IBM saved $43 million in energy expenses last year, conserving 378,000 MWh of electricity and 326,000 million BTUs of fuel oil and natural gas through hundreds of conservation projects, according to the company’s 2011 corporate responsibility report. IBM’s energy conservation projects saved the equivalent of 7.4 percent of its total energy use, surpassing its corporate goal of 3.5 percent. These projects also avoided 175,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions.

The computing trend that will change everything | KurzweilAI
While the largest contributor to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is the power industry, the second largest is the more often overlooked cement industry, which accounts for 5-6% of all anthropogenic CO2emissions. For every 10 kg of cement produced, the cement industry releases a full 9 kg of CO2. Since the world consumes about 3 trillion kg of cement annually, this sector has one of the highest potentials for CO2 emission reductions. But while processes are being explored to sequester the CO2 from cement production, so far no process can completely eliminate it.

The computing trend that will change everything | KurzweilAI

While the largest contributor to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is the power industry, the second largest is the more often overlooked cement industry, which accounts for 5-6% of all anthropogenic CO2emissions. For every 10 kg of cement produced, the cement industry releases a full 9 kg of CO2. Since the world consumes about 3 trillion kg of cement annually, this sector has one of the highest potentials for CO2 emission reductions. But while processes are being explored to sequester the CO2 from cement production, so far no process can completely eliminate it.

We Can’t Wait: President Obama Announces Nearly $4 Billion Investment in Energy Upgrades to Public and Private Buildings | The White House
Upgrades Will Create Tens of Thousands of Jobs and Save Billions
President Obama today announced nearly $4 billion in combined federal and private sector energy  upgrades to buildings over the next 2 years. These investments will save  billions in energy costs, promote energy independence, and, according  to independent estimates, create tens of thousands of jobs in the  hard-hit construction sector. The $4 billion investment announced today  includes a $2 billion commitment, made through the issuance of a  Presidential Memorandum, to energy upgrades of federal buildings using  long term energy savings to pay for up-front costs, at no cost to  taxpayers. In addition, 60 CEOs, mayors, university presidents, and  labor leaders today committed to invest nearly $2 billion of private  capital into energy efficiency projects; and to upgrade energy  performance by a minimum of 20% by 2020 in 1.6 billion square feet of  office, industrial, municipal, hospital, university, community college  and school buildings. This announcement builds on a commitment made by  14 partners at the Clinton Global Initiative America meeting in June to  make energy upgrades across 300 million square feet, and to invest $500  million in private sector financing in energy efficiency projects.   Today’s commitments were announced by President Obama and former  President Clinton along with representatives from more than 60  organizations as part of the Better Buildings Challenge. The Challenge  is part of the Better Buildings Initiative launched in February by  President Obama, and is spearheaded by former President Clinton and the  President’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness to support job creation  by catalyzing private sector investment in commercial and industrial  building energy upgrades to make America’s buildings 20 percent more  efficient over the next decade, reducing energy costs for American  businesses by nearly $40 billion. Last year, commercial buildings  consumed roughly 20 percent of all the energy used by the U.S. economy.   “Upgrading the energy efficiency of America’s buildings is one of the  fastest, easiest, and cheapest ways to save money, cut down on harmful  pollution, and create good jobs right now.  But we can’t wait for  Congress to act.  So today, I’m directing all federal agencies to make  at least $2 billion worth of energy efficiency upgrades over the next 2  years – at no up-front cost to the taxpayer.  Coupled with today’s  extraordinary private sector commitments of $2 billion to upgrade  businesses, factories, and military housing, America is taking another  big step towards the competitive, clean energy economy it will take to  win the future,” said President Obama.  	“Investments in building retrofits and energy efficiency can make a  real difference in the American economy, by creating jobs, growing our  industries, improving businesses’ bottom lines, reducing our energy  bills and consumption, and preserving our planet for future generations.

We Can’t Wait: President Obama Announces Nearly $4 Billion Investment in Energy Upgrades to Public and Private Buildings | The White House

Upgrades Will Create Tens of Thousands of Jobs and Save Billions

President Obama today announced nearly $4 billion in combined federal and private sector energy upgrades to buildings over the next 2 years. These investments will save billions in energy costs, promote energy independence, and, according to independent estimates, create tens of thousands of jobs in the hard-hit construction sector. The $4 billion investment announced today includes a $2 billion commitment, made through the issuance of a Presidential Memorandum, to energy upgrades of federal buildings using long term energy savings to pay for up-front costs, at no cost to taxpayers. In addition, 60 CEOs, mayors, university presidents, and labor leaders today committed to invest nearly $2 billion of private capital into energy efficiency projects; and to upgrade energy performance by a minimum of 20% by 2020 in 1.6 billion square feet of office, industrial, municipal, hospital, university, community college and school buildings. This announcement builds on a commitment made by 14 partners at the Clinton Global Initiative America meeting in June to make energy upgrades across 300 million square feet, and to invest $500 million in private sector financing in energy efficiency projects.
 
Today’s commitments were announced by President Obama and former President Clinton along with representatives from more than 60 organizations as part of the Better Buildings Challenge. The Challenge is part of the Better Buildings Initiative launched in February by President Obama, and is spearheaded by former President Clinton and the President’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness to support job creation by catalyzing private sector investment in commercial and industrial building energy upgrades to make America’s buildings 20 percent more efficient over the next decade, reducing energy costs for American businesses by nearly $40 billion. Last year, commercial buildings consumed roughly 20 percent of all the energy used by the U.S. economy.
 
“Upgrading the energy efficiency of America’s buildings is one of the fastest, easiest, and cheapest ways to save money, cut down on harmful pollution, and create good jobs right now.  But we can’t wait for Congress to act.  So today, I’m directing all federal agencies to make at least $2 billion worth of energy efficiency upgrades over the next 2 years – at no up-front cost to the taxpayer.  Coupled with today’s extraordinary private sector commitments of $2 billion to upgrade businesses, factories, and military housing, America is taking another big step towards the competitive, clean energy economy it will take to win the future,” said President Obama. “Investments in building retrofits and energy efficiency can make a real difference in the American economy, by creating jobs, growing our industries, improving businesses’ bottom lines, reducing our energy bills and consumption, and preserving our planet for future generations.

IBM brings solar power to data centers | Green Tech - CNET News
A solar technician at IBM’s Bangalore, India research facility.
(Credit: IBM)
IBM is bringing electric power—in the form of solar panels—to data centers with trouble getting power in the first place.
The company tomorrow will detail a pilot project which couples solar  power with water-cooled servers that run on high-voltage direct-current.  The method results in about a ten percent energy savings by reducing  the losses that normally happen in converting from alternating power  from the grid to the direct current servers run on, according to Murali  Kota, the chief scientist of nanotechnology at IBM India who developed  the pilot as a side project.
That level of energy reduction is significant for large data centers  with many servers, but the implications of solar and servers are  potentially profound for places that don’t have access to reliable  power, Kota said.
A bank, for example, that wanted to set up a remote branch and operate a  data center could use solar power as a way to supplement power from the  grid and on-site generators. IBM plans to offer the system in custom  engagements next year. Clients in developing countries have already  shown an interest.
"Everybody is talking about getting connectivity from the grid. The  cities are already overloaded so they need ways to generate local  power," Kota said. "You can start connecting unconnected parts of the  world using this kind of system."

IBM brings solar power to data centers | Green Tech - CNET News

A solar technician at IBM’s Bangalore, India research facility.

(Credit: IBM)

IBM is bringing electric power—in the form of solar panels—to data centers with trouble getting power in the first place.

The company tomorrow will detail a pilot project which couples solar power with water-cooled servers that run on high-voltage direct-current. The method results in about a ten percent energy savings by reducing the losses that normally happen in converting from alternating power from the grid to the direct current servers run on, according to Murali Kota, the chief scientist of nanotechnology at IBM India who developed the pilot as a side project.

That level of energy reduction is significant for large data centers with many servers, but the implications of solar and servers are potentially profound for places that don’t have access to reliable power, Kota said.

A bank, for example, that wanted to set up a remote branch and operate a data center could use solar power as a way to supplement power from the grid and on-site generators. IBM plans to offer the system in custom engagements next year. Clients in developing countries have already shown an interest.

"Everybody is talking about getting connectivity from the grid. The cities are already overloaded so they need ways to generate local power," Kota said. "You can start connecting unconnected parts of the world using this kind of system."

CES: Green Plug plugs digital, efficient power supply | CNET

It’s time to digitize power supplies to make them smart enough to work with multiple devices and draw just the power electronics need, according to Green Plug.

Green Plug on Wednesday at the Consumer Electronics Show introduced its Green Power Process, which it said will be available in the second quarter this year.

A concept design of a universal power supply which would optimize power delivery to multiple electronic gadgets.

A concept design of a universal power supply which would optimize power delivery to multiple electronic gadgets.

(Credit: Green Plug)

The Green Power Processor is a chip designed for digital power supplies, which are meant to be more versatile and efficient than existing analog power adapters.

When built into a power supply, the processor can detect how much voltage and power a gadget, such as a PC or TV, needs from the grid. That allows electronics to use less energy overall than analog power suppliers and eliminate stand-by or vampire power.

Green Plug is marketing this processor to power supply manufacturers as a way to improve energy efficiency. Power adapters, or supplies, convert alternating current from the grid to the direct current that electronics use.



Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-11128_3-20027316-54.html#ixzz1AB1mDux0

People Power rides ‘Internet of things’ to smart grid | Green Tech - CNET News
The best path to energy-efficient electronics is connecting them to the Internet, according to People Power. The Silicon Valley-based company today launched a system that uses embedded networking chips and Internet software, called the Energy Services Platform, to monitor and control plugged-in devices for better efficiency. It says it’s working with some business partners and expects its products to be available in the first quarter of next year. 

People Power rides ‘Internet of things’ to smart grid | Green Tech - CNET News

The best path to energy-efficient electronics is connecting them to the Internet, according to People Power. The Silicon Valley-based company today launched a system that uses embedded networking chips and Internet software, called the Energy Services Platform, to monitor and control plugged-in devices for better efficiency. It says it’s working with some business partners and expects its products to be available in the first quarter of next year. 

Charts showing how much US residents pay for health care compared to people in other countries - Boing Boing
Four graphs created by the International Federation of Health Plans that compare how much US residents and people in other countries pay for health care. As Jay Livingston of the Montclair SocioBlog says, “Our Lipitor must be four to ten times a good as the Lipitor that Canadians take.”

Charts showing how much US residents pay for health care compared to people in other countries - Boing Boing

Four graphs created by the International Federation of Health Plans that compare how much US residents and people in other countries pay for health care. As Jay Livingston of the Montclair SocioBlog says, “Our Lipitor must be four to ten times a good as the Lipitor that Canadians take.”

Hannover Medical School, a leading university medical center in Germany, optimizes its treatment processes, reduces waiting times for patients and increases patient security through an automated tracking solution. The mobile and wireless technology can gather and record trauma patients’ data securely and in real time throughout their hospital stay, enabling its system to communicate: “Patient X is waiting for doctor Y in room Z.”

They have been used to model climate change, forecast economic trends, and simulate the intricate complexities folding proteins. Now IBM has something new in store for high-performance computers: heating buildings. Keeping cool: A novel on-chip water-cooling system developed by IBM could make it efficient for data centers to provide waste heat for buildings. Credit: IBM Zurich Research Laboratory Thanks to a novel on-chip water-cooling system developed by the company, the thermal energy from a cluster of computer processors can be efficiently recycled to provide hot water for an office, says Bruno Michel, manager of advanced thermal packaging at IBM’s Zurich Research Laboratory, in Switzerland. The goal, he says, is to improve the energy efficiency of large computing clusters and reduce their environmental impact. (via Technology Review: Computer Clusters That Heat Houses)

They have been used to model climate change, forecast economic trends, and simulate the intricate complexities folding proteins. Now IBM has something new in store for high-performance computers: heating buildings. Keeping cool: A novel on-chip water-cooling system developed by IBM could make it efficient for data centers to provide waste heat for buildings. Credit: IBM Zurich Research Laboratory Thanks to a novel on-chip water-cooling system developed by the company, the thermal energy from a cluster of computer processors can be efficiently recycled to provide hot water for an office, says Bruno Michel, manager of advanced thermal packaging at IBM’s Zurich Research Laboratory, in Switzerland. The goal, he says, is to improve the energy efficiency of large computing clusters and reduce their environmental impact. (via Technology Review: Computer Clusters That Heat Houses)

IBM recently announced new offerings to help clients address the costs, risks and efficiency challenges associated with using and storing paper. As part of the new offerings, IBM is expanding on its efforts to help clients reduce their use of paper – IBM experts and consultants will provide hands–on assessments to clients to evaluate how they can reduce their paper usage costs, helping clients understand the potential savings and benefits of eliminating the paper burden within their organization. As part of today’s news IBM also announced that State of North Dakota , Land Information New Zealand, Renewtek, and VR Kreditwerk have chosen IBM technology to help them in their efforts to lower paper consumption costs and improve business efficiency. (via BeyeNETWORK: IBM Announces New Offerings to Help Clients Address the Challenges Associated with Using and Storing Paper)

IBM recently announced new offerings to help clients address the costs, risks and efficiency challenges associated with using and storing paper. As part of the new offerings, IBM is expanding on its efforts to help clients reduce their use of paper – IBM experts and consultants will provide hands–on assessments to clients to evaluate how they can reduce their paper usage costs, helping clients understand the potential savings and benefits of eliminating the paper burden within their organization. As part of today’s news IBM also announced that State of North Dakota , Land Information New Zealand, Renewtek, and VR Kreditwerk have chosen IBM technology to help them in their efforts to lower paper consumption costs and improve business efficiency. (via BeyeNETWORK: IBM Announces New Offerings to Help Clients Address the Challenges Associated with Using and Storing Paper)

You probably work smarter today than you did a few years ago—or even last year. Technology has the potential to significantly increase business productivity as well as reduce costs. The rise in globalization has opened access to new talent, expertise and resources that have energized businesses… in fact, two thirds of workers are now located in growth markets (via IBM Smarter Work - Business productivity)

You probably work smarter today than you did a few years ago—or even last year. Technology has the potential to significantly increase business productivity as well as reduce costs. The rise in globalization has opened access to new talent, expertise and resources that have energized businesses… in fact, two thirds of workers are now located in growth markets (via IBM Smarter Work - Business productivity)