Redesigning Highway Signs, To Talk To Your Smartphone | Co.Design
But the most radical components of Manual’s redesign can be found when you’re getting off the highway. The group’s proposal calls for every exit sign to be fitted with a wireless transmitter, connecting it to a smartphone app provided by the Department of Transportation. As drivers zoom down the interstate, the app would update dynamically with information on restaurants, gas stations, and local points of interest found at the exits ahead.

Redesigning Highway Signs, To Talk To Your Smartphone | Co.Design

But the most radical components of Manual’s redesign can be found when you’re getting off the highway. The group’s proposal calls for every exit sign to be fitted with a wireless transmitter, connecting it to a smartphone app provided by the Department of Transportation. As drivers zoom down the interstate, the app would update dynamically with information on restaurants, gas stations, and local points of interest found at the exits ahead.

Solar-powered glass roads the way of the future? 
Source: Autoblog
Scott Brusaw believes solar-powered glass roads will enable us to meet  our energy demands and provide heated roads that can melt snow. After  acquiring aid form  the federal government Brusaw  developed a prototype that seems quite promising. At 4.4 million per  mile the cost is steep but Brusaw argues that the roads would eventually  pay for themselves with savings in energy.

Solar-powered glass roads the way of the future?

Source: Autoblog

Scott Brusaw believes solar-powered glass roads will enable us to meet our energy demands and provide heated roads that can melt snow. After acquiring aid form  the federal government Brusaw developed a prototype that seems quite promising. At 4.4 million per mile the cost is steep but Brusaw argues that the roads would eventually pay for themselves with savings in energy.

Solar Roadways: The Prototype (via YERTiansThe Solar Roadways project is working to pave roads with solar panels that you can drive on. Co-founder Scott Brusaw has made some major steps forward since our first visit back in 2007, so we visited him again earlier this year for an exclusive update on the project, including the first ever video recorded of the Solar Roadways prototype! For more information visithttp://www.solarroadways.com .

Beyond ‘Real Time’ Reporting, Forecasting Future Traffic Jams - NYTimes.com
With huge increases in the use of traffic cameras, roadway sensors and  GPS-linked devices like cellphones, transportation agencies are now  grappling with a flood of data available to tell them how well vehicles  are (or are not) moving.
Collected and crunched by highway authorities and private companies, the  data can be shared with travelers through radio alerts, dashboard  navigation systems, Web sites and electronic road signs. “Real time” is  the phrase often used to convey the urgency of this information stream.
Trouble is, in many cases real-time traffic updates are just not fast enough.
I.B.M. is teaming up with the New Jersey Turnpike Authority to tackle this problem. The Smart Transportation initiative will use  I.B.M. software to predict traffic patterns up to an hour into the  future on state roads, including the New Jersey Turnpike and Garden  State Parkway.
A series of complex algorithms and analytics make up the software tool  that I.B.M. has engineered to instantly interpret the millions of bits  of data that flow into a traffic management center in Woodbridge, N.J.  But instead of just alerting drivers to accidents, bottlenecks and  dangerous conditions, the software will estimate what traffic will be  like in 10, 20 or more minutes, helping drivers to make choices.

Beyond ‘Real Time’ Reporting, Forecasting Future Traffic Jams - NYTimes.com

With huge increases in the use of traffic cameras, roadway sensors and GPS-linked devices like cellphones, transportation agencies are now grappling with a flood of data available to tell them how well vehicles are (or are not) moving.

Collected and crunched by highway authorities and private companies, the data can be shared with travelers through radio alerts, dashboard navigation systems, Web sites and electronic road signs. “Real time” is the phrase often used to convey the urgency of this information stream.

Trouble is, in many cases real-time traffic updates are just not fast enough.

I.B.M. is teaming up with the New Jersey Turnpike Authority to tackle this problem. The Smart Transportation initiative will use I.B.M. software to predict traffic patterns up to an hour into the future on state roads, including the New Jersey Turnpike and Garden State Parkway.

A series of complex algorithms and analytics make up the software tool that I.B.M. has engineered to instantly interpret the millions of bits of data that flow into a traffic management center in Woodbridge, N.J. But instead of just alerting drivers to accidents, bottlenecks and dangerous conditions, the software will estimate what traffic will be like in 10, 20 or more minutes, helping drivers to make choices.

How it works: Driving change in Stockholm
 It’s an issue in cities worldwide: too many cars on too few roads. And Stockholm, Sweden was no exception, with over half a million cars traveling into the city every weekday. By 2005, average commute times were up by 18 percent from the year before.

How it works: Driving change in Stockholm

It’s an issue in cities worldwide: too many cars on too few roads. And Stockholm, Sweden was no exception, with over half a million cars traveling into the city every weekday. By 2005, average commute times were up by 18 percent from the year before.