Belgian Hackers Let You Build Circuit Boards on the Web | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com
The rise of low-cost, hacker-friendly electronics is fueling a new wave of hardware hobbyists. Using programmable boards like the Arduino and dirt-chip computers like the Raspberry Pi, you can build everything from your very own supercomputers to an internet-connected beer fermentation refrigeration system.
But Belgium startup called Circuits.io wants to take this trend even further. It wants to give you the power to build your own custom circuit boards.
Historically, that’s been expensive and difficult for hobbyists to do, but Circuits.io wants to change that by offering a web-based circuit board design system made especially for hobbyists complete with library of open source component designs. And soon it will also offer a CafePress-style print-on-demand service for circuit boards.

  Belgian Hackers Let You Build Circuit Boards on the Web | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

The rise of low-cost, hacker-friendly electronics is fueling a new wave of hardware hobbyists. Using programmable boards like the Arduino and dirt-chip computers like the Raspberry Pi, you can build everything from your very own supercomputers to an internet-connected beer fermentation refrigeration system.

But Belgium startup called Circuits.io wants to take this trend even further. It wants to give you the power to build your own custom circuit boards.

Historically, that’s been expensive and difficult for hobbyists to do, but Circuits.io wants to change that by offering a web-based circuit board design system made especially for hobbyists complete with library of open source component designs. And soon it will also offer a CafePress-style print-on-demand service for circuit boards.

New wonder material replaces graphene for future electronic devices | KurzweilAI
Entirely new kinds of devices —- entire walls of light, smart windows, eyeglass displays, complex electronic circuits —- from new 2D molybdenum disulfide: MIT researchers
MIT researchers — who struggled for several years to build electronic circuits out of graphene with very limited results (except for radio-frequency applications) — have now succeeded in making a variety of electronic components from an amazing new material: a 2D version of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2).
The MIT researchers say the material could help usher in radically new products, from whole walls that glow to clothing with embedded electronics to glasses with built-in display screens.

New wonder material replaces graphene for future electronic devices | KurzweilAI

Entirely new kinds of devices —- entire walls of light, smart windows, eyeglass displays, complex electronic circuits —- from new 2D molybdenum disulfide: MIT researchers

MIT researchers — who struggled for several years to build electronic circuits out of graphene with very limited results (except for radio-frequency applications) — have now succeeded in making a variety of electronic components from an amazing new material: a 2D version of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2).

The MIT researchers say the material could help usher in radically new products, from whole walls that glow to clothing with embedded electronics to glasses with built-in display screens.

Tomorrow’s Transistor, Built Atom by Atom - Technology Review
 
Applied Materials,  the world’s leading supplier of manufacturing equipment to chipmakers,  has announced a new system for making one of the most critical layers of  the transistors found in logic circuits.
Applied Materials’ new tool, announced at the Semicon West  conference in San Francisco on Tuesday, deposits a critical layer in  transistors one atom at a time, providing unprecedented precision.
As chipmakers scale transistors down to ever-smaller sizes, enabling  speedier and more power-efficient electronics, atomic-scale  manufacturing precision is a growing concern. The first chips with  transistors just 22 nanometers in size are going into production this  year, and at that size, even the tiniest inconsistencies can mean that a  chip intended to sell at a premium must instead be used for low-end  gadgetry.

Tomorrow’s Transistor, Built Atom by Atom - Technology Review

Applied Materials, the world’s leading supplier of manufacturing equipment to chipmakers, has announced a new system for making one of the most critical layers of the transistors found in logic circuits.

Applied Materials’ new tool, announced at the Semicon West conference in San Francisco on Tuesday, deposits a critical layer in transistors one atom at a time, providing unprecedented precision.

As chipmakers scale transistors down to ever-smaller sizes, enabling speedier and more power-efficient electronics, atomic-scale manufacturing precision is a growing concern. The first chips with transistors just 22 nanometers in size are going into production this year, and at that size, even the tiniest inconsistencies can mean that a chip intended to sell at a premium must instead be used for low-end gadgetry.

CES: Green Plug plugs digital, efficient power supply | CNET

It’s time to digitize power supplies to make them smart enough to work with multiple devices and draw just the power electronics need, according to Green Plug.

Green Plug on Wednesday at the Consumer Electronics Show introduced its Green Power Process, which it said will be available in the second quarter this year.

A concept design of a universal power supply which would optimize power delivery to multiple electronic gadgets.

A concept design of a universal power supply which would optimize power delivery to multiple electronic gadgets.

(Credit: Green Plug)

The Green Power Processor is a chip designed for digital power supplies, which are meant to be more versatile and efficient than existing analog power adapters.

When built into a power supply, the processor can detect how much voltage and power a gadget, such as a PC or TV, needs from the grid. That allows electronics to use less energy overall than analog power suppliers and eliminate stand-by or vampire power.

Green Plug is marketing this processor to power supply manufacturers as a way to improve energy efficiency. Power adapters, or supplies, convert alternating current from the grid to the direct current that electronics use.



Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-11128_3-20027316-54.html#ixzz1AB1mDux0

People Power rides ‘Internet of things’ to smart grid | Green Tech - CNET News
The best path to energy-efficient electronics is connecting them to the Internet, according to People Power. The Silicon Valley-based company today launched a system that uses embedded networking chips and Internet software, called the Energy Services Platform, to monitor and control plugged-in devices for better efficiency. It says it’s working with some business partners and expects its products to be available in the first quarter of next year. 

People Power rides ‘Internet of things’ to smart grid | Green Tech - CNET News

The best path to energy-efficient electronics is connecting them to the Internet, according to People Power. The Silicon Valley-based company today launched a system that uses embedded networking chips and Internet software, called the Energy Services Platform, to monitor and control plugged-in devices for better efficiency. It says it’s working with some business partners and expects its products to be available in the first quarter of next year. 

Most of the devices on display this year [at the Consumer Electronics Show] are not electronic islands. Nearly everything is a little computer that wants to seek out and connect to other computerized devices, no matter who makes them. Then they will send your music, photos and video around your home, and get even more from the Internet.

NYTimes on CES: This Year, It’s All About Interconnected Devices

(Posted via Blackberry 8830 on NJ Transit commuter train)