MRI Technology Detects Diseases In Seconds Rather Than Hours - PSFK
A typical MRI body scan is a difficult process which involves lying motionless in a tight space often for hours at a time. Imagine if that time could be shortened not only to minutes, but mere seconds. On your next visit to the doctors office, complex scanning procedures could be accomplished quickly and painlessly.
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland say that after a decade of work they’ve developed a new MRI (magnetic resonance imagining) technique that can scan for those diseases very quickly. In just 12 seconds, for instance, it may be possible to differentiate white from gray matter in cerebrospinal fluid in the brain; in a matter of minutes, a full-body scan would provide far more data, making diagnostics considerably easier and less expensive than today’s scans.

MRI Technology Detects Diseases In Seconds Rather Than Hours - PSFK

A typical MRI body scan is a difficult process which involves lying motionless in a tight space often for hours at a time. Imagine if that time could be shortened not only to minutes, but mere seconds. On your next visit to the doctors office, complex scanning procedures could be accomplished quickly and painlessly.

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland say that after a decade of work they’ve developed a new MRI (magnetic resonance imagining) technique that can scan for those diseases very quickly. In just 12 seconds, for instance, it may be possible to differentiate white from gray matter in cerebrospinal fluid in the brain; in a matter of minutes, a full-body scan would provide far more data, making diagnostics considerably easier and less expensive than today’s scans.

IBM Watson: Transforming Healthcare (by IBM)

There are over 12,000 diseases in the world. Some take years to diagnose and treat. This, combined with medical knowledge that doubles every 5 years often makes it difficult for doctors to keep up. IBM is working on new solutions based on Watson to help doctors with faster and more accurate diagnoses.
To learn more, please visit http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/us/en/healthcare_solutions/ideas/index.html?….

Mobile app diagnoses malaria from a single drop of blood
The virtual ink had barely dried on our story about the Skin Scan app for diagnosing melanoma when we received word of another, equally  compelling mobile diagnostic tool. Focusing this time on the millions of  people at risk from malaria in sub-Saharan Africa and other parts of  the world, Lifelens is a project that has created a smartphone app to diagnose the insidious, mosquito-borne disease. READ MORE…
via springwise:

Mobile app diagnoses malaria from a single drop of blood

The virtual ink had barely dried on our story about the Skin Scan app for diagnosing melanoma when we received word of another, equally compelling mobile diagnostic tool. Focusing this time on the millions of people at risk from malaria in sub-Saharan Africa and other parts of the world, Lifelens is a project that has created a smartphone app to diagnose the insidious, mosquito-borne disease. READ MORE…

via springwise:

iPhone/Android app allows doctors to quickly diagnose stroke | KurzweilAI
Doctors can now make a stroke diagnosis using an iPhone/Android app  with close to the same accuracy as a diagnosis at a medical computer  workstation, researchers from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Medicine have shown in a new study.
The  Resolution MD Mobile app lets physicians view and manipulate remote  medical images in high-resolution 3-D on the iPhone or Android phone,  allowing for a quick diagnosis for the treatment of stroke, cardiac  arrest, or other emergencies. The app allows for real-time access to  specialists such as neurologists, regardless of where the physicians and  patients are located, and is particularly well-suited for rural medical  settings.

iPhone/Android app allows doctors to quickly diagnose stroke | KurzweilAI

Doctors can now make a stroke diagnosis using an iPhone/Android app with close to the same accuracy as a diagnosis at a medical computer workstation, researchers from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Medicine have shown in a new study.

The Resolution MD Mobile app lets physicians view and manipulate remote medical images in high-resolution 3-D on the iPhone or Android phone, allowing for a quick diagnosis for the treatment of stroke, cardiac arrest, or other emergencies. The app allows for real-time access to specialists such as neurologists, regardless of where the physicians and patients are located, and is particularly well-suited for rural medical settings.

Computer Wins on ‘Jeopardy!’: Trivial, It’s Not

For I.B.M., the future will happen very quickly, company executives said. On Thursday it plans to announce that it will collaborate with Columbia University and theUniversity of Maryland to create a physician’s assistant service that will allow doctors to query a cybernetic assistant. The company also plans to work with Nuance Communications Inc. to add voice recognition to the physician’s assistant, possibly making the service available in as little as 18 months.

“I have been in medical education for 40 years and we’re still a very memory-based curriculum,” said Dr. Herbert Chase, a professor of clinical medicine at Columbia University who is working with I.B.M. on the physician’s assistant. “The power of Watson- like tools will cause us to reconsider what it is we want students to do.”

(Read more on nytimes.com)

 Doctors Diagnosing Patients with New iPhone App
A new iPhone application is helping local doctors. The new diagnostic tool was created by a Rochester company. Logical Images says it is being used at 1,300 locations nationwide, and it was released just two weeks ago. Dr. Steven Howard recently diagnosed a patient with the new “app” at his Fairport office.

 Doctors Diagnosing Patients with New iPhone App

A new iPhone application is helping local doctors. The new diagnostic tool was created by a Rochester company. Logical Images says it is being used at 1,300 locations nationwide, and it was released just two weeks ago. Dr. Steven Howard recently diagnosed a patient with the new “app” at his Fairport office.

New Technology Promises Compact High-Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound

A Cornell graduate student in biomedical engineering built a pocket-sized high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound. The researchers hope that the new technology, now undergoing animal trials, one day will make it into portable clinical devices that could “stabilize a gunshot wound or deliver drugs to brain cancer patients.

New Technology Promises Compact High-Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound