smartercities:

ElectriCity — Ultramodern Electric Bus Service Launching In Gothenburg In 2015 | Clean Technica
Buses that are silent, energy efficient, and don’t release exhaust — sounds good, doesn’t it? Just such a bus service is now in development in the Swedish city of Gothenburg — it’s currently set to launch in 2015. The new “ultramodern” bus service will be entirely electric and powered entirely by renewable energy sources.

smartercities:

ElectriCity — Ultramodern Electric Bus Service Launching In Gothenburg In 2015 | Clean Technica

Buses that are silent, energy efficient, and don’t release exhaust — sounds good, doesn’t it? Just such a bus service is now in development in the Swedish city of Gothenburg — it’s currently set to launch in 2015. The new “ultramodern” bus service will be entirely electric and powered entirely by renewable energy sources.

Graphene Ultracapacitors Offer Blistering Performance and Charge in a Couple of Minutes
Researchers at the University of California are developing graphene supercapacitors that can charge and discharge in a couple of minutes. The ability to discharge in a couple of minutes means that they are extremely powerful. More importantly though, these researchers developed a technique for printing graphene supercapacitors using a DVD burner.
The researchers dissolved graphite oxide in water and heated it with a laser from a standard DVD burner to obtain flexible graphene sheets. These graphene sheets are one-atom thick, yet can hold a remarkable amount of energy, while being charged or discharged in very little time compared to standard batteries.
Ultracapacitors have tremendous advantages over typical lithium-ion batteries, some of which are of paramount importance to the adoption of electric cars, such as their ability to charge in as little as 1 second, and last 20 years (easily, and with very heavy usage).

Graphene Ultracapacitors Offer Blistering Performance and Charge in a Couple of Minutes

Researchers at the University of California are developing graphene supercapacitors that can charge and discharge in a couple of minutes. The ability to discharge in a couple of minutes means that they are extremely powerful. More importantly though, these researchers developed a technique for printing graphene supercapacitors using a DVD burner.

The researchers dissolved graphite oxide in water and heated it with a laser from a standard DVD burner to obtain flexible graphene sheets. These graphene sheets are one-atom thick, yet can hold a remarkable amount of energy, while being charged or discharged in very little time compared to standard batteries.

Ultracapacitors have tremendous advantages over typical lithium-ion batteries, some of which are of paramount importance to the adoption of electric cars, such as their ability to charge in as little as 1 second, and last 20 years (easily, and with very heavy usage).

World’s First Electric Car Ferry Recharges in 10 Minutes | Wired.com
The world’s first battery electric car ferry is under development in Norway. It’s capable of carrying 120 cars and 360 passengers, and it can fully recharge in just 10 minutes.

Called ZeroCat, the 260-foot ferry will enter passenger service in 2015 on a route between Lavik and Oppedal. The ferry’s electric powertrain was designed by Norwegian shipyard Fjellstrand with battery technology from Siemens, and it will be run by ferry operator Norled.

Instead of a 2,000-hp diesel engine — which powers the current ferry and sucks up over 264,000 gallons of fuel each year — ZeroCat features an 800 kW battery that weighs 11 tons and drives two screws. Though the battery is quite heavy, the ship only weighs half as much as a conventional catamaran ferry, thanks to twin hulls made of aluminum. Those hulls are a slim design, which further increases efficiency, with Siemens estimating the ferry will need only 400 kW to cruise at 10 knots.

World’s First Electric Car Ferry Recharges in 10 Minutes | Wired.com

The world’s first battery electric car ferry is under development in Norway. It’s capable of carrying 120 cars and 360 passengers, and it can fully recharge in just 10 minutes.

Called ZeroCat, the 260-foot ferry will enter passenger service in 2015 on a route between Lavik and Oppedal. The ferry’s electric powertrain was designed by Norwegian shipyard Fjellstrand with battery technology from Siemens, and it will be run by ferry operator Norled.

Instead of a 2,000-hp diesel engine — which powers the current ferry and sucks up over 264,000 gallons of fuel each year — ZeroCat features an 800 kW battery that weighs 11 tons and drives two screws. Though the battery is quite heavy, the ship only weighs half as much as a conventional catamaran ferry, thanks to twin hulls made of aluminum. Those hulls are a slim design, which further increases efficiency, with Siemens estimating the ferry will need only 400 kW to cruise at 10 knots.

Crowdfunding push for EZ-EV open source electric kit car
Electrical engineer Gary Krysztopik has been driving his self-built, open-framed, three-wheeled electric “hotrod” on the roads and highways of San Antonio (TX) for over three years now, but folks still can’t help staring as he zooms past. While also working on gas-to-electric conversions (including a VW Bug and a Porsche Carrera), he’s been busy refining and tweaking the design for his “battery box on wheels” and is now preparing to release the EZ-EV car as open source plans, build-it-yourself kits and complete vehicles.

Crowdfunding push for EZ-EV open source electric kit car

Electrical engineer Gary Krysztopik has been driving his self-built, open-framed, three-wheeled electric “hotrod” on the roads and highways of San Antonio (TX) for over three years now, but folks still can’t help staring as he zooms past. While also working on gas-to-electric conversions (including a VW Bug and a Porsche Carrera), he’s been busy refining and tweaking the design for his “battery box on wheels” and is now preparing to release the EZ-EV car as open source plans, build-it-yourself kits and complete vehicles.

Self-Charging Lithium Ion Battery – Thank You Georgia Tech - Gas 2
Georgia Tech has made a self-charging lithium ion battery. This could be a major breakthrough for the electric vehicle (EV) industry, if it can be economized and applied to the auto industry.
Researchers at Georgia Tech started with a simple, coin sized, lithium ion battery and replaced the dividers between the electrodes with a polyvinylidene difluoride film. The films piezoelectric nature makes a charging action inside that gap through just a little pressure with no outside voltage required. Basically, you push on the battery and it charges itself.
The developers tested the battery by placing it in the sole of a shoe; just walking kept the battery charged.
Think about integrating this self-charging lithium ion battery technology into an EV. This takes the idea of regenerative braking to a whole new level. There would be no need to worry about finding a charging station. Hybrids and other fossil fuel vehicles would be a thing of the past. You could continually drive without having to stop to fuel up. The fuels costs for shipping would no longer exist. The list goes on.
Gas 2.0 (http://s.tt/1oOLZ)

Self-Charging Lithium Ion Battery – Thank You Georgia Tech - Gas 2

Georgia Tech has made a self-charging lithium ion battery. This could be a major breakthrough for the electric vehicle (EV) industry, if it can be economized and applied to the auto industry.

Researchers at Georgia Tech started with a simple, coin sized, lithium ion battery and replaced the dividers between the electrodes with a polyvinylidene difluoride film. The films piezoelectric nature makes a charging action inside that gap through just a little pressure with no outside voltage required. Basically, you push on the battery and it charges itself.

The developers tested the battery by placing it in the sole of a shoe; just walking kept the battery charged.

Think about integrating this self-charging lithium ion battery technology into an EV. This takes the idea of regenerative braking to a whole new level. There would be no need to worry about finding a charging stationHybrids and other fossil fuel vehicles would be a thing of the past. You could continually drive without having to stop to fuel up. The fuels costs for shipping would no longer exist. The list goes on.


Gas 2.0 (http://s.tt/1oOLZ)

Plug-In Kit Turns Any Car Into A Hybrid For $3000 - PSFK
Students from the Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) have developed a plug-in hybrid retrofit kit. The eco-friendly kit is said to work with almost any car to turn it into a hybrid vehicle. The best part is, the cost of the technology would cost around $3,000 if it’s commercialized.
Professor Charles Perry from MTSU recently fitted the hub technology on a 1995 Honda station wagon, and helped the vehicle increase its gas mileage by 50 to 100 percent. Perry commented that, “The whole point was to demonstrate the feasibility of adding the electrical motor to the rear wheel of the car without changing the brakes, bearings, suspension — anything mechanical.”
Watch the video below to see how the Plug-In Hybrid Retrofit Kit is fitted and how it works:

via PSFK: http://www.psfk.com/2012/08/diy-hybrid-car-kit.html#ixzz22Ug50Hu8

Plug-In Kit Turns Any Car Into A Hybrid For $3000 - PSFK

Students from the Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) have developed a plug-in hybrid retrofit kit. The eco-friendly kit is said to work with almost any car to turn it into a hybrid vehicle. The best part is, the cost of the technology would cost around $3,000 if it’s commercialized.

Professor Charles Perry from MTSU recently fitted the hub technology on a 1995 Honda station wagon, and helped the vehicle increase its gas mileage by 50 to 100 percent. Perry commented that, “The whole point was to demonstrate the feasibility of adding the electrical motor to the rear wheel of the car without changing the brakes, bearings, suspension — anything mechanical.”

Watch the video below to see how the Plug-In Hybrid Retrofit Kit is fitted and how it works:



via PSFK: http://www.psfk.com/2012/08/diy-hybrid-car-kit.html#ixzz22Ug50Hu8

Hertz and IBM Launch Smart Microgrid for Electric Car-Sharing | TPM Idea Lab
IBM’s Ehningen Innovation Center campus in Germany is about to become ground zero for the development of an advanced personal transportation system that combines Hertz’s car sharing know-how with distributed renewable energy, electric vehicles and smart microgrid technology.
The new system, announced earlier this week, will piggyback on an existing car sharing agreement between the Ehningen campus and nearby Stuttgart Airport, through Hertz’s online self-service renting portal.
The new field test illustrates IBM’s accelerating embrace of renewable energy and electric vehicle technology. Last month, Idea Lab reported that IBM has been developing an advanced lithium-air battery that could be instrumental in lowering the retail price of electric vehicles.
The Ehningen test dovetails with IBM’s EV battery research and with its participation in the EDISON research consortium, which the company joined in 2009. EDISON is a Denmark-based project (it stands for Electric Vehicles in a Distributed and Integrated Market using Sustainable Energy and Open Networks) designed to build a pathway to mass market use of electric vehicles.

Hertz and IBM Launch Smart Microgrid for Electric Car-Sharing | TPM Idea Lab

IBM’s Ehningen Innovation Center campus in Germany is about to become ground zero for the development of an advanced personal transportation system that combines Hertz’s car sharing know-how with distributed renewable energy, electric vehicles and smart microgrid technology.

The new system, announced earlier this week, will piggyback on an existing car sharing agreement between the Ehningen campus and nearby Stuttgart Airport, through Hertz’s online self-service renting portal.

The new field test illustrates IBM’s accelerating embrace of renewable energy and electric vehicle technology. Last month, Idea Lab reported that IBM has been developing an advanced lithium-air battery that could be instrumental in lowering the retail price of electric vehicles.

The Ehningen test dovetails with IBM’s EV battery research and with its participation in the EDISON research consortium, which the company joined in 2009. EDISON is a Denmark-based project (it stands for Electric Vehicles in a Distributed and Integrated Market using Sustainable Energy and Open Networks) designed to build a pathway to mass market use of electric vehicles.

Second Wind: Air-Breathing Lithium Batteries Promise Recharge-Free Long-Range Driving—If the Bugs Can Be Worked Out: Scientific American
IBM-led research to create lithium-air electric vehicle batteries gets a boost from Japanese chemical companies toward the goal of 800 kilometers out of a full charge
Researchers predict a new type of lithium battery under development could give an electric car enough juice to travel a whopping 800 kilometers before it needs to be plugged in again—about 10 times the energy that today’s lithium ion batteries supply. It is a tantalizing prospect—a lighter, longer-lasting, air-breathing power source for the next generation of vehicles—if only someone could build a working model. Several roadblocks stand between these lithium–air batteries and the open road, however, primarily in finding electrodes and electrolytes that are stable enough for rechargeable battery chemistry.IBM plans to take lithium–air batteries out of neutral by building a working prototype by the end of next year. The company announced Friday it has stepped up development efforts by adding two Japanese technology firms—chemical manufacturer Asahi Kasei Corp. and electrolyte maker Central Glass—to the IBM Battery 500 Project, a coalition IBM established in 2009 to accelerate the switch from gas to electric-powered vehicles among carmakers and their customers.

Second Wind: Air-Breathing Lithium Batteries Promise Recharge-Free Long-Range Driving—If the Bugs Can Be Worked Out: Scientific American

IBM-led research to create lithium-air electric vehicle batteries gets a boost from Japanese chemical companies toward the goal of 800 kilometers out of a full charge

Researchers predict a new type of lithium battery under development could give an electric car enough juice to travel a whopping 800 kilometers before it needs to be plugged in again—about 10 times the energy that today’s lithium ion batteries supply. It is a tantalizing prospect—a lighter, longer-lasting, air-breathing power source for the next generation of vehicles—if only someone could build a working model. Several roadblocks stand between these lithium–air batteries and the open road, however, primarily in finding electrodes and electrolytes that are stable enough for rechargeable battery chemistry.

IBM plans to take lithium–air batteries out of neutral by building a working prototype by the end of next year. The company announced Friday it has stepped up development efforts by adding two Japanese technology firms—chemical manufacturer Asahi Kasei Corp. and electrolyte maker Central Glass—to the IBM Battery 500 Project, a coalition IBM established in 2009 to accelerate the switch from gas to electric-powered vehicles among carmakers and their customers.

EV Week: Electric Vehicle Charging: A Pilot to Turn “Challenge” into “Opportunity” « A Smarter Planet Blog
By Jonathan Marshall, Chief, External CommunicationsPacific Gas and Electric Company
Electric vehicle (EV) owners and electric utilities may soon enjoy a much closer and more fulfilling relationship than traditional car owners have with gas stations, thanks to a new pilot project announced today by IBM, Honda Motors, and Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). This collaboration aims to demonstrate the ability to optimize the charge schedule for each customer’s EV battery so that the needs of customers and the electric grid are satisfied on an ongoing basis. That’s still a stretch for most utilities.
When the typical power engineer hears “electric vehicle,” he or she usually thinks: “challenge.” A plug-in vehicle can draw as much power as three homes in the more temperate parts of California. An enthusiastic bunch of early adopters could potentially overload local circuits if they all charge up at the same time in the same neighborhood.
But PG&E is thinking instead, “opportunity.” For one thing, we have a growing number of clean electric vehicles in our own fleet, from Chevy Volts to a new class of extended-range pickup trucks from Via Motors. And we know that widespread adoption of EVs throughout California will help the state meet its ambitious clean-air goals.
For another, we believe there’s great potential for using the latest “smart grid” technology to facilitate vehicle charging at night, when demand is low. By making use of underutilized generation and grid resources at off-peak times, EVs can help utilities make more efficient use of their assets and spread costs over a wider load without overtaxing the system.
PG&E demonstrated last year, in the first utility test of smart charging, that it could control vehicle charging through its SmartMeter™ infrastructure. But in a competitive marketplace, many customers may want to put control of their charging in other hands—such as the vehicle manufacturer or another trusted vendor. The whole process may someday be controlled by a third-party app on your smart phone.
(read more)

EV Week: Electric Vehicle Charging: A Pilot to Turn “Challenge” into “Opportunity” « A Smarter Planet Blog

By Jonathan Marshall, Chief, External Communications
Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Electric vehicle (EV) owners and electric utilities may soon enjoy a much closer and more fulfilling relationship than traditional car owners have with gas stations, thanks to a new pilot project announced today by IBM, Honda Motors, and Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). This collaboration aims to demonstrate the ability to optimize the charge schedule for each customer’s EV battery so that the needs of customers and the electric grid are satisfied on an ongoing basis. That’s still a stretch for most utilities.

When the typical power engineer hears “electric vehicle,” he or she usually thinks: “challenge.” A plug-in vehicle can draw as much power as three homes in the more temperate parts of California. An enthusiastic bunch of early adopters could potentially overload local circuits if they all charge up at the same time in the same neighborhood.

But PG&E is thinking instead, “opportunity.” For one thing, we have a growing number of clean electric vehicles in our own fleet, from Chevy Volts to a new class of extended-range pickup trucks from Via Motors. And we know that widespread adoption of EVs throughout California will help the state meet its ambitious clean-air goals.

For another, we believe there’s great potential for using the latest “smart grid” technology to facilitate vehicle charging at night, when demand is low. By making use of underutilized generation and grid resources at off-peak times, EVs can help utilities make more efficient use of their assets and spread costs over a wider load without overtaxing the system.

PG&E demonstrated last year, in the first utility test of smart charging, that it could control vehicle charging through its SmartMeter™ infrastructure. But in a competitive marketplace, many customers may want to put control of their charging in other hands—such as the vehicle manufacturer or another trusted vendor. The whole process may someday be controlled by a third-party app on your smart phone.

(read more)

“Confessions of a Chevy Volt Owner.” A surprising, frank interview with an owner of a Volt after one year of driving.
203 miles per gallon in the first year at 16,000 miles. Not a typo. His previous car, a Volvo, got 18 miles per gallon. (I get about 28 mpg in my ol’ benz.)
“I wish I bought the car. I absolutely love it.” He leased it because he was skeptical of owning it. But, wishes he bought it.
“I didn’t buy it to save money.” The biggest surprise here. He bought it to help eliminate the need for oil.
“My home electricity bill is about the same as when my daughter lived here in high school.” After a year of plugging it in to his home, his electricity bill remains the same and didn’t go up as expected.
He responds to the common criticism, “The Chevy Cruze is cheaper.” “Well, a bicycle is even cheaper and saves more gas than the Cruze. So is a used car. So is walking. Look, this isn’t about money, it’s about oil.”

The interview is short and surprising. Have a look.

via climateadaptation:

“Confessions of a Chevy Volt Owner.” A surprising, frank interview with an owner of a Volt after one year of driving.

  • 203 miles per gallon in the first year at 16,000 miles. Not a typo. His previous car, a Volvo, got 18 miles per gallon. (I get about 28 mpg in my ol’ benz.)
  • “I wish I bought the car. I absolutely love it.” He leased it because he was skeptical of owning it. But, wishes he bought it.
  • “I didn’t buy it to save money.” The biggest surprise here. He bought it to help eliminate the need for oil.
  • “My home electricity bill is about the same as when my daughter lived here in high school.” After a year of plugging it in to his home, his electricity bill remains the same and didn’t go up as expected.
  • He responds to the common criticism, “The Chevy Cruze is cheaper.” “Well, a bicycle is even cheaper and saves more gas than the Cruze. So is a used car. So is walking. Look, this isn’t about money, it’s about oil.”

The interview is short and surprising. Have a look.

via climateadaptation:

(via climateadaptation)

Battery breakthrough could bring electric cars to all |  GigaOM
A startup working on battery technology says it’s developed a key  breakthrough that could one day lead to an electric car that has a  300-mile range and could cost around $25,000 to $30,000. Envia Systems,  backed by venture capitalists, General Motors, and the Department of  Energy, plans to announce on Monday at the ARPA-E conference that the  company has created a lithium ion battery that has an energy density of  400 watt-hours per kilogram, which Envia CEO Atul Kapadia told me in an  interview could be the tipping point for bringing electric cars to  mainstream car owner.
The secret sauce
Energy density is how much energy a battery can store and provide for  the car with a given battery size — the more energy dense the battery,  the less volume and weight is needed. For electric cars it is  particularly important to have a high energy dense battery because  electric cars need to be as light weight as possible (any extra weight  just drains the battery faster), and batteries that are smaller and use  less materials can also be lower in cost

Battery breakthrough could bring electric cars to all |  GigaOM

A startup working on battery technology says it’s developed a key breakthrough that could one day lead to an electric car that has a 300-mile range and could cost around $25,000 to $30,000. Envia Systems, backed by venture capitalists, General Motors, and the Department of Energy, plans to announce on Monday at the ARPA-E conference that the company has created a lithium ion battery that has an energy density of 400 watt-hours per kilogram, which Envia CEO Atul Kapadia told me in an interview could be the tipping point for bringing electric cars to mainstream car owner.

The secret sauce

Energy density is how much energy a battery can store and provide for the car with a given battery size — the more energy dense the battery, the less volume and weight is needed. For electric cars it is particularly important to have a high energy dense battery because electric cars need to be as light weight as possible (any extra weight just drains the battery faster), and batteries that are smaller and use less materials can also be lower in cost