Sylvia Earle’s TED Prize wish to protect our oceans | Video on TED.com

Legendary ocean researcher Sylvia Earle shares astonishing images of the ocean — and shocking stats about its rapid decline — as she makes her TED Prize wish: that we will join her in protecting the vital blue heart of the planet.

11th Hour

The 11th Hour is a 2007 feature film documentary, created, produced and narrated by Leonardo DiCaprio, on the state of the natural environment. It was directed by Leila Conners Petersen and Nadia Conners and financed by Adam Lewis and Pierre André Senizergues, and distributed by Warner Independent Pictures. Its world premiere was at the 2007 60th Annual Cannes Film Festival (May 16–27, 2007) and it was released on August 17, 2007, in the year in which the Fourth Assessment Report of the United Nations global warming panel IPCC was published and about a year after Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth, another film documentary about global warming.

3 Ways Internet Of Things Works On Your Phone | ReadWriteWeb
When we write about Internet of Things we explain the latest in futuristic “sense and share” devices for your clothes, homes and cars. Yet when it comes to modern mobile, we don’t need to focus so much on what can be done in the future as much as what can be done right now. Our phones’ ability to “sense and share” is well established. Explaining what your phone can currently do is an ideal way to explain what everyday objects will be able to do once they become Internet of Things objects.
At a recent Google summit on wireless sensors, Deborah Estin, director of the Center for Embedded Network Sensing at UCLA spoke of three simple ways our phones already work the way the future Internet of Things will work. Estin’s presentation, Participatory Sensing: An Emerging Driver For The Multidimensional Internet, explains what we’ll one day be able to do for not only our own health but for the health of the world we live in.  

3 Ways Internet Of Things Works On Your Phone | ReadWriteWeb

When we write about Internet of Things we explain the latest in futuristic “sense and share” devices for your clothes, homes and cars. Yet when it comes to modern mobile, we don’t need to focus so much on what can be done in the future as much as what can be done right now. Our phones’ ability to “sense and share” is well established. Explaining what your phone can currently do is an ideal way to explain what everyday objects will be able to do once they become Internet of Things objects.

At a recent Google summit on wireless sensors, Deborah Estin, director of the Center for Embedded Network Sensing at UCLA spoke of three simple ways our phones already work the way the future Internet of Things will work. Estin’s presentation, Participatory Sensing: An Emerging Driver For The Multidimensional Internet, explains what we’ll one day be able to do for not only our own health but for the health of the world we live in.  

Feds plan  landslide sensors in San Rafael’s Lucas Valley - ContraCostaTimes.com
In the new system, the rain gauge will be combined with high-tech soil moisture and pore water pressure sensors, each of which will monitor conditions that could lead to destabilization of the hillsides. The first sensor checks the moisture levels in the soil, while the second is a gauge on how much pressure is being caused by that soil moisture.

Feds plan landslide sensors in San Rafael’s Lucas Valley - ContraCostaTimes.com

In the new system, the rain gauge will be combined with high-tech soil moisture and pore water pressure sensors, each of which will monitor conditions that could lead to destabilization of the hillsides. The first sensor checks the moisture levels in the soil, while the second is a gauge on how much pressure is being caused by that soil moisture.

Our ancestors viewed the Earth as rich and bountiful, which it is. Many people in the past also saw nature as inexhaustibly sustainable, which we now know is the case only if we care for it. It is not difficult to forgive destruction in the past which resulted from ignorance. Today, however, we have access to more information, and it is essential that we re-examine ethically what we have inherited, what we are responsible for, and what we will pass on to coming generations. Our marvels of science and technology are matched if not outweighed by many current tragedies, including human starvation in some parts of the world, and the extinction of other life-forms. The exploration of space takes place at the same time as the Earth’s own oceans, seas, and fresh water areas grow increasingly polluted. Many of the Earth’s habitats, animals, plants, insects, and even micro-organisms that we know as rare may not be known at all by future generations. We have the capability, and the responsibility. We must act before it is too late.

The Dalai Lama, His Holiness Tenzin Gyatso, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama of Tibet, spiritual leader of the Buddhist faith (via shitas)
emergentfutures:

NEON Distributed Sensor Networks
An artist’s conception of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) depicting its distributed sensor networks, experiments and aerial and satellite remote sensing capabilities, all linked via cyberinfrastructure into a single “scalable” integrated research platform for conducting continental-scale ecological research. NEON is one of several National Science Foundation (NSF) Earth-observing systems.

emergentfutures:

NEON Distributed Sensor Networks

An artist’s conception of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) depicting its distributed sensor networks, experiments and aerial and satellite remote sensing capabilities, all linked via cyberinfrastructure into a single “scalable” integrated research platform for conducting continental-scale ecological research. NEON is one of several National Science Foundation (NSF) Earth-observing systems.

smartercities:

CitiSense: Cellular Environmental Monitoring  » dailywireless.org   » 
CitiSense, a cell-phone based sensor network system, has won a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation to develop and deploy hundreds of small environmental sensors carried by the public in San Diego. The goal of CitiSense is to build and deploy thousands of small environmental sensors that use cell phones to relay data. The sensor-wearing public may also wear biological monitors, collecting basic health information, such as heart rate. The data will be analyzed, anonymized and reflected back out to individuals, public health agencies and San Diego at large.

smartercities:

CitiSense: Cellular Environmental Monitoring  » dailywireless.org  »

CitiSense, a cell-phone based sensor network system, has won a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation to develop and deploy hundreds of small environmental sensors carried by the public in San Diego. The goal of CitiSense is to build and deploy thousands of small environmental sensors that use cell phones to relay data. The sensor-wearing public may also wear biological monitors, collecting basic health information, such as heart rate. The data will be analyzed, anonymized and reflected back out to individuals, public health agencies and San Diego at large.

Participatory Sensing - An Interview with Deborah Estrin - O’Reilly Radar

The iPhone is a rich portable computer with onboard sensors. Specifically, it is a location-aware (GPS), motion-aware (accelerometer), directionally-aware (digital compass) visually aware (camera being used to scan QA codes or serve as visual input), sonically aware (microphone and speakers), always-connected (wireless or 3Gs) handheld computer. Every operative word in that sentence is deeply meaningful and rich with possibilities we have just begun to explore. The iPhone does a whole lot more than display information. It is an environmental sensor. Its value lies just as much in sensing information as it does in displaying information.