Transmitting high-speed data via LED room lights | KurzweilAI
Scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI) in Berlin have developed a new high-speed data transmission technology for video data.
Using an optical WLAN, the scientists were able to transfer data at a rate of 100 megabits per second over a ten square meters area without any loss, by modulating white LEDs in the ceiling.
The scientists were able to transfer four videos at HD quality to four different laptops at the same time. A simple photodiode on the laptop or other devices acts as a receiver.One disadvantage is that when something gets between the light and the photodiode, the transfer is impaired.
The new transmission technology is suitable for hospitals, where high data rates are required, but radio transmissions are not allowed — it could allow for controlling wireless surgical robots or sending x-ray images. In airplanes, passenger could view their own entertainment program on a display, saving aircraft manufacturers the cost and weight of miles of cables

Transmitting high-speed data via LED room lights | KurzweilAI

Scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI) in Berlin have developed a new high-speed data transmission technology for video data.

Using an optical WLAN, the scientists were able to transfer data at a rate of 100 megabits per second over a ten square meters area without any loss, by modulating white LEDs in the ceiling.

The scientists were able to transfer four videos at HD quality to four different laptops at the same time. A simple photodiode on the laptop or other devices acts as a receiver.One disadvantage is that when something gets between the light and the photodiode, the transfer is impaired.

The new transmission technology is suitable for hospitals, where high data rates are required, but radio transmissions are not allowed — it could allow for controlling wireless surgical robots or sending x-ray images. In airplanes, passenger could view their own entertainment program on a display, saving aircraft manufacturers the cost and weight of miles of cables

Viridity Energy Raises $14 Million To Turn Power Consumers Into Producers
Founded in 2008, Viridity Energy offers “distributed demand management software, systems and services,” that can turn very energy-consuming businesses into producers and sellers of power back to the grid. Viridity’s technology can also help companies get paid to control and reduce their energy consumption. The company’s customers to-date have been retailers, hospitals, universities and various military and government agencies. In Philadelphia, Viridity set up systems for the transit authority (SEPTA) that capture energy released by braking, electric subway trains, and store it in rail-side battery arrays, routing the power back through the third rail to reuse it for trains’ acceleration. 

Viridity Energy Raises $14 Million To Turn Power Consumers Into Producers

Founded in 2008, Viridity Energy offers “distributed demand management software, systems and services,” that can turn very energy-consuming businesses into producers and sellers of power back to the grid. Viridity’s technology can also help companies get paid to control and reduce their energy consumption. The company’s customers to-date have been retailers, hospitals, universities and various military and government agencies. In Philadelphia, Viridity set up systems for the transit authority (SEPTA) that capture energy released by braking, electric subway trains, and store it in rail-side battery arrays, routing the power back through the third rail to reuse it for trains’ acceleration. 

UPMC Smart Room for Healthcare
 IBM and UPMC (University of Pittsburgh Medical Center) are teaming up to bring “smarter” hospital rooms to patients nationwide. Created by UPMC three years ago to bring the right patient information to the bedside when it’s needed, the high-tech “smart room” now features new capabilities, namely a system for automatically organizing and prioritizing the work of nurses and other caregivers. Under a new agreement, IBM will be the exclusive sales channel for the SmartRoom solution and will help to implement the technology for customers.
Smart Room is a health IT solutions company focused on improving clinical workflow and providing in-context information for clinicians at the bedside. Smart Room, jointly funded by UPMC and IBM, is headquartered in Pittsburgh, PA. Working in close collaboration with clinicians and hospital executives, Smart Room innovates the delivery of health care by eliminating tasks and helping clinicians more easily navigate patient information. This allows caregivers to spend more time providing high quality care to their patients.
UPMC is an $8 billion integrated global health enterprise headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and one of the leading nonprofit health systems in the United States. As western Pennsylvania’s largest employer, with almost 50,000 employees, UPMC is transforming the economy of the region into one based on medicine, research and technology. By integrating 20 hospitals, 400 doctors’ offices and outpatient sites, long-term care facilities and a major health insurance services division, and in collaboration with its academic partner, the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences, UPMC has advanced the quality and efficiency of health care and developed internationally renowned programs in transplantation, cancer, neurosurgery, psychiatry, orthopaedics, and sports medicine, among others.
Solutions
Smart Room Simplifies Patient Care
Smart Room’s solutions allow clinicians to spend more time with patients and help improve outcomes…by spending less time:
Documenting
Repeating steps
Backtracking
Smart Room redefines the meaning of “workflow solution.”   Caregivers  are alerted to which tasks should be completed next, saving both time  and effort.
Smart Room Puts Information at Your Fingertips
For Caregivers 
Smart Room’s caregiver touch screen allows clinicians to chart critical information in the patient room, resulting in:
Immediate documentation as care is complete
Improved infection control
Less alerts and interruptions through proactive learning
Transparent communication between caregivers, patients and patients’ families via the patient information screen
Fewer errors due to automated data population in the electronic medical record (EMR) 
Quick access to information at the bedside
For Patients and Families
Smart Room’s patient interactive screen provides the patient with  several education, communication, and entertainment features, resulting  in:
More educated patients by involving them and their family in the care process in a more collaborative way
Higher patient satisfaction by increasing a patient’s  understanding of medical procedures and processes and providing easy  communication with their family and friends
Smart Room closes the “EMR Gap”
Smart Room allows hospitals to obtain more value from their EMR  investments. As an EMR-independent solution, it integrates seamlessly  with existing systems. Caregivers are able to spend less time charting  at a computer located away from their patients, and can spend more time  doing what they love: caring for their patients.

UPMC Smart Room for Healthcare

 IBM and UPMC (University of Pittsburgh Medical Center) are teaming up to bring “smarter” hospital rooms to patients nationwide. Created by UPMC three years ago to bring the right patient information to the bedside when it’s needed, the high-tech “smart room” now features new capabilities, namely a system for automatically organizing and prioritizing the work of nurses and other caregivers. Under a new agreement, IBM will be the exclusive sales channel for the SmartRoom solution and will help to implement the technology for customers.

Smart Room is a health IT solutions company focused on improving clinical workflow and providing in-context information for clinicians at the bedside. Smart Room, jointly funded by UPMC and IBM, is headquartered in Pittsburgh, PA. Working in close collaboration with clinicians and hospital executives, Smart Room innovates the delivery of health care by eliminating tasks and helping clinicians more easily navigate patient information. This allows caregivers to spend more time providing high quality care to their patients.

UPMC is an $8 billion integrated global health enterprise headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and one of the leading nonprofit health systems in the United States. As western Pennsylvania’s largest employer, with almost 50,000 employees, UPMC is transforming the economy of the region into one based on medicine, research and technology. By integrating 20 hospitals, 400 doctors’ offices and outpatient sites, long-term care facilities and a major health insurance services division, and in collaboration with its academic partner, the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences, UPMC has advanced the quality and efficiency of health care and developed internationally renowned programs in transplantation, cancer, neurosurgery, psychiatry, orthopaedics, and sports medicine, among others.

Solutions

Smart Room Simplifies Patient Care

Smart Room’s solutions allow clinicians to spend more time with patients and help improve outcomes…by spending less time:

  • Documenting
  • Repeating steps
  • Backtracking

Smart Room redefines the meaning of “workflow solution.” Caregivers are alerted to which tasks should be completed next, saving both time and effort.

Smart Room Puts Information at Your Fingertips

For Caregivers

Smart Room’s caregiver touch screen allows clinicians to chart critical information in the patient room, resulting in:

  • Immediate documentation as care is complete
  • Improved infection control
  • Less alerts and interruptions through proactive learning
  • Transparent communication between caregivers, patients and patients’ families via the patient information screen
  • Fewer errors due to automated data population in the electronic medical record (EMR)
  • Quick access to information at the bedside

For Patients and Families

Smart Room’s patient interactive screen provides the patient with several education, communication, and entertainment features, resulting in:

  • More educated patients by involving them and their family in the care process in a more collaborative way
  • Higher patient satisfaction by increasing a patient’s understanding of medical procedures and processes and providing easy communication with their family and friends

Smart Room closes the “EMR Gap”

Smart Room allows hospitals to obtain more value from their EMR investments. As an EMR-independent solution, it integrates seamlessly with existing systems. Caregivers are able to spend less time charting at a computer located away from their patients, and can spend more time doing what they love: caring for their patients.

FOAK Tales: A Prescription for Prediction (via IBMLabs)

True stories from IBM’s First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) program, which pairs IBM researchers with clients to bring incredible discoveries and possibilities into view. This first episode brings you the wonderful tale about how IBM researchers and clients came together to create an innovative solution for a hospital based on clever stream computing software.

Charts showing how much US residents pay for health care compared to people in other countries - Boing Boing
Four graphs created by the International Federation of Health Plans that compare how much US residents and people in other countries pay for health care. As Jay Livingston of the Montclair SocioBlog says, “Our Lipitor must be four to ten times a good as the Lipitor that Canadians take.”

Charts showing how much US residents pay for health care compared to people in other countries - Boing Boing

Four graphs created by the International Federation of Health Plans that compare how much US residents and people in other countries pay for health care. As Jay Livingston of the Montclair SocioBlog says, “Our Lipitor must be four to ten times a good as the Lipitor that Canadians take.”

The “hand breathalyser” bit is a wall-mounted sensor system mounted in the hospital washrooms. After washing their hands, medics put them into the sensor. Provided that a suitable level of sanitiser chemicals are detected, the badge is wirelessly updated and a green light illuminates on the sensor. (via June R&D Round Up - Sensors)

The “hand breathalyser” bit is a wall-mounted sensor system mounted in the hospital washrooms. After washing their hands, medics put them into the sensor. Provided that a suitable level of sanitiser chemicals are detected, the badge is wirelessly updated and a green light illuminates on the sensor. (via June R&D Round Up - Sensors)