The Digitalization of Healthcare: A Status Report for American Health Information Technology

Speaker/Performer: Michael Minear, CIO, UC Davis Health System

Sponsor: CITRIS (Ctr for Info Technology Research in the Interest of Society)

Michael Minear, Chief Information Officer at the UC Davis Medical Center, is a national leader in health-care information technology. He has an extensive record of leading transformations of large, complex organizations in the use of modern information technology.

Electronic Medical Records Finally Become a Reality, Thanks to the iPad
Digital health is a hot market right now, with funding levels having tripled over the past year. Y Combinator graduate drchrono is one of many scrappy young startups aiming to change the stodgy old healthcare system. Indeed, drchrono strikes at one of the core problems of traditional healthcare: paperwork. Drchrono is an EMR (Electronic Medical Record) solution for doctors, optimized for the iPad and also available on iPhone and the Web.
Drchrono has a wide range of features; including scheduling an appointment, inputting medical details, eprescribing, billing, and Medical Speech to Text technology. Perhaps the best feature is that the patient can get a copy of their medical records, via the app.

Electronic Medical Records Finally Become a Reality, Thanks to the iPad

Digital health is a hot market right now, with funding levels having tripled over the past year. Y Combinator graduate drchrono is one of many scrappy young startups aiming to change the stodgy old healthcare system. Indeed, drchrono strikes at one of the core problems of traditional healthcare: paperwork. Drchrono is an EMR (Electronic Medical Record) solution for doctors, optimized for the iPad and also available on iPhone and the Web.

Drchrono has a wide range of features; including scheduling an appointment, inputting medical details, eprescribing, billing, and Medical Speech to Text technology. Perhaps the best feature is that the patient can get a copy of their medical records, via the app.

Mobile Health: AgaMatrix iPhone glucose monitor | MedTech
This is an awesome device that turns the iPhone into your own personal  blood glucose meter. Well…that’s boring right? My glucose meter does  that right now. Not quite. With iPhone being directly linked to current  wireless technology the app for iBGStar automatically logs data and  sends it to the office of your health care professional so that data is  available for review is a precise format. This way your healthcare  professional can analyse the data as it comes in and make decisions to  optimize the patient’s dosage and other medical management without the  patient coming to the office.

Mobile Health: AgaMatrix iPhone glucose monitor | MedTech

This is an awesome device that turns the iPhone into your own personal blood glucose meter. Well…that’s boring right? My glucose meter does that right now. Not quite. With iPhone being directly linked to current wireless technology the app for iBGStar automatically logs data and sends it to the office of your health care professional so that data is available for review is a precise format. This way your healthcare professional can analyse the data as it comes in and make decisions to optimize the patient’s dosage and other medical management without the patient coming to the office.

Patient Data-Sharing Is Started By Big Medical Groups 
The ideal of computerizing patient records is captured in the words behind the government’s aspirational acronym, N.H.I.N., for Nationwide Health Information Network.
The vision includes not only the efficient collection and use of  digitized patient records to help physicians make smarter, more  cost-effective diagnoses, but also the sharing of information by  far-flung doctors and hospitals. A person walks into a clinic in  Phoenix, say, and, with permission, her records from her hometown  physician’s office in San Francisco are efficiently summoned with a  mouse-click.
Across much of the country, that ambitious vision lies well in the  future. After all, only about one quarter of the nation’s doctors even  use computerized patient records today. The Obama administration is  offering billions of dollars in incentives over the next five years — up  to $44,000 per physician — to accelerate the adoption of electronic  health records.
But five leading medical groups — pioneers in the use of electronic  health records — are announcing on Wednesday a project intended to  exchange patient information. It is intended as an elite forerunner of  the national health information network, spanning several states and  millions of patients.
The five are Geisinger Health System, Kaiser Permanente, Mayo Clinic, Intermountain Healthcare and Group Health Cooperative. They are calling their project the Care Connectivity Consortium.
Source: NY Times

Patient Data-Sharing Is Started By Big Medical Groups

The ideal of computerizing patient records is captured in the words behind the government’s aspirational acronym, N.H.I.N., for Nationwide Health Information Network.

The vision includes not only the efficient collection and use of digitized patient records to help physicians make smarter, more cost-effective diagnoses, but also the sharing of information by far-flung doctors and hospitals. A person walks into a clinic in Phoenix, say, and, with permission, her records from her hometown physician’s office in San Francisco are efficiently summoned with a mouse-click.

Across much of the country, that ambitious vision lies well in the future. After all, only about one quarter of the nation’s doctors even use computerized patient records today. The Obama administration is offering billions of dollars in incentives over the next five years — up to $44,000 per physician — to accelerate the adoption of electronic health records.

But five leading medical groups — pioneers in the use of electronic health records — are announcing on Wednesday a project intended to exchange patient information. It is intended as an elite forerunner of the national health information network, spanning several states and millions of patients.

The five are Geisinger Health System, Kaiser Permanente, Mayo Clinic, Intermountain Healthcare and Group Health Cooperative. They are calling their project the Care Connectivity Consortium.

Source: NY Times

IBM, Aetna roll out cloud-based clinical decision support system | Businessweek

IBM and health-insurance giant Aetna Inc. Thursday introduced a cloud-computing offering that analyzes patient data stored in electronic medical records (EMRs) and administrative data systems and sends updates on treatment progress, drug interactions and best practices to physicians.

IBM teamed with Aetna subsidary ActiveHealth Management to create the hosted Collaborative Care Solution product that provides clinical support for physicians, and allows patients to access their own data, without requiring an investment in new infrastructure. The Collabroative Care Solution supports so-called “evidence-based medicine,” expected to become a government requirement in the second-phase of "meaningful use" rules for EMRs.

Health 2.0 has pushed innovation in health care from its inception. From social networks for patients and providers to vertical search and mobile health tools, innovation continues. The Quantified Self represents the latest level of innovation for healthcare. The letters to the NY Times Sunday Magazine in response to the feature on The Data Driven Live, has this choice quote by Patricia Flatley Brennet of Project HealthDesign “Doctors are experts in clinical care; patients are experts in their daily experiences and how they make them feel. Both need to share more with each other.”

But some healthcare organizations have been innovative from the beginning. See the video on the Cleveland Clinic Model of Medicine and then read their latest Annual Report with President Obama on the cover. What a great place to work.

eHealth » John W. Sharp on eHealth and Health IT » A History of Innovation in Medicine