BBC - Future - Technology - Tomorrow’s world: A guide to the next 150 years
As we begin a new year, BBC Future has compiled 40 intriguing predictions made by scientists, politicians, journalists, bloggers and other assorted pundits in recent years about the shape of the world from 2013 to 2150.

BBC - Future - Technology - Tomorrow’s world: A guide to the next 150 years

As we begin a new year, BBC Future has compiled 40 intriguing predictions made by scientists, politicians, journalists, bloggers and other assorted pundits in recent years about the shape of the world from 2013 to 2150.

The hot tech gig of 2022: Data scientist - Fortune Tech
By the end of the decade 50 billion devices will be emitting information nonstop. Data scientists will help manage it all.
A decade from now the smart techies who decided to become app developers may wish they had taken an applied-mathematics class or two. The coming deluge of data (more on that in a moment) will create demand for a new kind of computer scientist — a gig that’s one part mathematician, one part product-development guru, and one part detective.
D.J. Patil is a pioneer in the field of data science, a new discipline that aims to organize and make sense of all the data generated by machines. It’s a challenge that will grow exponentially over the next decade.
Tech in 2012: Face-offs, failures and fairly big changes at the office
Today there are some 400 million devices connected to the Internet, mostly phones and computers. By 2020 some 50 billion devices, from cars to appliances, will be talking to one another. And companies will need teams of data scientists like Patil to sort through everything from internal inventory metrics to customer tweets. The role is so important that Greylock Partners has hired Patil to serve as a “data scientist in residence” to help its portfolio companies mine their data for patterns or stats that will make them more efficient or smarter than their competitors.

The hot tech gig of 2022: Data scientist - Fortune Tech

By the end of the decade 50 billion devices will be emitting information nonstop. Data scientists will help manage it all.

A decade from now the smart techies who decided to become app developers may wish they had taken an applied-mathematics class or two. The coming deluge of data (more on that in a moment) will create demand for a new kind of computer scientist — a gig that’s one part mathematician, one part product-development guru, and one part detective.

D.J. Patil is a pioneer in the field of data science, a new discipline that aims to organize and make sense of all the data generated by machines. It’s a challenge that will grow exponentially over the next decade.

Tech in 2012: Face-offs, failures and fairly big changes at the office

Today there are some 400 million devices connected to the Internet, mostly phones and computers. By 2020 some 50 billion devices, from cars to appliances, will be talking to one another. And companies will need teams of data scientists like Patil to sort through everything from internal inventory metrics to customer tweets. The role is so important that Greylock Partners has hired Patil to serve as a “data scientist in residence” to help its portfolio companies mine their data for patterns or stats that will make them more efficient or smarter than their competitors.


3D Printing On Street Corners: A Future Scenario? — The Pop-Up City

Rapid prototyping is still the domain of nerds, but it’s just a matter of time before 3D printers become mass consumer products. With its Kiosk project, Antwerp-based design studio Unfold explores a future scenario in which digital fabricators are so ubiquitous that we see them appear on street corners, just like fast food is sold on the streets of New York City. 


The designers developed the concept for a mobile cart inspired by Bruce Sterling’s science fiction short story Kiosk and equipped with 3D printing technologies.
Advanced

via futuramb:

3D Printing On Street Corners: A Future Scenario? — The Pop-Up City

Rapid prototyping is still the domain of nerds, but it’s just a matter of time before 3D printers become mass consumer products. With its Kiosk project, Antwerp-based design studio Unfold explores a future scenario in which digital fabricators are so ubiquitous that we see them appear on street corners, just like fast food is sold on the streets of New York City. 

The designers developed the concept for a mobile cart inspired by Bruce Sterling’s science fiction short story Kiosk and equipped with 3D printing technologies.

Advanced

via futuramb:

“Who Can Fix Health Care?” Al Mulley’s talk at TEDx Dartmouth | e-Patients.net

This is an interesting speech where the speaker is arguing that neither the government nor doctors can transform health care, but the collective of patients can.

Yes, people are already doing this. At least for themselves… But the question is still what the doctors and the government should do. Government is responsible for the structure and financing decisions and doctors are responsible for the value system, organizing and delivering care. Both of these major groups are actually completely locked up in a structure which defies change… Their responsibility should at least be to dismount the structures in order to allow the required reorganizing! Otherwise nothing will happen at all… That the patients are not able to do at all!!

via futuramb:

Elon Musk: I’ll put a man on Mars in 10 years | KurzweilAI

SpaceX will launch a rocket into orbit in three years and will “go all the way to Mars” in 10 to 20 years, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said on The Wall Street Journal MarketWatch Friday.

The statement follows a SpaceX announcement last week that NASA has awarded the company $75 million to develop a revolutionary launch escape system that will enable the company’s Dragon spacecraft to carry astronauts.

Elon Musk: I’ll put a man on Mars in 10 years | KurzweilAI SpaceX will launch a rocket into orbit in three years and will “go all the way to Mars” in 10 to 20 years, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said on The Wall Street Journal MarketWatch Friday. The statement follows a SpaceX announcement last week that NASA has awarded the company $75 million to develop a revolutionary launch escape system that will enable the company’s Dragon spacecraft to carry astronauts.

THE SUPERSTAR: Self-Sustaining City of the Future
Source: Inhabitat
Beijing based MAD Architects has a new concept for a traveling and  self-sufficient city. The traveling city will produce its own power and  food while recycling its own waste. Their is still doubt whether the  project will come to fruition but a model is planned for the 11th annual  Venice Bienalle.

THE SUPERSTAR: Self-Sustaining City of the Future

Source: Inhabitat

Beijing based MAD Architects has a new concept for a traveling and self-sufficient city. The traveling city will produce its own power and food while recycling its own waste. Their is still doubt whether the project will come to fruition but a model is planned for the 11th annual Venice Bienalle.

Sony Nextep Computer Concept for 2020 by Hiromi Kiriki » Yanko Design
Our present need for internet connectivity is so profound that secondary devices like the Nextep Computer are bound to happen. Developed to be worn as a bracelet, this computer concept is constructed out of a flexible OLED touchscreen. Earmarked for the year 2020, features like a holographic projector (for screen), pull-out extra keyboard panels and social networking compatibility, make the concept plausible. Ten years from now is not too far away, so how many of you think we’d be buying such gadgets?  

Sony Nextep Computer Concept for 2020 by Hiromi Kiriki » Yanko Design

Our present need for internet connectivity is so profound that secondary devices like the Nextep Computer are bound to happen. Developed to be worn as a bracelet, this computer concept is constructed out of a flexible OLED touchscreen. Earmarked for the year 2020, features like a holographic projector (for screen), pull-out extra keyboard panels and social networking compatibility, make the concept plausible. Ten years from now is not too far away, so how many of you think we’d be buying such gadgets?  

Ubiquitous Computing Just as the personal computer was a symbol of the ’80s, the symbol of the ’90s is the World Wide Web. Well, the next shift, the next nonlinear shift, is going to be the advent of cheap sensors— eyes, ears and sensory organs for our computers and our networks. Paul Saffo - Institute of the Future, 1997 http://www.saffo.com/aboutps/interviews/infoworld.php