NEA-Backed Omada Health Launches Its 16-Week Digital Health Program To Bring Diabetes Prevention Online | TechCrunch

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Last December, Omada Health raised $800K in seed funding from a host of angel and venture investors, including NEA, Aberdare, Kapor Capital, TriplePoint Ventures and Esther Dyson — to name a few. A graduate of Rock Health’s first batch, the startup started out on a mission to take on diabetes (and prediabetes) by leveraging the latest research, design, behavioral science and digital technology.

Today, after nearly a year in development and testing, Omada Health is launching Prevent, what the company is calling the “first-ever online diabetes prevention program for the general public.” Why? Because Diabetes is one of the most widespread diseases in the U.S., with the CDC estimating that 79 million American adults have prediabetes. That’s one in three adults, and the majority of them people aren’t aware of their condition, as they have blood glucose levels that aren’t irregular enough to be considered diabetes yet indicate an extremely high risk.

‘Tattoo’  may help diabetics track their blood sugar
Strano and Barone’s sensing system consists of a “tattoo” of nanoparticles designed to detect glucose, injected below the skin. A device similar to a wristwatch would be worn over the tattoo, displaying the patient’s glucose levels.

‘Tattoo’ may help diabetics track their blood sugar

Strano and Barone’s sensing system consists of a “tattoo” of nanoparticles designed to detect glucose, injected below the skin. A device similar to a wristwatch would be worn over the tattoo, displaying the patient’s glucose levels.

Scientists at Draper Laboratory, in Cambridge, MA, are developing a nanosensor that could be injected into the skin, much like tattoo dye, to monitor an individual’s blood-sugar level. As the glucose level increases, the “tattoo” would fluoresce under an infrared light, telling a diabetic whether or not she needs an insulin shot following a meal. (via Technology Review: The Glucose-Monitoring Tattoo)

Scientists at Draper Laboratory, in Cambridge, MA, are developing a nanosensor that could be injected into the skin, much like tattoo dye, to monitor an individual’s blood-sugar level. As the glucose level increases, the “tattoo” would fluoresce under an infrared light, telling a diabetic whether or not she needs an insulin shot following a meal. (via Technology Review: The Glucose-Monitoring Tattoo)

Implantable Glucose Control Chip
MicroCHIPS’ technology is based on proprietary reservoir arrays that are used to store and protect chemical sensors or potent drugs within the body for long periods of time. These arrays are designed for compatibility with preprogrammed microprocessors, wireless telemetry, or sensor feedback loops to provide active control. Individual device reservoirs can be opened on demand or on a predetermined schedule to precisely control drug release or sensor activation. (via Continuous MicroCHIPS Glucose Monitoring Shows Promise)

Implantable Glucose Control Chip

MicroCHIPS’ technology is based on proprietary reservoir arrays that are used to store and protect chemical sensors or potent drugs within the body for long periods of time. These arrays are designed for compatibility with preprogrammed microprocessors, wireless telemetry, or sensor feedback loops to provide active control. Individual device reservoirs can be opened on demand or on a predetermined schedule to precisely control drug release or sensor activation. (via Continuous MicroCHIPS Glucose Monitoring Shows Promise)