Hangouts With James Fee: The Future of GIS - Spatially Adjusted

This week we talked about the future of GIS. 

Next week? The always entertaining Sean Gorman and I will talk about real time visualization of spatial data and if we ask nicely what is in store for GeoIQ.

Luckily, as the need for geographic literacy has increased, digital cartography has exploded. Interactive maps and location-based services have unleashed a torrent of spatial tools throughout the past few years, making everything from analysis to sophisticated Web applications accessible.
There are a bevy of tools available, but here’s an introduction to those that make up my open-source GIS suite.

Geostellar Demo

First public presentation of Geostellar capabilities. Geostellar is an Earth intelligence platform for the energy industry. We support sustainable development projects with high-resolution resource, infrastructure, production, policy and economic models derived from satellite, airborne and field sensor feeds.

smartercities:

SkyHook and SimpleGeo Present SpotRank, Now You Can Always Find Where The People Are - O’Reilly Radar
Skyhook Wireless released a huge set of location trend data. SpotRank, as the data is called, shares out ranking trends for locations around the world. The maps above show the SpotRanks of those locations.  

smartercities:

SkyHook and SimpleGeo Present SpotRank, Now You Can Always Find Where The People Are - O’Reilly Radar

Skyhook Wireless released a huge set of location trend data. SpotRank, as the data is called, shares out ranking trends for locations around the world. The maps above show the SpotRanks of those locations.  

spime:

NASA uses a “SLEUTH” to predict urban land use. The SLEUTH model is a tightly coupled, modified cellular automaton model of urban growth (and other land class change) which has been applied to over 100 cities and regions over the last decade.

spime:

NASA uses a “SLEUTH” to predict urban land use. The SLEUTH model is a tightly coupled, modified cellular automaton model of urban growth (and other land class change) which has been applied to over 100 cities and regions over the last decade.

On Wednesday, Google announced that it would open its servers to geographic data belonging to anyone. This means that developers will be able to quickly build a location-based Web service without having to also manage their own data server. (via Technology Review: Google Grabs More Geo-Data)

On Wednesday, Google announced that it would open its servers to geographic data belonging to anyone. This means that developers will be able to quickly build a location-based Web service without having to also manage their own data server. (via Technology Review: Google Grabs More Geo-Data)

The geoweb is going 3D. Google is bringing Google Earth into the browser via a plug-in. Photosynth, 3D photo collection creator and viewer, is moving into the Microsoft’s Virtual Earth team (this was posted about on July 26th; the post was removed, but is still findable in the cache’s of both Google and Live). Google’s Panoramio, a location-oriented photo-sharing site, has released their own 3D-ish photo viewer (see the Sydney Opera House and launch coverage on Google Earth Blog). And the geo teams of both Google and Microsoft have their own 3D modelers, Sketchup and trueSpace (more info) respectively. earthmine measuring building However the imagery that you see in VE or Google is not 3D. That is where Earthmine, a Berkeley-based startup is hoping to come in (Radar post). They are currently mapping four cities with NASA technology and a custom-designed camera rig. Each pixel in an image is assigned 3D coordinate. Capturing this data allows for a multitude of future applications. (via Earthmine: Imagery for a 3D Geoweb - O’Reilly Radar)

The geoweb is going 3D. Google is bringing Google Earth into the browser via a plug-in. Photosynth, 3D photo collection creator and viewer, is moving into the Microsoft’s Virtual Earth team (this was posted about on July 26th; the post was removed, but is still findable in the cache’s of both Google and Live). Google’s Panoramio, a location-oriented photo-sharing site, has released their own 3D-ish photo viewer (see the Sydney Opera House and launch coverage on Google Earth Blog). And the geo teams of both Google and Microsoft have their own 3D modelers, Sketchup and trueSpace (more info) respectively. earthmine measuring building However the imagery that you see in VE or Google is not 3D. That is where Earthmine, a Berkeley-based startup is hoping to come in (Radar post). They are currently mapping four cities with NASA technology and a custom-designed camera rig. Each pixel in an image is assigned 3D coordinate. Capturing this data allows for a multitude of future applications. (via Earthmine: Imagery for a 3D Geoweb - O’Reilly Radar)

Making history in national disaster relief

As a direct result of Senator Judd Gregg’s leadership on the Senate Appropriations Committee, funding was provided to develop a new hand-held, web-based technology that is now transforming how critical disaster relief assistance is being sped to the victims of major disasters both in the US and overseas.

Making history in national disaster relief - Fosters

L.A: Accessing GIS data to protect the community

Los Angeles replaced its legacy database to provide a more comprehensive set of data to improve critical decision-making in emergency situations.

IBM - IBM & ESRI Case Study