Dear Nate Silver:
My name is Emma Gertlowitz and I’m eleven years old and for a million years I liked Justin Bieber because he was so cute but now I like you. I watched you on MSNBC and HBO and on “Charlie Rose” and I can’t stop thinking about how you study polls and create probability models and predict elections and how you’re always right, which I think is so unbelievably cute, and I keep imagining you saying to me, “Emma, I think that there’s a 93.7% chance of me falling in love with you…”

Read “A Date with Nate,” one girl’s love letter to Nate Silver, by Paul Rudnick

(via newyorker)

(via newyorker)

Votizen Brings The Empowerment Of The Internet To Elections | Fast Company
Before political campaigns were all over blogs, Meetup.com, YouTube,  Twitter, and Facebook, there was USA.gov, cofounded by David Binetti in  2000. The site, which was the platform for the first ever webcast from  the Oval Office, is now the U.S. Government’s official portal.
Binetti’s new venture is a Silicon Valley tech startup called Votizen,  a social network where voters can campaign for a candidate or a cause.  Users reach out primarily to friends or acquaintances, leveraging their  own social networks to organize. Votizen was used heavily in last  November’s San Francisco mayoral race, which resulted in the election of  Ed Lee, the first Chinese-American mayor in that city’s history. With  the 2012 campaign heating up, we spoke with David Binetti, Votizen’s CEO  and cofounder, about the disruptive impact of technology on the  political landscape and the challenges of innovating in the federal  government.

Votizen Brings The Empowerment Of The Internet To Elections | Fast Company

Before political campaigns were all over blogs, Meetup.com, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook, there was USA.gov, cofounded by David Binetti in 2000. The site, which was the platform for the first ever webcast from the Oval Office, is now the U.S. Government’s official portal.

Binetti’s new venture is a Silicon Valley tech startup called Votizen, a social network where voters can campaign for a candidate or a cause. Users reach out primarily to friends or acquaintances, leveraging their own social networks to organize. Votizen was used heavily in last November’s San Francisco mayoral race, which resulted in the election of Ed Lee, the first Chinese-American mayor in that city’s history. With the 2012 campaign heating up, we spoke with David Binetti, Votizen’s CEO and cofounder, about the disruptive impact of technology on the political landscape and the challenges of innovating in the federal government.