A look at social business in 2013

CIO’s will rise to the forefront of corporate influence; data ownership will be ever important… Rob Howard of Telligent reveals his predictions for a year of social business.

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In 2012, social business resounded throughout the business land as companies were beginning to realise the potential of going social. However, 2013 is the year when companies will invest more heavily in social business, and will have to take into consideration the implications of coping with big data. Various factors will impact the workplace and bring the role of the CIO to the forefront of corporate influence.

Rob Howard, founder and CTO of social enterprise and community software company Telligent, shares his predictions for 2013 in social business: 

1. Businesses will continue to shift investments from Facebook and back to on-domain communities:

In 2013, businesses that previously shifted marketing funds away from their traditional dot-com domain towards Facebook, will reverse that trend. Research from Forrester Research Inc. and other analyst firms continue to validate the need for organisations to invest in their own websites and community experiences. Why? Consumers have different expectations and behaviours in consumer social media and branded communities.

ReadWrite – Ubislate 7Ci: Can This $20 Tablet Really Change The World?
In all the competitive battles that have defined the history of the technology revolution, one essential truth almost always determines the outcome: cheap and good enough beats awesome but expensive every time.
It happened when PCs beat out minicomputers (not to mention Macintosh’s). It happened when VHS killed Betamax. It happened when Linux pushed aside proprietary server operating systems. It’s happening now as Google’s Android overtakes Apple’s iOS.
Good Enough?
And it could be about to happen again with the Ubislate 7Ci tablet. This Android device is far from special in just about every respect. The specs are ordinary at best:
7-inch, 800 x 432 capacitive touchscreen
Android 4.04 Ice Cream Sandwich
1GHz Cortex A8 ARMv7 CPU
512MB RAM, 4GB storage
Wi-Fi (a version with GPRS cellular capability is also available)
VGA front-facing camera
Micro SD slot
Power, micro-USB, and headphone connectors
The speaker is tinny. The pictures are grainy and low-res, and the colors are off, too. The screen has to be held just so to be seen properly. Battery life is listed as a measly 3 hours, and in my tests the device couldn’t hold a charge more than a day or two no matter how little it was used. Performance is painfully slow for anyone spoiled by the latest tablets from Apple, Samsung, Microsoft and others. Things that should happen instantly take several seconds or more, and I experienced frequent hangups and glitches. 
But build quality seems solid, and the thing is perfectly portable. Most important, though, it works - and it’s being sold for just $20 in India.

ReadWrite – Ubislate 7Ci: Can This $20 Tablet Really Change The World?

In all the competitive battles that have defined the history of the technology revolution, one essential truth almost always determines the outcome: cheap and good enough beats awesome but expensive every time.

It happened when PCs beat out minicomputers (not to mention Macintosh’s). It happened when VHS killed Betamax. It happened when Linux pushed aside proprietary server operating systems. It’s happening now as Google’s Android overtakes Apple’s iOS.

Good Enough?

And it could be about to happen again with the Ubislate 7Ci tablet. This Android device is far from special in just about every respect. The specs are ordinary at best:

  • 7-inch, 800 x 432 capacitive touchscreen
  • Android 4.04 Ice Cream Sandwich
  • 1GHz Cortex A8 ARMv7 CPU
  • 512MB RAM, 4GB storage
  • Wi-Fi (a version with GPRS cellular capability is also available)
  • VGA front-facing camera
  • Micro SD slot
  • Power, micro-USB, and headphone connectors

The speaker is tinny. The pictures are grainy and low-res, and the colors are off, too. The screen has to be held just so to be seen properly. Battery life is listed as a measly 3 hours, and in my tests the device couldn’t hold a charge more than a day or two no matter how little it was used. Performance is painfully slow for anyone spoiled by the latest tablets from Apple, Samsung, Microsoft and others. Things that should happen instantly take several seconds or more, and I experienced frequent hangups and glitches. 

But build quality seems solid, and the thing is perfectly portable. Most important, though, it works - and it’s being sold for just $20 in India.

89-Year-Old Man Develops Bladeless Bird-Friendly Wind Turbine
Wind turbines transform moving air currents into clean energy; there isn’t much to hate about that, especially when compared to the toxic emissions and high cost of fossil fuels. But wildlife conservation organizations have often expressed concerns that wind farms pose a threat to flying species bird and bat species. Eighty-nine-year-old military veteran Raymond Green decided that there’s no reason why clean energy and birds can’t coexist, so he designed the Catching Wind Power device, a bladeless wind turbine that promises to harness wind energy without harming our feathered friends.

89-Year-Old Man Develops Bladeless Bird-Friendly Wind Turbine

Wind turbines transform moving air currents into clean energy; there isn’t much to hate about that, especially when compared to the toxic emissions and high cost of fossil fuels. But wildlife conservation organizations have often expressed concerns that wind farms pose a threat to flying species bird and bat species. Eighty-nine-year-old military veteran Raymond Green decided that there’s no reason why clean energy and birds can’t coexist, so he designed the Catching Wind Power device, a bladeless wind turbine that promises to harness wind energy without harming our feathered friends.


(via studio630)

Airbnb For Workspaces Allows Mobile Creatives To Connect & Collaborate
“This goes beyond renting a desk, it’s all about creating and engaging a community of like-minded professionals, I like to think of it as a physical professional network. It creates this serendipitous opportunity for other people who want to connect and join a community, not just a desk.”

Airbnb For Workspaces Allows Mobile Creatives To Connect & Collaborate

“This goes beyond renting a desk, it’s all about creating and engaging a community of like-minded professionals, I like to think of it as a physical professional network. It creates this serendipitous opportunity for other people who want to connect and join a community, not just a desk.”

(via good)

To Turn The Crowd Into Venture Capitalists, FundersClub Raises $6M Seed Round — Biggest In YC History
For those unfamiliar, FundersClub is a website that picks promising startups and lets people invest in them over the web in return for real equity. Anyone who’s an “accredited investor” (earns over $200,000 a year or has a net worth over $1 million) can browse startups with open rounds ranging from a few hundred thousand to a few million dollars. They learn about the businesses, pick ones they believe in, and plop down as little a $1,000. The average investment so far is $2500. All the legal paperwork and money transfer happens right there online.

Full Story: TechCrunch

To Turn The Crowd Into Venture Capitalists, FundersClub Raises $6M Seed Round — Biggest In YC History

For those unfamiliar, FundersClub is a website that picks promising startups and lets people invest in them over the web in return for real equity. Anyone who’s an “accredited investor” (earns over $200,000 a year or has a net worth over $1 million) can browse startups with open rounds ranging from a few hundred thousand to a few million dollars. They learn about the businesses, pick ones they believe in, and plop down as little a $1,000. The average investment so far is $2500. All the legal paperwork and money transfer happens right there online.


Full Story: TechCrunch

Plug-In Kit Turns Any Car Into A Hybrid For $3000 - PSFK
Students from the Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) have developed a plug-in hybrid retrofit kit. The eco-friendly kit is said to work with almost any car to turn it into a hybrid vehicle. The best part is, the cost of the technology would cost around $3,000 if it’s commercialized.
Professor Charles Perry from MTSU recently fitted the hub technology on a 1995 Honda station wagon, and helped the vehicle increase its gas mileage by 50 to 100 percent. Perry commented that, “The whole point was to demonstrate the feasibility of adding the electrical motor to the rear wheel of the car without changing the brakes, bearings, suspension — anything mechanical.”
Watch the video below to see how the Plug-In Hybrid Retrofit Kit is fitted and how it works:

via PSFK: http://www.psfk.com/2012/08/diy-hybrid-car-kit.html#ixzz22Ug50Hu8

Plug-In Kit Turns Any Car Into A Hybrid For $3000 - PSFK

Students from the Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) have developed a plug-in hybrid retrofit kit. The eco-friendly kit is said to work with almost any car to turn it into a hybrid vehicle. The best part is, the cost of the technology would cost around $3,000 if it’s commercialized.

Professor Charles Perry from MTSU recently fitted the hub technology on a 1995 Honda station wagon, and helped the vehicle increase its gas mileage by 50 to 100 percent. Perry commented that, “The whole point was to demonstrate the feasibility of adding the electrical motor to the rear wheel of the car without changing the brakes, bearings, suspension — anything mechanical.”

Watch the video below to see how the Plug-In Hybrid Retrofit Kit is fitted and how it works:



via PSFK: http://www.psfk.com/2012/08/diy-hybrid-car-kit.html#ixzz22Ug50Hu8

Who invented the Internet?: The outrageous conservative claim that every tech innovation came from private enterprise. - Slate Magazine


Earlier this month, President Obama argued that wealthy business people owe some of their success to the government’s investment in education and basic infrastructure. He cited roads, bridges, and schools. Then he singled out the most clear-cut example of how government investment can spark huge business opportunities: the Internet.




“The Internet didn’t get invented on its own,” Obama said. “Government research created the Internet so that all the companies could make money off the Internet.”




Until recently this wouldn’t have been a controversial statement. Everyone in the tech world knows that the Internet got its start in the 1960s, when a team of computing pioneers at the Pentagon’s Advanced Research Projects Agency designed and deployed ARPANET, the first computer network that used “packet switching”—a communications system that splits up data and sends it across multiple paths toward its destination, which is the basic design of today’s Internet. According to most accounts, researchers working on ARPANET created many of the Internet’s defining features, including TCP/IP, the protocol on which today’s network operates. In the 1980s, they strung together various government and university networks together using TCP/IP—thus creating a single worldwide network, the Internet.



Suddenly, though, the government’s role in the Internet’s creation is being cast into doubt. “It’s an urban legend that the government launched the Internet,” Gordon Crovitz, the former publisher of the Wall Street Journal,argued Monday in a widely linkedJournal op-ed. Instead, Crovitz believes that “full credit” for the Internet’s creation ought to go to Xerox, whose Silicon Valley research facility, Xerox PARC, created the Ethernet networking standard as well as the first graphical computer (famously the inspiration for Apple’s Mac). According to Crovitz, not only did the government not create the Internet, it slowed its arrival—that researchers were hassled by “bureaucrats” who stymied the network’s success.




“It’s important to understand the history of the Internet because it’s too often wrongly cited to justify big government,” Crovitz says. I’ll give him one thing: It is important to understand the history of the Internet. Too bad he doesn’t seem interested in doing so.




Crovitz’s entire yarn is almost hysterically false. He gets basic history wrong, he gets the Internet’s defining technologies wrong, and, most importantly, he misses the important interplay between public and private funds that has been necessary for all great modern technological advances.

Who invented the Internet?: The outrageous conservative claim that every tech innovation came from private enterprise. - Slate Magazine

Earlier this month, President Obama argued that wealthy business people owe some of their success to the government’s investment in education and basic infrastructure. He cited roads, bridges, and schools. Then he singled out the most clear-cut example of how government investment can spark huge business opportunities: the Internet.

“The Internet didn’t get invented on its own,” Obama said. “Government research created the Internet so that all the companies could make money off the Internet.”

Until recently this wouldn’t have been a controversial statement. Everyone in the tech world knows that the Internet got its start in the 1960s, when a team of computing pioneers at the Pentagon’s Advanced Research Projects Agency designed and deployed ARPANET, the first computer network that used “packet switching”—a communications system that splits up data and sends it across multiple paths toward its destination, which is the basic design of today’s Internet. According to most accounts, researchers working on ARPANET created many of the Internet’s defining features, including TCP/IP, the protocol on which today’s network operates. In the 1980s, they strung together various government and university networks together using TCP/IP—thus creating a single worldwide network, the Internet.

Suddenly, though, the government’s role in the Internet’s creation is being cast into doubt. “It’s an urban legend that the government launched the Internet,” Gordon Crovitz, the former publisher of the Wall Street Journal,argued Monday in a widely linkedJournal op-ed. Instead, Crovitz believes that “full credit” for the Internet’s creation ought to go to Xerox, whose Silicon Valley research facility, Xerox PARC, created the Ethernet networking standard as well as the first graphical computer (famously the inspiration for Apple’s Mac). According to Crovitz, not only did the government not create the Internet, it slowed its arrival—that researchers were hassled by “bureaucrats” who stymied the network’s success.

“It’s important to understand the history of the Internet because it’s too often wrongly cited to justify big government,” Crovitz says. I’ll give him one thing: It is important to understand the history of the Internet. Too bad he doesn’t seem interested in doing so.

Crovitz’s entire yarn is almost hysterically false. He gets basic history wrong, he gets the Internet’s defining technologies wrong, and, most importantly, he misses the important interplay between public and private funds that has been necessary for all great modern technological advances.

The Art of Non-Conformity » How to Do Big Things
If you want to change the world, follow a dream, or otherwise find your own identity, you need to be able to do big things. In addition to being a prerequisite for growth, doing big things is also a lot of fun. But how do you do them? What steps do you take? Thankfully, much of the work required to do big things relates to the mindset of deciding to do them. With that in mind, consider these suggestions for your own pursuit of meaning and adventure. Do not model your definition of big things on what other people have done. This is why your big things are YOUR big things. If something matters to you, that’s all that matters. Decide for yourself: a) what the big things are, and b) how you’ll determine the success or act of accomplishing the big things. You decide. You be the judge. 

The Art of Non-Conformity » How to Do Big Things

If you want to change the world, follow a dream, or otherwise find your own identity, you need to be able to do big things. In addition to being a prerequisite for growth, doing big things is also a lot of fun. But how do you do them? What steps do you take? Thankfully, much of the work required to do big things relates to the mindset of deciding to do them. With that in mind, consider these suggestions for your own pursuit of meaning and adventure. Do not model your definition of big things on what other people have done. This is why your big things are YOUR big things. If something matters to you, that’s all that matters. Decide for yourself: a) what the big things are, and b) how you’ll determine the success or act of accomplishing the big things. You decide. You be the judge.