Kinect Installation Lets Visitors Control A Living Human Cell [Video] - PSFK
Living Cell is an interactive installation created by design agency Clever Franke for the research group Eriba Institute.
The data visualisation work allows you to physically step inside a cell, walk around its organelles and influence its processes. Visitors can discover information about specific parts of the cell by walking into the cell and touching the part of interest. The lifetime of the cell is approximately an hour; if there is no interference from the visitors eventually the cell will die and be born again.

Kinect Installation Lets Visitors Control A Living Human Cell [Video] - PSFK

Living Cell is an interactive installation created by design agency Clever Franke for the research group Eriba Institute.

The data visualisation work allows you to physically step inside a cell, walk around its organelles and influence its processes. Visitors can discover information about specific parts of the cell by walking into the cell and touching the part of interest. The lifetime of the cell is approximately an hour; if there is no interference from the visitors eventually the cell will die and be born again.

Turning a standard LCD monitor into touchscreen with a $5 wall-mounted sensor | ExtremeTech
Researchers at the University of Washington’s aptly named Ubiquitous Computing Lab can turn any LCD monitor in your hous into a touchscreen, with nothing more than a $5 sensor that plugs into the wall and some clever software.
The technology, called uTouch, works by measuring the electromagnetic interference (EMI) caused by your hand when it moves near or touches an LCD monitor. This might sound a little bit crazy, but I’ll explain. Basically, the electricity running through the wires in your house has a unique electromagnetic signature. There is the “carrier wave,” provided by the power company and your nearby substation, and then every single kink and switch along the way modulates the EM signature until it is quite unique. What most people don’t realize, though, is that every device that is plugged into a wall outlet also changes your EM signature. Your TV doesn’t just suck power from your house — it’s a two-way street, with the electronic components in the TV producing interference that change your house’s EM signature.

Turning a standard LCD monitor into touchscreen with a $5 wall-mounted sensor | ExtremeTech

Researchers at the University of Washington’s aptly named Ubiquitous Computing Lab can turn any LCD monitor in your hous into a touchscreen, with nothing more than a $5 sensor that plugs into the wall and some clever software.

The technology, called uTouch, works by measuring the electromagnetic interference (EMI) caused by your hand when it moves near or touches an LCD monitor. This might sound a little bit crazy, but I’ll explain. Basically, the electricity running through the wires in your house has a unique electromagnetic signature. There is the “carrier wave,” provided by the power company and your nearby substation, and then every single kink and switch along the way modulates the EM signature until it is quite unique. What most people don’t realize, though, is that every device that is plugged into a wall outlet also changes your EM signature. Your TV doesn’t just suck power from your house — it’s a two-way street, with the electronic components in the TV producing interference that change your house’s EM signature.

Samsung and the University of Texas conspire for thought controlled tablets - SlashGear
Electronics giant Samsung is working with researchers at the University of Texas on a project that has to do with providing control of a tablet using brain waves.
Electronics giant Samsung is working with researchers at the University of Texas on a project that has to do with providing control of a tablet using brain waves.

Samsung and the University of Texas conspire for thought controlled tablets - SlashGear

Electronics giant Samsung is working with researchers at the University of Texas on a project that has to do with providing control of a tablet using brain waves.


Electronics giant Samsung is working with researchers at the University of Texas on a project that has to do with providing control of a tablet using brain waves.

Flutter Is Like Kinect For Your Computer’s Webcam
Kinect may not be the best way to play games on an Xbox 360, in spite of the fact that some games for the platform are pretty good. However, one place Kinect does shine is in controlling the Xbox interface. It features all kinds of cool gestures that make it easy to control the console without touching the controller. Wouldn’t it be awesome if you could get functionality like that on your Mac? With Flutter it’s actually possible, and it’s easier than you might think to get it up and running.
Of course, Flutter is not as deep as Kinect, as it lacks the hardware and depth sensing technologies. However, it’s a very useful tool for listening to music and watching videos, as it allows you to skip songs, rewind, fast forward, play, and pause – all with simple gestures. Instead of digging through open windows to find and pause music, you can simply perform a gesture, and save yourself some valuable time. Plus, it feels really cool stopping music with a gesture, like something out of a sci-fi movie.

Flutter Is Like Kinect For Your Computer’s Webcam

Kinect may not be the best way to play games on an Xbox 360, in spite of the fact that some games for the platform are pretty good. However, one place Kinect does shine is in controlling the Xbox interface. It features all kinds of cool gestures that make it easy to control the console without touching the controller. Wouldn’t it be awesome if you could get functionality like that on your Mac? With Flutter it’s actually possible, and it’s easier than you might think to get it up and running.

Of course, Flutter is not as deep as Kinect, as it lacks the hardware and depth sensing technologies. However, it’s a very useful tool for listening to music and watching videos, as it allows you to skip songs, rewind, fast forward, play, and pause – all with simple gestures. Instead of digging through open windows to find and pause music, you can simply perform a gesture, and save yourself some valuable time. Plus, it feels really cool stopping music with a gesture, like something out of a sci-fi movie.

Panasonic 2013 Smart TVs wield Nuance Dragon TV for voice control, text-to-speech
Panasonic and Nuance have been close partners on TV voice recognition in the past; we now know that they’re getting a bit cozier for Panasonic’s 2013 Smart TVs. The company’s newer LCDs and plasmas with voice recognition use Nuance’s Dragon TV for voice-only control of basics like volume as well as content and web searches. The engine will also speak out content and menus if you need more than just visual confirmation of where you’re going. Panasonic’s refreshed TV line is gradually rolling out over the spring, so those who see a plastic remote control as so very 2010 won’t have long to wait.

Panasonic 2013 Smart TVs wield Nuance Dragon TV for voice control, text-to-speech

Panasonic and Nuance have been close partners on TV voice recognition in the past; we now know that they’re getting a bit cozier for Panasonic’s 2013 Smart TVs. The company’s newer LCDs and plasmas with voice recognition use Nuance’s Dragon TV for voice-only control of basics like volume as well as content and web searches. The engine will also speak out content and menus if you need more than just visual confirmation of where you’re going. Panasonic’s refreshed TV line is gradually rolling out over the spring, so those who see a plastic remote control as so very 2010 won’t have long to wait.

 Microchip Markets RFID Technology that Transmits via the Human Body - RFID Journal
Several companies are currently beta-testing a radio frequency identification system from Microchip Technology that uses the human body as a conduit for transmissions between an interrogator and a tag. Microchip’s platform, known as BodyCom, can be utilized to control access to a building, or to control the usage of a device, such as a computer or a weapon. The companies, located in various parts of the world, are testing ways in which to integrate the technology into their own solutions, such as keyless vehicle-entry systems.
While traditional RFID systems transmit data through the air, simply requiring a tag or a receiving unit to come within transmission range of an interrogator, the BodyCom solution requires that both tag and interrogator be within close proximity to a person’s body. By leveraging the body to transmit a signal, BodyCom does not need as much power, nor does it require a conventional RFID reader antenna, according to Edward Dias, the embedded-security business-development manager of Microchip’s MCU8 (8-bit microcontroller) division. This would mean the battery life of a device such as a remote control or an ID tag would be longer, he explains, and that the transmission itself would be more secure, since there would be no over-the-air RF signals that could be intercepted.

 Microchip Markets RFID Technology that Transmits via the Human Body - RFID Journal

Several companies are currently beta-testing a radio frequency identification system from Microchip Technology that uses the human body as a conduit for transmissions between an interrogator and a tag. Microchip’s platform, known as BodyCom, can be utilized to control access to a building, or to control the usage of a device, such as a computer or a weapon. The companies, located in various parts of the world, are testing ways in which to integrate the technology into their own solutions, such as keyless vehicle-entry systems.

While traditional RFID systems transmit data through the air, simply requiring a tag or a receiving unit to come within transmission range of an interrogator, the BodyCom solution requires that both tag and interrogator be within close proximity to a person’s body. By leveraging the body to transmit a signal, BodyCom does not need as much power, nor does it require a conventional RFID reader antenna, according to Edward Dias, the embedded-security business-development manager of Microchip’s MCU8 (8-bit microcontroller) division. This would mean the battery life of a device such as a remote control or an ID tag would be longer, he explains, and that the transmission itself would be more secure, since there would be no over-the-air RF signals that could be intercepted.

Video: Next-gen Kinect sensor.

The sensor inside Kinect was created by PrimeSense, who demonstrate the next generation model called Capri in this video.

Capri is 1/10 the size of previous models, and the company says “we have been able to improve on all aspects of the system” in the device, which can be integrated into tablets and smartphones.

Microsoft is actually only one customer using the system, and does not licence it exclusively. Other companies also using the technology include iRobot, Matterport, and Asus

(via 8bitfuture)

Founders of Leap Motion: Our Amazing 3D Tracking Will Be Everywhere | Singularity Hub
In the past few weeks the Leap Motion device has sent shudders of delight through gadget lovers and computer designers alike by promising a new kind of ultra-accurate, and very cheap, optical 3D tracking for your desktop or laptop computer. Forget the Kinect, Leap Motion is cheaper ($70), more precise (down to 0.01 mm), and much smaller (think “pack of gum” proportions). The incredible demo for the Leap Motion (see below) shows how the desktop device can quickly detect hand motion so that a user needs merely wiggle their fingers in front of their computer to intuitively control what happens on the screen. Currently taking pre-orders, the Leap Motion is scheduled to ship between December and February, and with it will come a new market of third party apps designed to take full advantage of the device. I had a chance to sit down with CEO Michael Buckwald and CTO David Holtz and test out the Leap Motion first hand. If things go their way, the Leap Motion will become the “third input device” for computers, joining the keyboard and mouse in a new triumvirate of digital control.  

Founders of Leap Motion: Our Amazing 3D Tracking Will Be Everywhere | Singularity Hub

In the past few weeks the Leap Motion device has sent shudders of delight through gadget lovers and computer designers alike by promising a new kind of ultra-accurate, and very cheap, optical 3D tracking for your desktop or laptop computer. Forget the Kinect, Leap Motion is cheaper ($70), more precise (down to 0.01 mm), and much smaller (think “pack of gum” proportions). The incredible demo for the Leap Motion (see below) shows how the desktop device can quickly detect hand motion so that a user needs merely wiggle their fingers in front of their computer to intuitively control what happens on the screen. Currently taking pre-orders, the Leap Motion is scheduled to ship between December and February, and with it will come a new market of third party apps designed to take full advantage of the device. I had a chance to sit down with CEO Michael Buckwald and CTO David Holtz and test out the Leap Motion first hand. If things go their way, the Leap Motion will become the “third input device” for computers, joining the keyboard and mouse in a new triumvirate of digital control.  

I have recently done a number of interviews on the implications of Apple’s voice assistant Siri. To me, it’s looking very much like Apple has once again brought a technology to market precisely when it is sufficiently mature to impress. Voice control and ‘intelligent assistants’ are far from new, but haven’t been widely used to date simply because they haven’t been good enough.

'Thought-Pad' Displays Could Replace Touchpads - Smarter Strategies
If you’re like most professionals, recent advances in touchpad screens are saving you time. On your smartphone or tablet PC, you can quickly switch between applications, check e-mail and surf the Web—all with just the touch of a finger. Now imagine how fast your computing could be if you could do all of these tasks simply by thinking about them. A research project at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has shown that such “thought-pad” computing may soon be achievable. 

'Thought-Pad' Displays Could Replace Touchpads - Smarter Strategies

If you’re like most professionals, recent advances in touchpad screens are saving you time. On your smartphone or tablet PC, you can quickly switch between applications, check e-mail and surf the Web—all with just the touch of a finger. Now imagine how fast your computing could be if you could do all of these tasks simply by thinking about them. A research project at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has shown that such “thought-pad” computing may soon be achievable.