The Changing Goals of Data Visualization | eagereyes
The visual representation of data has gone through a number of phases, with its goals switching back and forth between analysis and presentation over time. Many introductions to visualization tend to portray historical examples as all being done for the same purpose. That, I argue in this short, incomplete, and cherry-picked history, is not true.
Early to Mid–1800s: Playfair, Nightingale, Snow, Minard
The first uses of graphics to represent data, interestingly, were very bare and abstract, and at the same time were mostly tools for communication. The abstract nature of these early charts is surprising when you consider the amount of ornamentation and decoration that was common with even simple household objects in the early to middle of the 19th century. John Snow’s and Charles Minard’s maps were downright stark compared with many maps drawn at the time.

The Changing Goals of Data Visualization | eagereyes

The visual representation of data has gone through a number of phases, with its goals switching back and forth between analysis and presentation over time. Many introductions to visualization tend to portray historical examples as all being done for the same purpose. That, I argue in this short, incomplete, and cherry-picked history, is not true.

Early to Mid–1800s: Playfair, Nightingale, Snow, Minard

The first uses of graphics to represent data, interestingly, were very bare and abstract, and at the same time were mostly tools for communication. The abstract nature of these early charts is surprising when you consider the amount of ornamentation and decoration that was common with even simple household objects in the early to middle of the 19th century. John Snow’s and Charles Minard’s maps were downright stark compared with many maps drawn at the time.

7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast? (by npr)

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

As higher standards of living and better health care are reaching more parts of the world, the rates of fertility — and population growth — have started to slow down, though the population will continue to grow for the foreseeable future.

U.N. forecasts suggest the world population could hit a peak of 10.1 billion by 2100 before beginning to decline. But exact numbers are hard to come by — just small variations in fertility rates could mean a population of 15 billion by the end of the century.

Produced by Adam Cole
Cinematography by Maggie Starbard

We just released all of our most recent magazine’s content up on our site. GOOD 024: The Data Issue is our look at the world of data, and the ways in which it influences—both negatively and positively—our lives. 
Click through to see all of the amazing stories. And, if you haven’t yet, be sure to pick up a copy, since it really is so nice to hold in your hands and flip through. 
via good:

We just released all of our most recent magazine’s content up on our site. GOOD 024: The Data Issue is our look at the world of data, and the ways in which it influences—both negatively and positively—our lives. 

Click through to see all of the amazing stories. And, if you haven’t yet, be sure to pick up a copy, since it really is so nice to hold in your hands and flip through. 

via good:

The Internet of Things, in an infographic – a timely look at how connected sensors are shaping our world, as we prepare for MoMA’s Talk to Me show on that very subject, opening next week. 
via curiositycounts:

The Internet of Things, in an infographic – a timely look at how connected sensors are shaping our world, as we prepare for MoMA’s Talk to Me show on that very subject, opening next week. 

via curiositycounts:

(via futuristgerd)

 Cool Infographics | The Map of the Internet
The Map of the Internet is an ambitious project from Peer 1 Hosting that maps the network of  hosts and routing connections that are the foundation of the Internet.   Clicking on the image above takes you to the poster in an interactive zooming viewer so you  can see the details.  You can also read about the making of the poster  in this post on the Peer 1 Hosting blog.

It’s a layout of all the networks that are  interconnected to form the internet. Some are run by small and large  ISPs, university networks, and customer networks - such as Facebook and  Google. It’s visual representation of all those networks interconnecting  with one another, forming the internet as we know it. Based on the size  of the nodes and the thickness of the lines, it speaks to the size of  those particular providers and the connections. 
In technical speak, you’re looking at all the  autonomous systems that make up the internet. Each autonomous system is a  network operated by a single organization, and has routing connections  to some number of neighbouring autonomous systems. The image depicts a  graph of 19,869 autonomous system nodes, joined by 44,344 connections.  The sizing and layout of the autonomous systems is based on their  eigenvector centrality, which is a measure of how central to the network  each autonomous system is: an autonomous system is central if it is  connected to other autonomous systems that are central.

 Cool Infographics | The Map of the Internet

The Map of the Internet is an ambitious project from Peer 1 Hosting that maps the network of hosts and routing connections that are the foundation of the Internet.  Clicking on the image above takes you to the poster in an interactive zooming viewer so you can see the details.  You can also read about the making of the poster in this post on the Peer 1 Hosting blog.

It’s a layout of all the networks that are interconnected to form the internet. Some are run by small and large ISPs, university networks, and customer networks - such as Facebook and Google. It’s visual representation of all those networks interconnecting with one another, forming the internet as we know it. Based on the size of the nodes and the thickness of the lines, it speaks to the size of those particular providers and the connections. 

In technical speak, you’re looking at all the autonomous systems that make up the internet. Each autonomous system is a network operated by a single organization, and has routing connections to some number of neighbouring autonomous systems. The image depicts a graph of 19,869 autonomous system nodes, joined by 44,344 connections. The sizing and layout of the autonomous systems is based on their eigenvector centrality, which is a measure of how central to the network each autonomous system is: an autonomous system is central if it is connected to other autonomous systems that are central.

Infographics  news: Visualizing crowdsourcing: Trendsmap
We all know nytimes.com is an innovative newsroom. A good example of that is this Twitter map of the Superbowl. The location of the tweets during the match showed very interesting. And now, these kind of solutions with Twitter can be found on Trendmaps, a trendtopics visualizator for this microblogging service.

Infographics news: Visualizing crowdsourcing: Trendsmap

We all know nytimes.com is an innovative newsroom. A good example of that is this Twitter map of the Superbowl. The location of the tweets during the match showed very interesting. And now, these kind of solutions with Twitter can be found on Trendmaps, a trendtopics visualizator for this microblogging service.

Cool Infographics: reMap: An Amazing Visual Browsing Interface to VisualCompexity.com
Bestario has created reMap, an interactive portal to view all of the infographics posted on VisualComplexity.com, and it’s amazing. They’ve created semantic connection between the different infographics using tags tat allow for an incredible browsing experience. An interactive, visual browsing interface to an infographic archive.

Cool Infographics: reMap: An Amazing Visual Browsing Interface to VisualCompexity.com

Bestario has created reMap, an interactive portal to view all of the infographics posted on VisualComplexity.com, and it’s amazing. They’ve created semantic connection between the different infographics using tags tat allow for an incredible browsing experience. An interactive, visual browsing interface to an infographic archive.