Five Ways The Government Can Create Sustainable Innovation | Co.Exist
The government doesn’t have the best track record when investing directly in sustainable companies, but there is a lot it can do to create an environment conducive to real innovation. This is how it should do it in Obama’s second term.

Five Ways The Government Can Create Sustainable Innovation | Co.Exist

The government doesn’t have the best track record when investing directly in sustainable companies, but there is a lot it can do to create an environment conducive to real innovation. This is how it should do it in Obama’s second term.

How Obama Used Big Data to Rally Voters | MIT Technology Review
After the voters returned Obama to office for a second term, his campaign became celebrated for its use of technology—much of it developed by an unusual team of coders and engineers—that redefined how individuals could use the Web, social media, and smartphones to participate in the political process. A mobile app allowed a canvasser to download and return walk sheets without ever entering a campaign office; a Web platform called Dashboard gamified volunteer activity by ranking the most active supporters; and “targeted sharing” protocols mined an Obama backer’s Facebook network in search of friends the campaign wanted to register, mobilize, or persuade.
But underneath all that were scores describing particular voters: a new political currency that predicted the behavior of individual humans. The campaign didn’t just know who you were; it knew exactly how it could turn you into the type of person it wanted you to be.

How Obama Used Big Data to Rally Voters | MIT Technology Review

After the voters returned Obama to office for a second term, his campaign became celebrated for its use of technology—much of it developed by an unusual team of coders and engineers—that redefined how individuals could use the Web, social media, and smartphones to participate in the political process. A mobile app allowed a canvasser to download and return walk sheets without ever entering a campaign office; a Web platform called Dashboard gamified volunteer activity by ranking the most active supporters; and “targeted sharing” protocols mined an Obama backer’s Facebook network in search of friends the campaign wanted to register, mobilize, or persuade.

But underneath all that were scores describing particular voters: a new political currency that predicted the behavior of individual humans. The campaign didn’t just know who you were; it knew exactly how it could turn you into the type of person it wanted you to be.

Bringing Hidden Healthcare Data Into the Open | Wired Business | Wired.com
As anyone who has had the courage to research a sore throat or mystery rash online knows, there is an overabundance of information available to help you try and get a handle on what ails you. What has been missing, however, is easy access to other kinds of medical information that have a direct bearing on healthcare, including a patient’s own medical records, test results, copies of X-rays and MRIs, and how one doctor performs when compared to others in his or her area of expertise. Enter self-described health IT hacktivist and author Fred Trotter, who, with a bit of crowdfunding cash, and a whole lot of patience, has hatched a plan to bring hidden healthcare data into the open.

Bringing Hidden Healthcare Data Into the Open | Wired Business | Wired.com

As anyone who has had the courage to research a sore throat or mystery rash online knows, there is an overabundance of information available to help you try and get a handle on what ails you. What has been missing, however, is easy access to other kinds of medical information that have a direct bearing on healthcare, including a patient’s own medical records, test results, copies of X-rays and MRIs, and how one doctor performs when compared to others in his or her area of expertise. Enter self-described health IT hacktivist and author Fred Trotter, who, with a bit of crowdfunding cash, and a whole lot of patience, has hatched a plan to bring hidden healthcare data into the open.

Nate Silver and Political Data: Every One of His State-level Presidential Predictions Proved True

Beyond just personal vindication, Silver has proven to the public the power of Big Data in transforming our electoral process.  We already rely on statistical models to do everything from flying our airplanes to predicting the weather.  This serves as yet another example of computers showing their ability to be better at handling the unknown than loud-talking experts.

http://pulse.me/s/fb1Z8

Dear Nate Silver:
My name is Emma Gertlowitz and I’m eleven years old and for a million years I liked Justin Bieber because he was so cute but now I like you. I watched you on MSNBC and HBO and on “Charlie Rose” and I can’t stop thinking about how you study polls and create probability models and predict elections and how you’re always right, which I think is so unbelievably cute, and I keep imagining you saying to me, “Emma, I think that there’s a 93.7% chance of me falling in love with you…”

Read “A Date with Nate,” one girl’s love letter to Nate Silver, by Paul Rudnick

(via newyorker)

(via newyorker)

New DARPA RFP Calls for All-In-One HUD that Sees Through Smoke, In The Dark and In Broad Daylight
DARPA wants a multi-band head-up display, which could be mounted to a helmet or a weapon scope, that combines several wavelengths of light into one image.
Sunny? No problem—the camera can see in visible light. Smoke bomb blocking your view? No sweat; the camera can see thermal infrared signatures. The system would also have near-infrared capability to help users see through darkness.
A new DARPA project called the Pixel Network for Dynamic Visualization (PIXNET) seeks proposals for new sensors that can do all of this in one package. A successful proposal would be small, lightweight, low-power and low-cost, said Nibir Dhar, DARPA program manager for PIXNET.
The system would communicate wirelessly with Android-based smart phones to fuse the images together, like you can see in the inset above. The warfighter would see a scene with visible imagery, thermal sensitivity and near-IR capability all in one.
Existing sensors are a good starting point, but they’re not advanced enough to combine multiple functions the way DARPA wants. Combining reflective and thermal bands will be a challenge, not to mention making it ultra-portable. “What we really need are breakthroughs in aperture design, focal plane arrays, electronics, packaging and materials science,” Dhar said.
(via DARPA Wants Cheap Head-Up Displays That Work In Any Kind Of Light | Popular Science)

New DARPA RFP Calls for All-In-One HUD that Sees Through Smoke, In The Dark and In Broad Daylight

DARPA wants a multi-band head-up display, which could be mounted to a helmet or a weapon scope, that combines several wavelengths of light into one image.

Sunny? No problem—the camera can see in visible light. Smoke bomb blocking your view? No sweat; the camera can see thermal infrared signatures. The system would also have near-infrared capability to help users see through darkness.

A new DARPA project called the Pixel Network for Dynamic Visualization (PIXNET) seeks proposals for new sensors that can do all of this in one package. A successful proposal would be small, lightweight, low-power and low-cost, said Nibir Dhar, DARPA program manager for PIXNET.

The system would communicate wirelessly with Android-based smart phones to fuse the images together, like you can see in the inset above. The warfighter would see a scene with visible imagery, thermal sensitivity and near-IR capability all in one.

Existing sensors are a good starting point, but they’re not advanced enough to combine multiple functions the way DARPA wants. Combining reflective and thermal bands will be a challenge, not to mention making it ultra-portable. “What we really need are breakthroughs in aperture design, focal plane arrays, electronics, packaging and materials science,” Dhar said.

(via DARPA Wants Cheap Head-Up Displays That Work In Any Kind Of Light | Popular Science)

(via joshbyard)

smartercities:

What Exactly Is A Smart City? | Co.Exist
Having worked in the smart cities space for several years now, I am encouraged by the growth of the sector and the pace of technological advancements being developed for urban environments. However, I believe that the smart-cities movement is being held back by a lack of clarity and consensus around what a smart city is and what the components of a smart city actually are.
While some people continue to take a narrow view of smart cities by seeing them as places that make better use of information and communication technology (ICT), the cities I work with (and most of the participants in the #smartchat, a monthly Twitterchat about smart cities held on the first Wednesday of each month) all view smart cities as a broad, integrated approach to improving the efficiency of city operations, the quality of life for its citizens, and growing the local economy.
Later this year, I’ll publish my annual rankings of smart cities here on Co.Exist. In order to improve them, I have been working on a new rubric for smart cities, that I call the Smart Cities Wheel.

smartercities:

What Exactly Is A Smart City? | Co.Exist

Having worked in the smart cities space for several years now, I am encouraged by the growth of the sector and the pace of technological advancements being developed for urban environments. However, I believe that the smart-cities movement is being held back by a lack of clarity and consensus around what a smart city is and what the components of a smart city actually are.

While some people continue to take a narrow view of smart cities by seeing them as places that make better use of information and communication technology (ICT), the cities I work with (and most of the participants in the #smartchat, a monthly Twitterchat about smart cities held on the first Wednesday of each month) all view smart cities as a broad, integrated approach to improving the efficiency of city operations, the quality of life for its citizens, and growing the local economy.

Later this year, I’ll publish my annual rankings of smart cities here on Co.Exist. In order to improve them, I have been working on a new rubric for smart cities, that I call the Smart Cities Wheel.

Social-Media Insights Inspired By America’s First Truly Social President | Fast Company
No politician in history has leveraged social media to the extent of President Obama. Here’s how his administration stays ahead of the curve—and what you can learn about effective social brand-building from the Tweep-in-Chief.

Social-Media Insights Inspired By America’s First Truly Social President | Fast Company

No politician in history has leveraged social media to the extent of President Obama. Here’s how his administration stays ahead of the curve—and what you can learn about effective social brand-building from the Tweep-in-Chief.

(via futuristgerd)

Building a Smarter Malaga | Citizen IBM Blog


The IBM Smarter Cities Challenge has reinforced and contributed to the goals of the Málaga II Strategic Plan, whose strong commitment with the Technology has allowed the City to make a significant progress towards a Smart City in different citizen services in the last years. Working with IBM’s Smarter Cities team, the objective was to create a framework for a sustainable economy by developing actionable recommendations to enhance our competitiveness. These include:

  • Creating a measurable economic strategy
  • Enhancing public-private collaboration
  • Reinforcing Málaga’s branding strategy
  • Making better use of open data