The Digitalization of Healthcare: A Status Report for American Health Information Technology

Speaker/Performer: Michael Minear, CIO, UC Davis Health System

Sponsor: CITRIS (Ctr for Info Technology Research in the Interest of Society)

Michael Minear, Chief Information Officer at the UC Davis Medical Center, is a national leader in health-care information technology. He has an extensive record of leading transformations of large, complex organizations in the use of modern information technology.

Electronic Medical Records Finally Become a Reality, Thanks to the iPad
Digital health is a hot market right now, with funding levels having tripled over the past year. Y Combinator graduate drchrono is one of many scrappy young startups aiming to change the stodgy old healthcare system. Indeed, drchrono strikes at one of the core problems of traditional healthcare: paperwork. Drchrono is an EMR (Electronic Medical Record) solution for doctors, optimized for the iPad and also available on iPhone and the Web.
Drchrono has a wide range of features; including scheduling an appointment, inputting medical details, eprescribing, billing, and Medical Speech to Text technology. Perhaps the best feature is that the patient can get a copy of their medical records, via the app.

Electronic Medical Records Finally Become a Reality, Thanks to the iPad

Digital health is a hot market right now, with funding levels having tripled over the past year. Y Combinator graduate drchrono is one of many scrappy young startups aiming to change the stodgy old healthcare system. Indeed, drchrono strikes at one of the core problems of traditional healthcare: paperwork. Drchrono is an EMR (Electronic Medical Record) solution for doctors, optimized for the iPad and also available on iPhone and the Web.

Drchrono has a wide range of features; including scheduling an appointment, inputting medical details, eprescribing, billing, and Medical Speech to Text technology. Perhaps the best feature is that the patient can get a copy of their medical records, via the app.

Mobile Health: AgaMatrix iPhone glucose monitor | MedTech
This is an awesome device that turns the iPhone into your own personal  blood glucose meter. Well…that’s boring right? My glucose meter does  that right now. Not quite. With iPhone being directly linked to current  wireless technology the app for iBGStar automatically logs data and  sends it to the office of your health care professional so that data is  available for review is a precise format. This way your healthcare  professional can analyse the data as it comes in and make decisions to  optimize the patient’s dosage and other medical management without the  patient coming to the office.

Mobile Health: AgaMatrix iPhone glucose monitor | MedTech

This is an awesome device that turns the iPhone into your own personal blood glucose meter. Well…that’s boring right? My glucose meter does that right now. Not quite. With iPhone being directly linked to current wireless technology the app for iBGStar automatically logs data and sends it to the office of your health care professional so that data is available for review is a precise format. This way your healthcare professional can analyse the data as it comes in and make decisions to optimize the patient’s dosage and other medical management without the patient coming to the office.

Kaiser Permanente Patients Can Now View Their Records on Mobile Devices | MakeUseOf
Last week, Kaiser Permanente released a new app for Android and iPhone devices that will allow its patients to access their own medication information and records through a mobile-optimized website. Kaiser has the largest electronic medical record system in the world, with 9 million Kaiser Permanente patients.

Kaiser Permanente Patients Can Now View Their Records on Mobile Devices | MakeUseOf

Last week, Kaiser Permanente released a new app for Android and iPhone devices that will allow its patients to access their own medication information and records through a mobile-optimized website. Kaiser has the largest electronic medical record system in the world, with 9 million Kaiser Permanente patients.

Patient Data-Sharing Is Started By Big Medical Groups 
The ideal of computerizing patient records is captured in the words behind the government’s aspirational acronym, N.H.I.N., for Nationwide Health Information Network.
The vision includes not only the efficient collection and use of  digitized patient records to help physicians make smarter, more  cost-effective diagnoses, but also the sharing of information by  far-flung doctors and hospitals. A person walks into a clinic in  Phoenix, say, and, with permission, her records from her hometown  physician’s office in San Francisco are efficiently summoned with a  mouse-click.
Across much of the country, that ambitious vision lies well in the  future. After all, only about one quarter of the nation’s doctors even  use computerized patient records today. The Obama administration is  offering billions of dollars in incentives over the next five years — up  to $44,000 per physician — to accelerate the adoption of electronic  health records.
But five leading medical groups — pioneers in the use of electronic  health records — are announcing on Wednesday a project intended to  exchange patient information. It is intended as an elite forerunner of  the national health information network, spanning several states and  millions of patients.
The five are Geisinger Health System, Kaiser Permanente, Mayo Clinic, Intermountain Healthcare and Group Health Cooperative. They are calling their project the Care Connectivity Consortium.
Source: NY Times

Patient Data-Sharing Is Started By Big Medical Groups

The ideal of computerizing patient records is captured in the words behind the government’s aspirational acronym, N.H.I.N., for Nationwide Health Information Network.

The vision includes not only the efficient collection and use of digitized patient records to help physicians make smarter, more cost-effective diagnoses, but also the sharing of information by far-flung doctors and hospitals. A person walks into a clinic in Phoenix, say, and, with permission, her records from her hometown physician’s office in San Francisco are efficiently summoned with a mouse-click.

Across much of the country, that ambitious vision lies well in the future. After all, only about one quarter of the nation’s doctors even use computerized patient records today. The Obama administration is offering billions of dollars in incentives over the next five years — up to $44,000 per physician — to accelerate the adoption of electronic health records.

But five leading medical groups — pioneers in the use of electronic health records — are announcing on Wednesday a project intended to exchange patient information. It is intended as an elite forerunner of the national health information network, spanning several states and millions of patients.

The five are Geisinger Health System, Kaiser Permanente, Mayo Clinic, Intermountain Healthcare and Group Health Cooperative. They are calling their project the Care Connectivity Consortium.

Source: NY Times

Computer Wins on ‘Jeopardy!’: Trivial, It’s Not

For I.B.M., the future will happen very quickly, company executives said. On Thursday it plans to announce that it will collaborate with Columbia University and theUniversity of Maryland to create a physician’s assistant service that will allow doctors to query a cybernetic assistant. The company also plans to work with Nuance Communications Inc. to add voice recognition to the physician’s assistant, possibly making the service available in as little as 18 months.

“I have been in medical education for 40 years and we’re still a very memory-based curriculum,” said Dr. Herbert Chase, a professor of clinical medicine at Columbia University who is working with I.B.M. on the physician’s assistant. “The power of Watson- like tools will cause us to reconsider what it is we want students to do.”

(Read more on nytimes.com)

Health 2.0 has pushed innovation in health care from its inception. From social networks for patients and providers to vertical search and mobile health tools, innovation continues. The Quantified Self represents the latest level of innovation for healthcare. The letters to the NY Times Sunday Magazine in response to the feature on The Data Driven Live, has this choice quote by Patricia Flatley Brennet of Project HealthDesign “Doctors are experts in clinical care; patients are experts in their daily experiences and how they make them feel. Both need to share more with each other.”

But some healthcare organizations have been innovative from the beginning. See the video on the Cleveland Clinic Model of Medicine and then read their latest Annual Report with President Obama on the cover. What a great place to work.

eHealth » John W. Sharp on eHealth and Health IT » A History of Innovation in Medicine

Wearable Wireless Sensor Market To Grow By 400 Million Devices

Around the world multiple social factors are putting strain on existing healthcare operations, but a new wave of interest and investment in wireless body sensors will help healthcare providers to improve treatment as well as increase efficiency and cut costs. Key to these benefits is the development of wireless sensors to measure important body parameters and communicate the data to remote systems. These developments are examined in a new study from ABI Research.

Source: Integrated Solutions

TEDMED 2009 to bring together the most innovative leaders and luminaries in health and medicine

KurzweilAI.net

Will your next surgeon be a robot? Can we end aging? What does a wireless band-aid do? These are among the issues addressed at the relaunch of the annual TEDMED, which is “bringing together the top leaders and luminaries from numerous disciplines that intersect the fields of medicine and healthcare,” TEDMED president Marc Hodosh told KurzweilAI.net.



TEDMED speakers include inventor Dean Kamen (“can a prosthesis be better than the real thing?”), pioneering genomic scientist Craig Venter on what we can do with synthetic life, White House special advisor Ezekiel Emanuel, M.D. on reforming healthcare in America, magician David Blaine on the science of holding his breath (for a world record 17 minutes and 4.4 seconds), eProteus CEO Andrew Thompson on a computer chip made from food ingredients in smart pills, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine director Anthony Atala, M.D. on growing bladders and other new organs, and David Sinclair on drugs to treat age-associated diseases.

Are the stars aligning for telemedicine’s succcess? | Business Tech - CNET News
While technology companies have been touting the use of virtual technology to allow doctors to remotely examine and monitor patients for decades, up until recently the business case for deploying these expensive systems was hard to justify. But now as lawmakers in Washington, D.C. look for ways to fix the broken health care system, technologies, such as high-definition video conferencing and telepresence, are getting a second look.

Are the stars aligning for telemedicine’s succcess? | Business Tech - CNET News

While technology companies have been touting the use of virtual technology to allow doctors to remotely examine and monitor patients for decades, up until recently the business case for deploying these expensive systems was hard to justify. But now as lawmakers in Washington, D.C. look for ways to fix the broken health care system, technologies, such as high-definition video conferencing and telepresence, are getting a second look.

Many technology advocates, including health policy specialists, say that networked electronic patient records that can be transmitted instantly would make health care more efficient and provide valuable insights about costs and care. Only a small minority of doctors use such technology to track the care they give people. Some health policy analysts have recommended the use of government subsidies and incentives to spur the adoption—as the stimulus spending is intended to do.

IBM, Google team up to port monitor data into health records

Imagine that you’ve just fallen into diabetic shock and no one is around to call an ambulance. Fortunately, your blood-sugar level is being constantly monitored and the results are sent wirelessly to your physician. Software triggers an alert and the doctor’s office calls for an ambulance.

IBM launches software that pushes monitor data into health records — Government Computer News