Hacker Shows How To Attack An Airplane’s Systems—Using A Phone
A German security researcher has demonstrated how easy it can be to hack into the digital systems of an airliner in flight using the right coding knowledge and hardware that’s not hard to get—including a Samsung smartphone.
Here’s the story.

Hacker Shows How To Attack An Airplane’s Systems—Using A Phone

A German security researcher has demonstrated how easy it can be to hack into the digital systems of an airliner in flight using the right coding knowledge and hardware that’s not hard to get—including a Samsung smartphone.

Here’s the story.

MIT Builds An Open-Source Platform For Your Body | Fast Company
MIT Media Lab’s 11-day health care hackathon pulled students and big companies together with a common goal: Healing a broken industry.
Siberian temperatures. Eleven grueling days, navigating rough terrain. Six teams, matched for talent, competing for glory at the end. The Iditarod? Nah, just the annual MIT Health and Wellness Hackathon.
This isn’t your average social app-fest. The goal is to jump-start an open source platform where apps that track all different aspects of your bodily health can exchange information. It’s a Sisyphean task, since most digital health solutions today are trapped in silos, but the organizers believe they can change that by enfranchising big companies instead of trying to disrupt them.

MIT Builds An Open-Source Platform For Your Body | Fast Company

MIT Media Lab’s 11-day health care hackathon pulled students and big companies together with a common goal: Healing a broken industry.

Siberian temperatures. Eleven grueling days, navigating rough terrain. Six teams, matched for talent, competing for glory at the end. The Iditarod? Nah, just the annual MIT Health and Wellness Hackathon.

This isn’t your average social app-fest. The goal is to jump-start an open source platform where apps that track all different aspects of your bodily health can exchange information. It’s a Sisyphean task, since most digital health solutions today are trapped in silos, but the organizers believe they can change that by enfranchising big companies instead of trying to disrupt them.

Scientists Hack Kinect to Study Glaciers and Asteroids | Wired Science | Wired.com
Last summer, Ken Mankoff shimmied through zero degree water and mud  into a small cavern underneath Rieperbreen Glacier in Svalbard, Norway,  holding a Microsoft Kinect wrapped inside a waterproof bag.
Using the little toy, originally meant as a motion-sensing device for  the Xbox 360 video game console, Mankoff scanned the cave floor in 3D.  During the summer, water from lakes on the glacier’s surface had gushed  through the channel he was sitting in. The Kinect was going to provide a  better understanding of its size and roughness, which could help  researchers predict how the ice above would flow toward the sea.
“I’ve always enjoyed repurposing cheap devices, doing things that you’re not supposed to do with them,” said Mankoff,  a NASA funded Ph.D. student at the University of California, Santa Cruz  studying ice and ocean interactions. “You know, the hacker ideals.”
He is currently a bit of an evangelist for the Kinect, trying to get  scientist interested in using the device, which can record very accurate  3D data in visible and infrared wavelengths.

Scientists Hack Kinect to Study Glaciers and Asteroids | Wired Science | Wired.com

Last summer, Ken Mankoff shimmied through zero degree water and mud into a small cavern underneath Rieperbreen Glacier in Svalbard, Norway, holding a Microsoft Kinect wrapped inside a waterproof bag.

Using the little toy, originally meant as a motion-sensing device for the Xbox 360 video game console, Mankoff scanned the cave floor in 3D. During the summer, water from lakes on the glacier’s surface had gushed through the channel he was sitting in. The Kinect was going to provide a better understanding of its size and roughness, which could help researchers predict how the ice above would flow toward the sea.

“I’ve always enjoyed repurposing cheap devices, doing things that you’re not supposed to do with them,” said Mankoff, a NASA funded Ph.D. student at the University of California, Santa Cruz studying ice and ocean interactions. “You know, the hacker ideals.”

He is currently a bit of an evangelist for the Kinect, trying to get scientist interested in using the device, which can record very accurate 3D data in visible and infrared wavelengths.

Citibank, Sony PlayStation, Lockheed Martin, Gmail—it seems every day a new company is hacked, but instead of talking about or removing a threat that could cripple our government, we’re obsessing over Weinergate.
When are we finally going to answer the wakeup call?


DDoS Attacks Exceed 100 Gbps, Attack Surface Continues to Expand

2010 should be viewed as the year distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks became mainstream, says Arbor Networks. In its Sixth Annual Worldwide Infrastructure Security Report, released today, Arbor Networks revealed that DDoS attack Size broke 100 Gbps for first time; up 1000% Since 2005.
The year witnessed a sharp escalation in the scale and frequency of DDoS attack activity on the Internet with many high profile attacks launched against popular Internet services and other well known targets. In addition to hitting the 100 Gbps attack barrier for the first time, application layer attacks hit an all-time high.

» via 
infoneer-pulse:
 SecurityWeek


DDoS Attacks Exceed 100 Gbps, Attack Surface Continues to Expand

2010 should be viewed as the year distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks became mainstream, says Arbor Networks. In its Sixth Annual Worldwide Infrastructure Security Report, released today, Arbor Networks revealed that DDoS attack Size broke 100 Gbps for first time; up 1000% Since 2005.

The year witnessed a sharp escalation in the scale and frequency of DDoS attack activity on the Internet with many high profile attacks launched against popular Internet services and other well known targets. In addition to hitting the 100 Gbps attack barrier for the first time, application layer attacks hit an all-time high.

» via 

infoneer-pulse:

 SecurityWeek

Is the cyber threat a weapon of mass destruction? | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

steorfan:

Google’s surprise announcement of “a highly sophisticated and targeted attack” on its systems—a case of computer-aided espionage—has also raised the specter of offensive warfare. Defense News quotes Adm. Robert Willard of U.S. Pacific Command as declaring that “the skills being demonstrated” by Chinese hackers in the service of “exfiltrating data”—a fancy way of saying “spying”—are also relevant to “wartime computer network attacks.”
Reference: http://ping.fm/LO5PJ