Graphene Ultracapacitors Offer Blistering Performance and Charge in a Couple of Minutes
Researchers at the University of California are developing graphene supercapacitors that can charge and discharge in a couple of minutes. The ability to discharge in a couple of minutes means that they are extremely powerful. More importantly though, these researchers developed a technique for printing graphene supercapacitors using a DVD burner.
The researchers dissolved graphite oxide in water and heated it with a laser from a standard DVD burner to obtain flexible graphene sheets. These graphene sheets are one-atom thick, yet can hold a remarkable amount of energy, while being charged or discharged in very little time compared to standard batteries.
Ultracapacitors have tremendous advantages over typical lithium-ion batteries, some of which are of paramount importance to the adoption of electric cars, such as their ability to charge in as little as 1 second, and last 20 years (easily, and with very heavy usage).

Graphene Ultracapacitors Offer Blistering Performance and Charge in a Couple of Minutes

Researchers at the University of California are developing graphene supercapacitors that can charge and discharge in a couple of minutes. The ability to discharge in a couple of minutes means that they are extremely powerful. More importantly though, these researchers developed a technique for printing graphene supercapacitors using a DVD burner.

The researchers dissolved graphite oxide in water and heated it with a laser from a standard DVD burner to obtain flexible graphene sheets. These graphene sheets are one-atom thick, yet can hold a remarkable amount of energy, while being charged or discharged in very little time compared to standard batteries.

Ultracapacitors have tremendous advantages over typical lithium-ion batteries, some of which are of paramount importance to the adoption of electric cars, such as their ability to charge in as little as 1 second, and last 20 years (easily, and with very heavy usage).

New wonder material replaces graphene for future electronic devices | KurzweilAI
Entirely new kinds of devices —- entire walls of light, smart windows, eyeglass displays, complex electronic circuits —- from new 2D molybdenum disulfide: MIT researchers
MIT researchers — who struggled for several years to build electronic circuits out of graphene with very limited results (except for radio-frequency applications) — have now succeeded in making a variety of electronic components from an amazing new material: a 2D version of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2).
The MIT researchers say the material could help usher in radically new products, from whole walls that glow to clothing with embedded electronics to glasses with built-in display screens.

New wonder material replaces graphene for future electronic devices | KurzweilAI

Entirely new kinds of devices —- entire walls of light, smart windows, eyeglass displays, complex electronic circuits —- from new 2D molybdenum disulfide: MIT researchers

MIT researchers — who struggled for several years to build electronic circuits out of graphene with very limited results (except for radio-frequency applications) — have now succeeded in making a variety of electronic components from an amazing new material: a 2D version of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2).

The MIT researchers say the material could help usher in radically new products, from whole walls that glow to clothing with embedded electronics to glasses with built-in display screens.

New material could enable wearable electronics.
The University of Exeter in England have created the most transparent, lightweight and flexible material ever for conducting electricity. Called GraphExeter, the material could revolutionise the creation of wearable electronic devices, such as clothing containing computers, phones and MP3 players.
GraphExeter could also be used for the creation of ‘smart’ mirrors or windows, with computerised interactive features. Since this material is also transparent over a wide light spectrum, it could enhance by more than 30% the efficiency of solar panels.
Adapted from graphene, GraphExeter is much more flexible than indium tin oxide (ITO), the main conductive material currently used in electronics. ITO is becoming increasingly expensive and is a finite resource, expected to run out in 2017.
To create GraphExeter, the Exeter team sandwiched molecules of ferric chloride between two layers of graphene. Ferric chloride enhances the electrical conductivity of graphene, without affecting the material’s transparency.
via 8bitfuture:

New material could enable wearable electronics.

The University of Exeter in England have created the most transparent, lightweight and flexible material ever for conducting electricity. Called GraphExeter, the material could revolutionise the creation of wearable electronic devices, such as clothing containing computers, phones and MP3 players.

GraphExeter could also be used for the creation of ‘smart’ mirrors or windows, with computerised interactive features. Since this material is also transparent over a wide light spectrum, it could enhance by more than 30% the efficiency of solar panels.

Adapted from graphene, GraphExeter is much more flexible than indium tin oxide (ITO), the main conductive material currently used in electronics. ITO is becoming increasingly expensive and is a finite resource, expected to run out in 2017.

To create GraphExeter, the Exeter team sandwiched molecules of ferric chloride between two layers of graphene. Ferric chloride enhances the electrical conductivity of graphene, without affecting the material’s transparency.

via 8bitfuture:

(via 8bitfuture)

Graphene Foam Sensors Cheaply Detect Trace Particles in Air Ten Times Better Than Current Tech | Popular Science
Nanotechnology as a discipline is bleeding-edge cool, but so often we  hear more about its amazing potential than its practical application.  So it’s always refreshing to catch wind of a story like this:  Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York have  developed and demonstrated a small, relatively inexpensive, and reusable  sensor made of graphene foam that far outperforms commercial gas sensors on the market today and  could lead to better explosives detectors and environmental sensors in  the very near future.
The new sensor dispenses with a lot of the limitations that have been  holding back sensors in this space. In the last several years, many  strides have been made in the science of manipulating nanostructures to  be excellent detectors of very fine trace elements of chemicals on the  air. But these sensors, while great in theory, are impractical in actual  service.

Graphene Foam Sensors Cheaply Detect Trace Particles in Air Ten Times Better Than Current Tech | Popular Science

Nanotechnology as a discipline is bleeding-edge cool, but so often we hear more about its amazing potential than its practical application. So it’s always refreshing to catch wind of a story like this: Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York have developed and demonstrated a small, relatively inexpensive, and reusable sensor made of graphene foam that far outperforms commercial gas sensors on the market today and could lead to better explosives detectors and environmental sensors in the very near future.

The new sensor dispenses with a lot of the limitations that have been holding back sensors in this space. In the last several years, many strides have been made in the science of manipulating nanostructures to be excellent detectors of very fine trace elements of chemicals on the air. But these sensors, while great in theory, are impractical in actual service.

Future gadget batteries could last 10 times longer | GigaOm
Batteries continue to be the bane of mobile devices, but research done at Northwestern University could change that with longer lasting batteries that charge in minutes, not hours.  The new science shouldn’t increase the size of batteries, but instead  modifies the chemical reaction that takes place inside lithium-ion power  packs, allowing for 10 times the capacity, says PC Mag.  Don’t run out to the store looking for these batteries just yet,  though: They’re not expected to hit the market for 3 to 5 years.
According to Northwestern’s Professor Harold Kung, the longer-lasting  batteries take advantage of two new processes. First, the number of  lithium-ion atoms in the battery’s electrode are boosted by using  silicon in place of carbon between sheets of graphene in the battery. It  sounds complicated, but the gist is this: Silicon works 24 times more  efficiently with lithium ions compared to carbon, which is used in  traditional batteries.
Second, the research team scored the graphine sheets with microscopic  holes, allowing the lithium ions to travel faster within the battery.  These techniques improve both the recharge time and density of lithium  ions, which equates to longer-lasting batteries with fast recharge  times; perhaps as little as 15 minutes.

Future gadget batteries could last 10 times longer | GigaOm

Batteries continue to be the bane of mobile devices, but research done at Northwestern University could change that with longer lasting batteries that charge in minutes, not hours. The new science shouldn’t increase the size of batteries, but instead modifies the chemical reaction that takes place inside lithium-ion power packs, allowing for 10 times the capacity, says PC Mag. Don’t run out to the store looking for these batteries just yet, though: They’re not expected to hit the market for 3 to 5 years.

According to Northwestern’s Professor Harold Kung, the longer-lasting batteries take advantage of two new processes. First, the number of lithium-ion atoms in the battery’s electrode are boosted by using silicon in place of carbon between sheets of graphene in the battery. It sounds complicated, but the gist is this: Silicon works 24 times more efficiently with lithium ions compared to carbon, which is used in traditional batteries.

Second, the research team scored the graphine sheets with microscopic holes, allowing the lithium ions to travel faster within the battery. These techniques improve both the recharge time and density of lithium ions, which equates to longer-lasting batteries with fast recharge times; perhaps as little as 15 minutes.

Graphene-powered web could download 3-D movies in seconds, give MPAA nightmares
Graphene, is there anything it can’t do? Researchers are already trying to put it in processors, fuel cells, and batteries — now your internet connection might get ten-times faster thanks to  the silicon successor.
Researchers at UC Berkeley have created tiny,  one-atom-thick modulators that could switch the data-carrying light on  and off in a fiber-optic connection much faster than current technology.

Graphene-powered web could download 3-D movies in seconds, give MPAA nightmares

Graphene, is there anything it can’t do? Researchers are already trying to put it in processors, fuel cells, and batteries — now your internet connection might get ten-times faster thanks to the silicon successor.

Researchers at UC Berkeley have created tiny, one-atom-thick modulators that could switch the data-carrying light on and off in a fiber-optic connection much faster than current technology.

Graphene Films Enabling Miracle Nanomaterials
Source: Smarter Technology

Pure carbon thin-films just nanometers thick are enabling a new era of miracle applications, from windshields so slick they don’t require wipers to thermoelectric materials that drastically reduce energy generation costs by harvesting waste heat.

Graphene—pure carbon thin-film—has a wide variety of uses beyond its potential in semiconductor manufacturing, from reducing the drag on ships’ hulls to recovering lost energy at coal-fired electricity generation plants, according to separate research projects at Vanderbilt University and the Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) at Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland).

Graphene Films Enabling Miracle Nanomaterials

Source: Smarter Technology

  • Pure carbon thin-films just nanometers thick are enabling a new era of miracle applications, from windshields so slick they don’t require wipers to thermoelectric materials that drastically reduce energy generation costs by harvesting waste heat.
  • Graphene—pure carbon thin-film—has a wide variety of uses beyond its potential in semiconductor manufacturing, from reducing the drag on ships’ hulls to recovering lost energy at coal-fired electricity generation plants, according to separate research projects at Vanderbilt University and the Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) at Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland).

phdr:

DNA Passing Through Graphene Nanopore As sad as it sounds, I’m a big fan of graphene. This 1nm thick single layer of carbon atoms takes on interesting properties that graphite (which is made up of lots of layers of graphene) doesn’t have. Every week there seems to be advances in different applications: ultrafast transistors, chemical sensors  or touch screen technologies.
Over the past few months several papers have been detailing ways in which graphene can be used to translocate DNA, or to put it simply, pull it through a hole (as shown in the above picture). The latest work, published in Nature, started by using a layer of graphene as a membrane to separate two liquid reservoirs, demonstrating that the graphene  can stop the flow of ions across it when a voltage is applied. When a nanoscale hole is present ions can pass through the membrane, with flow increasing as the size of the hole increases, meaning an increase in electric current that can measured. (Imagine a bucket divided in two by a plastic sheet: if the top half of the bucket is filled with water, it cannot flow to the bottom half because of the sheet, but if the sheet has a puncture the water can flow to the bottom half and a bigger hole results in a bigger flow of water).
It’s this property that may allow cheap DNA sequencing, an area that is always looking for ways to bring the cost of the process down. DNA is negatively charged so would be dragged through the  hole, the same as other charged molecules. As it does the bases on the DNA partially blocks the hole meaning the rate of the smaller ions flowing through the hole changes. These changes in current  might be used to identify the bases passing through the hole: each base on a strand of DNA (A, C, G or T) blocks the hole to a different extent, therefore changing the current.
At the moment each base takes about 10 nanoseconds to pass through the hole, that is too quick to measure a change in current, so one of the next tasks is to slow DNA translocation down. Another task is to be able to measure the minute changes in current over background noise. If these can be solved, then it might be possible to achieve relatively cheap genome sequencing.
Read more at ScienceDaily or PhysicsWorld
‘Graphene as a subnanometre trans-electrode membrane’ S. Garaj et al. Nature 467, 190-193 (2010)
Find the paper here (subscription required)

phdr:

DNA Passing Through Graphene Nanopore As sad as it sounds, I’m a big fan of graphene. This 1nm thick single layer of carbon atoms takes on interesting properties that graphite (which is made up of lots of layers of graphene) doesn’t have. Every week there seems to be advances in different applications: ultrafast transistors, chemical sensors or touch screen technologies.

Over the past few months several papers have been detailing ways in which graphene can be used to translocate DNA, or to put it simply, pull it through a hole (as shown in the above picture). The latest work, published in Nature, started by using a layer of graphene as a membrane to separate two liquid reservoirs, demonstrating that the graphene can stop the flow of ions across it when a voltage is applied. When a nanoscale hole is present ions can pass through the membrane, with flow increasing as the size of the hole increases, meaning an increase in electric current that can measured. (Imagine a bucket divided in two by a plastic sheet: if the top half of the bucket is filled with water, it cannot flow to the bottom half because of the sheet, but if the sheet has a puncture the water can flow to the bottom half and a bigger hole results in a bigger flow of water).

It’s this property that may allow cheap DNA sequencing, an area that is always looking for ways to bring the cost of the process down. DNA is negatively charged so would be dragged through the hole, the same as other charged molecules. As it does the bases on the DNA partially blocks the hole meaning the rate of the smaller ions flowing through the hole changes. These changes in current might be used to identify the bases passing through the hole: each base on a strand of DNA (A, C, G or T) blocks the hole to a different extent, therefore changing the current.

At the moment each base takes about 10 nanoseconds to pass through the hole, that is too quick to measure a change in current, so one of the next tasks is to slow DNA translocation down. Another task is to be able to measure the minute changes in current over background noise. If these can be solved, then it might be possible to achieve relatively cheap genome sequencing.

Read more at ScienceDaily or PhysicsWorld

‘Graphene as a subnanometre trans-electrode membrane’ S. Garaj et al. Nature 467, 190-193 (2010)

Find the paper here (subscription required)

Research Breakthrough Could Pave Way for Low-Cost, Flexible Solar Cells - Global Challenges
Solar energy has had several exciting breakthroughs recently, such as efficiency gains from nanotechnology and the possibility for application of carbon nanowires. Still, solar energy—which has low efficiency and takes up space—has a long way to go before it can become mainstream. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) have made an important innovation for green energy—one that could lead to supple, low-cost solar cells. For many decades, scientists have proposed the use of organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells for use in solar energy. The advantages of OPV cells include their low cost, ease of manufacture, flexibility and light weight. In order for OPV cells to be used in photo-electronic devices, they must include transparent conductive electrodes. Light uses such electrodes to produce electricity. Graphene, a highly conductive and transparent substance made from thin sheets of carbon, could be used in OPV cells for solar energy. Because graphene is difficult to manufacture in high quantity and quality levels, however, its uses have been limited.

Research Breakthrough Could Pave Way for Low-Cost, Flexible Solar Cells - Global Challenges

Solar energy has had several exciting breakthroughs recently, such as efficiency gains from nanotechnology and the possibility for application of carbon nanowires. Still, solar energy—which has low efficiency and takes up space—has a long way to go before it can become mainstream. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) have made an important innovation for green energy—one that could lead to supple, low-cost solar cells. For many decades, scientists have proposed the use of organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells for use in solar energy. The advantages of OPV cells include their low cost, ease of manufacture, flexibility and light weight. In order for OPV cells to be used in photo-electronic devices, they must include transparent conductive electrodes. Light uses such electrodes to produce electricity. Graphene, a highly conductive and transparent substance made from thin sheets of carbon, could be used in OPV cells for solar energy. Because graphene is difficult to manufacture in high quantity and quality levels, however, its uses have been limited.