Implantable Tumor Tracker Is a Tiny Lab That Lives Inside Your Body And Reports Back | Popular Science



Rather than bringing people into the lab, researchers at MIT are putting tiny labs into people via a tiny implantable capsule that can track the growth of a tumor or detect heart-deterioration or even silent heart attacks from inside the body. The miniature lab is small enough to implant via a needle during a normal biopsy, and can remain inside the body vigilantly watching for increased tumor growth. The inside of the device is filled with nanoparticles, each sporting an antibody specially designed to bind to specific molecules like those that are produced by certain kinds of tumors or by damaged heart muscle cells.


via joshbyard:

Implantable Tumor Tracker Is a Tiny Lab That Lives Inside Your Body And Reports Back | Popular Science

Rather than bringing people into the lab, researchers at MIT are putting tiny labs into people via a tiny implantable capsule that can track the growth of a tumor or detect heart-deterioration or even silent heart attacks from inside the body. The miniature lab is small enough to implant via a needle during a normal biopsy, and can remain inside the body vigilantly watching for increased tumor growth. The inside of the device is filled with nanoparticles, each sporting an antibody specially designed to bind to specific molecules like those that are produced by certain kinds of tumors or by damaged heart muscle cells.

via joshbyard:

Computer  Chip Implant to Program Brain Activity, Treat Parkinson’s | Singularity  Hub
An international team of researchers led by Dr. Matti Mintz at the University of Tel Aviv is working on a biomimetic computer chip for brain stimulation that is programmable, responsive to neural activity, and capable of bridging broken connections in the brain. Called the Rehabilitation Nano Chip, or ReNaChip, the device could be used to replace diseased or damaged brain tissue, restore brain functions lost to aging, and even treat epilepsy. The chip is currently in animal testing, but should reach human applications within a few years.

Computer Chip Implant to Program Brain Activity, Treat Parkinson’s | Singularity Hub

An international team of researchers led by Dr. Matti Mintz at the University of Tel Aviv is working on a biomimetic computer chip for brain stimulation that is programmable, responsive to neural activity, and capable of bridging broken connections in the brain. Called the Rehabilitation Nano Chip, or ReNaChip, the device could be used to replace diseased or damaged brain tissue, restore brain functions lost to aging, and even treat epilepsy. The chip is currently in animal testing, but should reach human applications within a few years.

MIT engineers have been working on a mathematical model that can be used to map out the patterns of turbulence formed by drug eluting stents. With this knowledge it is possible to predict which designs will be less favorable to the formation of stent induced clots, and so let engineers work around potentially bad shapes (via Model Helps Develop Better Cardiac Stent Designs - Medgadget )

MIT engineers have been working on a mathematical model that can be used to map out the patterns of turbulence formed by drug eluting stents. With this knowledge it is possible to predict which designs will be less favorable to the formation of stent induced clots, and so let engineers work around potentially bad shapes (via Model Helps Develop Better Cardiac Stent Designs - Medgadget )

Electronic Vision via Artificial Retina

Second Sight Medical Products has developed Argus Two, a sophisticated eye-implant device for the blind with an array of 60 electrodes, providing a much sharper image to its users than its earlier device, Argus One, with 16 electrodes, creating a 4 by 4 pattern of light and dark spots. Argus Two consists of a tiny camera mounted on a pair of dark glasses and a hip-mounted microprocessor, produced for the U.S. Energy Department’s Artificial Retina Project.

Electrospinning is a process that uses an electrical charge to turn polymers into extremely thin fibres that are ‘spun’ to form a mat of fine fibres … In this case, nanosized hair- like structures, a thousand times thinner than the width of a human hair, are electrospun at MNTC and added to the surface of an orthopaedic implant to create a ‘living interface’ between the artificial implants and living bone. Not only does this improve the performance of the implants it also significantly increases their durability to last the lifetime of the patient. (via 'Intelligent' Materials To Revolutionize Surgical Implants)

Electrospinning is a process that uses an electrical charge to turn polymers into extremely thin fibres that are ‘spun’ to form a mat of fine fibres … In this case, nanosized hair- like structures, a thousand times thinner than the width of a human hair, are electrospun at MNTC and added to the surface of an orthopaedic implant to create a ‘living interface’ between the artificial implants and living bone. Not only does this improve the performance of the implants it also significantly increases their durability to last the lifetime of the patient. (via 'Intelligent' Materials To Revolutionize Surgical Implants)