AT&T to launch Digital Life in 15 markets, hopes to enter home automation field
AT&T is finally set to launch its Digital Life home automation service, and it’s ready to do so in a big way. Initially planned for just eight markets, the telephony giant has expanded its coverage to 15 starting this spring, with the hope of 50 by the end of the year. Essentially a way to monitor your home, Digital Life packages may include live video, the ability to remotely toggle the light on and off, change the thermostat, unlock the door and more. Customers are able to set up programs and alerts via smartphone or tablet applications or the web. AT&T should bring some heavy clout to the home automation party, though it won’t be the first big-name communications company to do so. For more information on Digital Life and what it offers, have a peek at the source below.

 AT&T to launch Digital Life in 15 markets, hopes to enter home automation field

AT&T is finally set to launch its Digital Life home automation service, and it’s ready to do so in a big way. Initially planned for just eight markets, the telephony giant has expanded its coverage to 15 starting this spring, with the hope of 50 by the end of the year. Essentially a way to monitor your home, Digital Life packages may include live video, the ability to remotely toggle the light on and off, change the thermostat, unlock the door and more. Customers are able to set up programs and alerts via smartphone or tablet applications or the web. AT&T should bring some heavy clout to the home automation party, though it won’t be the first big-name communications company to do so. For more information on Digital Life and what it offers, have a peek at the source below.

Ubi & SmartThings

Check us out and support us on Kickstarter: http://kck.st/MRoc4m

The Ubi is an always-on, voice-activated Android-based computer that plugs into a standard wall outlet and listens for commands. SmartThings is an open platform for making it easy to connect and control physical devices with the Internet. Together, they can make anyone’s home incredibly smart!

Belkin WeMo Baby monitor lets you listen to Junior via an internet connection and an iOS device — Engadget

Belkin’s line of WeMo products is all about home automation, and its latest addition, the WeMo Baby, lets you listen to the cooing and crying of your offspring from afar. The device is a WiFi-enabled microphone that streams audio of your baby to up to six devices simultaneously — provided they’re running iOS 5 or higher and the free WeMo Baby companion app. That app’s powered by Evoz’s baby monitoring service and it works over a 3G, 4G, or WiFi connection. So, absentee parents can keep tabs on their bundle of joy whether they’re in another room or sneaking a cold one at the pub round the corner. What’s the price for such parental freedom? $90 when it goes on sale early next month. Full PR and an app screenshot can be found after the break.

Belkin WeMo Baby monitor lets you listen to Junior via an internet connection and an iOS device — Engadget

Belkin’s line of WeMo products is all about home automation, and its latest addition, the WeMo Baby, lets you listen to the cooing and crying of your offspring from afar. The device is a WiFi-enabled microphone that streams audio of your baby to up to six devices simultaneously — provided they’re running iOS 5 or higher and the free WeMo Baby companion app. That app’s powered by Evoz’s baby monitoring service and it works over a 3G, 4G, or WiFi connection. So, absentee parents can keep tabs on their bundle of joy whether they’re in another room or sneaking a cold one at the pub round the corner. What’s the price for such parental freedom? $90 when it goes on sale early next month. Full PR and an app screenshot can be found after the break.

Belkin WeMo Baby monitor lets you listen to junior via iOS devices

How your smartphone could give you a smart home, no extra smarts required | VentureBeat
Home automation still seems a little Tomorrowland, but Ube thinks it can make some parts of that dream a reality, even for the Homer Simpsons among us.
Ube is a startup focusing on bringing the Internet of things to life inside the connected home, starting with an iPhone app and three hardware products: Smart Dimmer, Smart Outlet, and Smart Plug.
“We have been working in the connected home space and consumer electronics space for over 25 years waiting for technology to become available which could simply and inexpensively solve this problem,” said Ube co-founder Glen Burchers in an email conversation with VentureBeat.
Ube, he says, can bring a centralized, cloud-based brain and central control system to all your home’s web-connected electronics. All you need is a smartphone, “no professional custom installation required.” Better still, it’s free.
Read more 

How your smartphone could give you a smart home, no extra smarts required | VentureBeat

Home automation still seems a little Tomorrowland, but Ube thinks it can make some parts of that dream a reality, even for the Homer Simpsons among us.

Ube is a startup focusing on bringing the Internet of things to life inside the connected home, starting with an iPhone app and three hardware products: Smart Dimmer, Smart Outlet, and Smart Plug.

“We have been working in the connected home space and consumer electronics space for over 25 years waiting for technology to become available which could simply and inexpensively solve this problem,” said Ube co-founder Glen Burchers in an email conversation with VentureBeat.

Ube, he says, can bring a centralized, cloud-based brain and central control system to all your home’s web-connected electronics. All you need is a smartphone, “no professional custom installation required.” Better still, it’s free.


Read more 

LIFX: The Light Bulb Reinvented by Phil Bosua — Kickstarter

LIFX is the smartest light bulb you’ve ever experienced. It’s a wifi-enabled, energy efficient, multi-colored bulb that you control with your iPhone or Android. LIFX gives you unprecedented control of your lights, reduces your energy costs, lasts up to 25 years and delivers an amazing range of experiences we think you’ll love.

Ubi plug-mounted Android device gives your phone eyes and ears in the home | Android Central
A Kickstarter project out of Toronto called Ubi recently reached its funding goal for a tiny Android-powered computer that plugs directly into a power socket. It’s riddled with sensors and hooks up to the local Wi-Fi network so it can push out notifications to your phone about the room’s conditions - lights, temperature, sound, movement… Even humidity. It’s got a full-sized USB and headphone jack and RF and Bluetooth capabilities for added connectivity. There’s an LED light on the back plus speakers so the Ubi can do some communicating of its own, plus a decent amount of horsepower under the hood to keep things running (800 MHz processor, 1 GB of RAM). The unit itself will ship with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean and is going to have its own app ecosystem with a handful launching with the device.
Voice-enabled Internet search
Speakerphone
Indicator light (light changing based on events, e.g. weather, stock, email)
Home speaker system with sound piping
Virtual assistant (audio calendar, feed reader, podcast etc)
Voice memos
Alarm clock
Intercom system
Baby monitor
Noise pollution monitor
Controlling the climate of your home perfectly (through web enabled thermostats like Nest) 

Ubi plug-mounted Android device gives your phone eyes and ears in the home | Android Central

A Kickstarter project out of Toronto called Ubi recently reached its funding goal for a tiny Android-powered computer that plugs directly into a power socket. It’s riddled with sensors and hooks up to the local Wi-Fi network so it can push out notifications to your phone about the room’s conditions - lights, temperature, sound, movement… Even humidity. It’s got a full-sized USB and headphone jack and RF and Bluetooth capabilities for added connectivity. There’s an LED light on the back plus speakers so the Ubi can do some communicating of its own, plus a decent amount of horsepower under the hood to keep things running (800 MHz processor, 1 GB of RAM). The unit itself will ship with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean and is going to have its own app ecosystem with a handful launching with the device.

  • Voice-enabled Internet search
  • Speakerphone
  • Indicator light (light changing based on events, e.g. weather, stock, email)
  • Home speaker system with sound piping
  • Virtual assistant (audio calendar, feed reader, podcast etc)
  • Voice memos
  • Alarm clock
  • Intercom system
  • Baby monitor
  • Noise pollution monitor
  • Controlling the climate of your home perfectly (through web enabled thermostats like Nest) 

Microsoft Research wants to automate your house, introduces HomeOS — Engadget
Ever wondered if you could control your house’s climate, security, and appliances — along with your PCs and peripherals — using Microsoft software? That day may soon dawn, as its Research arm has started testing its home automation software, called HomeOS, in twelve domiciles over the past few months. The budding system views smartphones, printers and air conditioners as network peripherals, controlled by a dedicated gateway computer. The project even has a handful of apps in play, which perform functions like energy monitoring, remote surveillance and face-recognition. This growing list of applications, available through a portal called “HomeStore”, will allow users to easily expand their system’s capabilities. So how does it all work out in the real world? Head past the break, and let Redmond’s research team give you the skinny.

Microsoft Research wants to automate your house, introduces HomeOS — Engadget

Ever wondered if you could control your house’s climate, security, and appliances — along with your PCs and peripherals — using Microsoft software? That day may soon dawn, as its Research arm has started testing its home automation software, called HomeOS, in twelve domiciles over the past few months. The budding system views smartphones, printers and air conditioners as network peripherals, controlled by a dedicated gateway computer. The project even has a handful of apps in play, which perform functions like energy monitoring, remote surveillance and face-recognition. This growing list of applications, available through a portal called “HomeStore”, will allow users to easily expand their system’s capabilities. So how does it all work out in the real world? Head past the break, and let Redmond’s research team give you the skinny.

New Touchscreen Thermostat for Smarter Homes | Environmental Leader
Lighting control manufacturer Lutron Electronics has expanded its line of temperature controls with the addition of a co-branded Honeywell touchscreen thermostat called TouchPRO (pictured). The thermostat communicates with Lutron systems that also control lights, shades and stand-by power from small appliances. The TouchPRO thermostat can be ordered starting September 12, with a suggested list price of $450. 

New Touchscreen Thermostat for Smarter Homes | Environmental Leader

Lighting control manufacturer Lutron Electronics has expanded its line of temperature controls with the addition of a co-branded Honeywell touchscreen thermostat called TouchPRO (pictured). The thermostat communicates with Lutron systems that also control lights, shades and stand-by power from small appliances. The TouchPRO thermostat can be ordered starting September 12, with a suggested list price of $450. 

Google I/O 2011: Google wants to control your home | CNNMoney 
First Google dominated the Web with search. Then it ruled mobile  devices with Android. Now Google wants to control everything inside your  home.
At its annual I/O developers conference in San Francisco on  Tuesday, the company previewed Android@Home, a future platform that  will allow you to interact with practically any electronic device you  own using Google.  Connected devices like home media equipment, dishwashers, cars, and  lights could soon be able to be controlled using the new platform.

Google I/O 2011: Google wants to control your home | CNNMoney

First Google dominated the Web with search. Then it ruled mobile devices with Android. Now Google wants to control everything inside your home.

At its annual I/O developers conference in San Francisco on Tuesday, the company previewed Android@Home, a future platform that will allow you to interact with practically any electronic device you own using Google. Connected devices like home media equipment, dishwashers, cars, and lights could soon be able to be controlled using the new platform.

Home’s electrical wiring acts as antenna to receive low-power sensor data
The walls do have ears, thanks to a device that uses a home’s electrical wiring as a giant antenna. Sensors developed by researchers at the University of Washington and the Georgia Institute of Technology use residential wiring to transmit information to and from almost anywhere in the home, allowing for wireless sensors that run for decades on a single watch battery. The technology, which could be used in home automation or medical monitoring, will be presented this month at the Ubiquitous Computing conference in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Home’s electrical wiring acts as antenna to receive low-power sensor data

The walls do have ears, thanks to a device that uses a home’s electrical wiring as a giant antenna. Sensors developed by researchers at the University of Washington and the Georgia Institute of Technology use residential wiring to transmit information to and from almost anywhere in the home, allowing for wireless sensors that run for decades on a single watch battery. The technology, which could be used in home automation or medical monitoring, will be presented this month at the Ubiquitous Computing conference in Copenhagen, Denmark.