they utilize directed and self-assembly to make devices (electronics or NEMs), sensors, medical devices, energy harvesting, and storage applications. (via Small Times - Nanotechnology enables a major manufacturing paradigm shift)

During the next five years we will see more amazing developments that will allow the fabrication of structures, devices, and circuits with structures and patterns down to 20nm or smaller using room-temperature and non-vacuum processes. These nanomanufacturing processes incorporate nanoelements (such as nanotubes, nanowires, nanoparticles, proteins, DNA, drugs, etc.) to build structures and patterns that can be used for electronics, energy, materials, or biotechnology products; they utilize directed and self-assembly to make devices (electronics or NEMs), sensors, medical devices, energy harvesting, and storage applications. (via Small Times - Nanotechnology enables a major manufacturing paradigm shift)

The first electronic product using carbon nanotubes is slated to hit the market this year. Unidym, a startup based in Menlo Park, CA, plans to start selling rolls of its carbon-nanotube-coated plastic films in the second half of 2009. (via Technology Review: Clear Carbon-Nanotube Films)

The transparent, conductive films could make manufacturing LCD screens faster and cheaper. They could enhance the life of touch panels used in ATM screens and supermarket kiosks. They might also pave the way for flexible thin-film solar cells and bright, roll-up color displays. The displays could be used in cell phones, billboards, and electronic books and magazines.

The first electronic product using carbon nanotubes is slated to hit the market this year. Unidym, a startup based in Menlo Park, CA, plans to start selling rolls of its carbon-nanotube-coated plastic films in the second half of 2009. (via Technology Review: Clear Carbon-Nanotube Films)

The transparent, conductive films could make manufacturing LCD screens faster and cheaper. They could enhance the life of touch panels used in ATM screens and supermarket kiosks. They might also pave the way for flexible thin-film solar cells and bright, roll-up color displays. The displays could be used in cell phones, billboards, and electronic books and magazines.

Judging by some displays at the Detroit auto show, the car, too, is becoming an extension of personal electronic devices, more like an Apple iPhone than a complex collection of mechanical bits. (via Dashboards That Promise to Do More Than Inform - NYTimes.com)

Judging by some displays at the Detroit auto show, the car, too, is becoming an extension of personal electronic devices, more like an Apple iPhone than a complex collection of mechanical bits. (via Dashboards That Promise to Do More Than Inform - NYTimes.com)

Most of the devices on display this year [at the Consumer Electronics Show] are not electronic islands. Nearly everything is a little computer that wants to seek out and connect to other computerized devices, no matter who makes them. Then they will send your music, photos and video around your home, and get even more from the Internet.

NYTimes on CES: This Year, It’s All About Interconnected Devices

(Posted via Blackberry 8830 on NJ Transit commuter train)