What Would You Do With 600,000 Years of Computing Power? « A Smarter Planet Blog

Juan Hindo, Program Manager, Citizenship & Corporate Affairs, IBM

By Juan Hindo

Today, World Community Grid celebrates eight years of bringing together volunteers from around the world to support humanitarian research. World Community Grid taps the spare computational power of computers volunteered by the general public and provides it – free of charge – to scientists who might not otherwise have access to the intensive computing power they require for timely, humanitarian research.

 In eight years, our volunteers have provided research scientists with the equivalent of more than 600,000 years of computing power to seek cures and new treatments for many diseases, identify clean sources of energy and seek to improve water quality. These projects have yielded more than 30 peer-reviewed scientific papers – industry recognition of scientific research being advanced by World Community Grid.

Continue reading at Citizen IBM.

Service rewards computer owners for their idle CPU time
Much the way the SETI@home project taps volunteers’ computers for processing help in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, so Oregon-based CPUsage offers crowdsourced computing power as well. This time, however, the CPU resources are put to work for business purposes, with solutions optimized for science, rendering and high-throughput computing. READ MORE…
via springwise:

Service rewards computer owners for their idle CPU time

Much the way the SETI@home project taps volunteers’ computers for processing help in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, so Oregon-based CPUsage offers crowdsourced computing power as well. This time, however, the CPU resources are put to work for business purposes, with solutions optimized for science, rendering and high-throughput computing. READ MORE…

via springwise:

How Watson’s $1 Million Jeopardy Win Helps IBM’s Other Supercomputer
Source: Fast Company

After crushing the humanoids on Jeopardy this week, IBM’s Watson computer took home $1 million in prize money. Instead of throwing it away on Tiffany diamond-encrusted circuit boards or a Lamborghini to show up other supercomputers, Watson is showing that its silicon heart is in the right place. Half the money will go to the World Vision, a nonprofit that helps children in poverty, the other half to World Community Grid, IBM’s humanitarian supercomputer.
As we chronicled last year, World Community Grid, or WCG, is an enormous volunteer computer network dedicated to scientific research. Ordinary citizens donate their idle laptops and desktops to be used for crunching algorithms and conducting mathematical experiments that accelerate research on clean energy and high-yield rice crops as well as cures for cancer, AIDS, muscular dystrophy, and other diseases. IBM started the free,open-source lab in 2004 to make a virtual supercomputer available to researchers who couldn’t otherwise afford one.
Half of Watson’s winnings, $500,000, will be given to scientists who apply for grants to use the WCG. The publicity should only help the grid grow beyond the 535,000 participants (and 1.7 million computers) in more than 80 countries. Yesterday, as word spread of the grid’s windfall, 1,300 people signed up, seven times more than on a typical day. (The Daily Septuple perhaps?)

How Watson’s $1 Million Jeopardy Win Helps IBM’s Other Supercomputer

Source: Fast Company

After crushing the humanoids on Jeopardy this week, IBM’s Watson computer took home $1 million in prize money. Instead of throwing it away on Tiffany diamond-encrusted circuit boards or a Lamborghini to show up other supercomputers, Watson is showing that its silicon heart is in the right place. Half the money will go to the World Vision, a nonprofit that helps children in poverty, the other half to World Community Grid, IBM’s humanitarian supercomputer.

As we chronicled last year, World Community Grid, or WCG, is an enormous volunteer computer network dedicated to scientific research. Ordinary citizens donate their idle laptops and desktops to be used for crunching algorithms and conducting mathematical experiments that accelerate research on clean energy and high-yield rice crops as well as cures for cancer, AIDS, muscular dystrophy, and other diseases. IBM started the free,open-source lab in 2004 to make a virtual supercomputer available to researchers who couldn’t otherwise afford one.

Half of Watson’s winnings, $500,000, will be given to scientists who apply for grants to use the WCG. The publicity should only help the grid grow beyond the 535,000 participants (and 1.7 million computers) in more than 80 countries. Yesterday, as word spread of the grid’s windfall, 1,300 people signed up, seven times more than on a typical day. (The Daily Septuple perhaps?)

IBM’s World Community Grid Turns Focus to Water | Sustainable Life Media
World Community Grid, a network of PC owners who donate their unused computing power to solve humanitarian and sustainability challenges, is teaming up with three projects aimed at producing cleaner water – a serious issue for over 1 billion people and increasingly a concern for forward looking-businesses. To accelerate the pace, lower the expense, and increase the precision of these projects, scientists will harness the IBM-supported World Community Grid to perform online simulations, crunch numbers, and pose hypothetical scenarios. The processing power is provided by a grid of 1.5 million PCs from 600,000 volunteers around the world - and is equivalent to one of the world’s fastest supercomputers. The University of Virginia Watershed Sustainability Project will use World Community Grid to power its “UVa Bay Game/Analytics” project, which models the effects of agricultural, commercial and industrial decisions on the Chesapeake Bay. The “Computing For Clean Water” project, started at China’s Tsinghua University Centre for Novel Multidisciplinary Mechanics, is developing ways to filter and scrub polluted water, as well as convert saltwater into drinkable freshwater, with less expense, complexity, and energy than current techniques. The third project, based in Brazil, is seeking a cure for a common parasite based disease – schistosomiasis – prevalent in tropical regions and transmitted via foul water. 

IBM’s World Community Grid Turns Focus to Water | Sustainable Life Media

World Community Grid, a network of PC owners who donate their unused computing power to solve humanitarian and sustainability challenges, is teaming up with three projects aimed at producing cleaner water – a serious issue for over 1 billion people and increasingly a concern for forward looking-businesses. To accelerate the pace, lower the expense, and increase the precision of these projects, scientists will harness the IBM-supported World Community Grid to perform online simulations, crunch numbers, and pose hypothetical scenarios. The processing power is provided by a grid of 1.5 million PCs from 600,000 volunteers around the world - and is equivalent to one of the world’s fastest supercomputers. The University of Virginia Watershed Sustainability Project will use World Community Grid to power its “UVa Bay Game/Analytics” project, which models the effects of agricultural, commercial and industrial decisions on the Chesapeake Bay. The “Computing For Clean Water” project, started at China’s Tsinghua University Centre for Novel Multidisciplinary Mechanics, is developing ways to filter and scrub polluted water, as well as convert saltwater into drinkable freshwater, with less expense, complexity, and energy than current techniques. The third project, based in Brazil, is seeking a cure for a common parasite based disease – schistosomiasis – prevalent in tropical regions and transmitted via foul water. 

World Community Grid: Influenza Antiviral Drug Search Project
The mission: to find new drugs that can stop the spread of an influenza infection in the body.
Donate the time your computer is turned on, but is idle, to projects that benefit humanity! We provide the secure software that does it all for free, and you become part of a community that is helping to change the world.
(via Influenza Antiviral Drug Search)

World Community Grid: Influenza Antiviral Drug Search Project

The mission: to find new drugs that can stop the spread of an influenza infection in the body.

Donate the time your computer is turned on, but is idle, to projects that benefit humanity! We provide the secure software that does it all for free, and you become part of a community that is helping to change the world.

(via Influenza Antiviral Drug Search)

Brink, a new show The Science Channel, discusses how IBM’s Cell processor, the engine inside the Sony PlayStation 3, can be used for powerful grid computing for astrophysics . (via tsf17). See also the Folding@Home project.

Sony’s PlayStation 3 is no stranger to the supercomputing scene. The gaming console, which packs the potent Cell microprocessor, is one of the primary contributors to Stanford University’s Folding@home disease-fighting research project, which uses spare processing power from idling PS3s and PCs to undertake the arduous task of simulating protein folding, among other microbiological tasks. (via UMass launches DIY PS3 supercomputing site - GameSpot News Blog )

Sony’s PlayStation 3 is no stranger to the supercomputing scene. The gaming console, which packs the potent Cell microprocessor, is one of the primary contributors to Stanford University’s Folding@home disease-fighting research project, which uses spare processing power from idling PS3s and PCs to undertake the arduous task of simulating protein folding, among other microbiological tasks. (via UMass launches DIY PS3 supercomputing site - GameSpot News Blog )

IBM takes grid to the clouds and aids solar research

IBM and researchers from Harvard University are launching a new World Community Grid project to discover organic materials to create a more efficient and lower cost solar cell. The path-breaking effort will use idle computer power from volunteers to create large supplies of new clean energy.

Clean energy sources like solar could supply a vast amount of the world’s energy and help eliminate our dependence on fossil fuels, the cause of global warming, if they were more efficient and could be developed at lower cost to make them more widely available. (via Computer World)