emergentfutures:

One Trillion Sensors Embedded in Humans and Machines by 2020


According to scientists, humanity has begun its next major shift: we are now entering the “Hybrid Age”. Across the entire range of scientific and technological disciplines changes are occurring that were unimaginable a few decades ago.
 
 
Full Story: IndustryTap

emergentfutures:

One Trillion Sensors Embedded in Humans and Machines by 2020

According to scientists, humanity has begun its next major shift: we are now entering the “Hybrid Age”. Across the entire range of scientific and technological disciplines changes are occurring that were unimaginable a few decades ago.

 

 

Full Story: IndustryTap

(via futurescope)

Defibrillator Equipped Drones Speed Treatment To Those In Need - PSFK
When someone is having a cardiac arrhythmia, getting an automatic external defibrillator (AED) to that person as quickly as possible can often be the difference between life and death. The problem is that AEDs are usually only readily available in high pedestrian traffic areas such as airports or sports stadiums, due to the cost of each device. In less populated areas, it can sometimes take hours for the necessary equipment to arrive. Imagine if there was a quick and easy way to get the lifesaving tools to someone in need, faster than any ambulance or EMT.
The Defikopter is a drone that can deliver a defibrillator to heart attack victims much quicker than emergency responders. Conceived by Germany-based nonprofit Definetz, the system can carry an AED to any location based on its GPS coordinates. Although the system is still in the early stages of development, the team are developing a smartphone app that those with heart problems, or their family, can download and have on hand in case of emergency.

Defibrillator Equipped Drones Speed Treatment To Those In Need - PSFK

When someone is having a cardiac arrhythmia, getting an automatic external defibrillator (AED) to that person as quickly as possible can often be the difference between life and death. The problem is that AEDs are usually only readily available in high pedestrian traffic areas such as airports or sports stadiums, due to the cost of each device. In less populated areas, it can sometimes take hours for the necessary equipment to arrive. Imagine if there was a quick and easy way to get the lifesaving tools to someone in need, faster than any ambulance or EMT.

The Defikopter is a drone that can deliver a defibrillator to heart attack victims much quicker than emergency responders. Conceived by Germany-based nonprofit Definetz, the system can carry an AED to any location based on its GPS coordinates. Although the system is still in the early stages of development, the team are developing a smartphone app that those with heart problems, or their family, can download and have on hand in case of emergency.

Beyond Online Classes: How The Internet of Everything Is Transforming Education
Over the next few weeks, students will be heading back to school for the fall semester. In fact, my oldest child will be starting college for the first time, and I have another one not far behind. So naturally, I’ve been thinking about the future of education, and the opportunities and challenges 21st century technology might bring.
Technology has had an amazing impact on education in the last few years. But what we’ve seen so far is nothing compared to the sea change that will be created by the Internet of Everything (IoE) in the coming decade. The networked connections among people, processes, data and things will change not just how and where education is delivered, but will also redefine what students need to learn, and why.

Beyond Online Classes: How The Internet of Everything Is Transforming Education

Over the next few weeks, students will be heading back to school for the fall semester. In fact, my oldest child will be starting college for the first time, and I have another one not far behind. So naturally, I’ve been thinking about the future of education, and the opportunities and challenges 21st century technology might bring.

Technology has had an amazing impact on education in the last few years. But what we’ve seen so far is nothing compared to the sea change that will be created by the Internet of Everything (IoE) in the coming decade. The networked connections among people, processes, data and things will change not just how and where education is delivered, but will also redefine what students need to learn, and why.

High-tech parking meters detect vehicles and charge accordingly
Parking in the city can be a nightmare, which is why startups such as ParkTag have aimed to use crowdsourced data to let drivers know when a space becomes free near them. Now KERBspace is using tech to help parking meter operators to make the ticketing process more seamless. READ MORE…

High-tech parking meters detect vehicles and charge accordingly

Parking in the city can be a nightmare, which is why startups such as ParkTag have aimed to use crowdsourced data to let drivers know when a space becomes free near them. Now KERBspace is using tech to help parking meter operators to make the ticketing process more seamless. READ MORE…

Garmin HUD projects directions onto your windshield | The Car Tech blog
Smartphones have pretty much taken over as the default navigation tool for many drivers. However, some locales (including our home state of California) have outright banned smartphone use in the  car: no windshield mounts, no dashboard cradles. So, how are you going to get your turn-by-turn directions when looking at your phone is illegal? Today, Garmin announced a new way to interact with its StreetPilot and Navigon smartphone navigation apps: the HUD.
HUD — short for head-up display — sits on the dashboard at the base of the windshield, where it projects navigation data upwards into the driver’s line of sight, either onto a transparent film affixed to the windshield glass or a reflector lens that attaches to the HUD device. Both the film and reflector lens are included with the device.
Garmin states that HUD will automatically adjust the brightness of its projections, so that the display remains visible in direct sunlight or at night. The device will be powered by a 12V charging cable with an integrated USB port for keeping your smartphone charged as well.

Garmin HUD projects directions onto your windshield | The Car Tech blog

Smartphones have pretty much taken over as the default navigation tool for many drivers. However, some locales (including our home state of California) have outright banned smartphone use in the car: no windshield mounts, no dashboard cradles. So, how are you going to get your turn-by-turn directions when looking at your phone is illegal? Today, Garmin announced a new way to interact with its StreetPilot and Navigon smartphone navigation apps: the HUD.

HUD — short for head-up display — sits on the dashboard at the base of the windshield, where it projects navigation data upwards into the driver’s line of sight, either onto a transparent film affixed to the windshield glass or a reflector lens that attaches to the HUD device. Both the film and reflector lens are included with the device.

Garmin states that HUD will automatically adjust the brightness of its projections, so that the display remains visible in direct sunlight or at night. The device will be powered by a 12V charging cable with an integrated USB port for keeping your smartphone charged as well.

Tour the World’s Webcams With the Search Engine for the Internet of Things | Wired Enterprise

When Dan Tentler wants to find something on the internet, he doesn’t use Google or Bing. Tentler, a freelance security consultant, is a road-less-traveled kind of guy. He likes to check out the internet’s alleyways and backroads. And for people like him him, there’s only one search engine. It’s called Shodan.
Google has done a masterful job of indexing the human experience — the webpages, books, Word documents, and images and videos that make up our life. But Shodan looks for something simpler. It’s looking for all the stuff that’s connected to the internet, from routers and refrigerators to live webcams that give you a glimpse inside people’s homes to, well, who knows what.
These odd little devices, overlooked by Google and Bing, are the things that Tentler finds interesting. Using Shodan, he’s taken a tour of a Scottish country house, explored a stationary GPS receiver in Alaska, and even examined the control panel for a swimming pool. “It’s like looking at a street or a set of the buildings, but not from the front,” he says. “Not from where their marketing department wants you to see it. But from where the shipping and receiving department uses it.”

Tour the World’s Webcams With the Search Engine for the Internet of Things | Wired Enterprise

When Dan Tentler wants to find something on the internet, he doesn’t use Google or Bing. Tentler, a freelance security consultant, is a road-less-traveled kind of guy. He likes to check out the internet’s alleyways and backroads. And for people like him him, there’s only one search engine. It’s called Shodan.

Google has done a masterful job of indexing the human experience — the webpages, books, Word documents, and images and videos that make up our life. But Shodan looks for something simpler. It’s looking for all the stuff that’s connected to the internet, from routers and refrigerators to live webcams that give you a glimpse inside people’s homes to, well, who knows what.

These odd little devices, overlooked by Google and Bing, are the things that Tentler finds interesting. Using Shodan, he’s taken a tour of a Scottish country house, explored a stationary GPS receiver in Alaska, and even examined the control panel for a swimming pool. “It’s like looking at a street or a set of the buildings, but not from the front,” he says. “Not from where their marketing department wants you to see it. But from where the shipping and receiving department uses it.”

springwise:

Monitor sends heart patients’ health data to doctors in real time
One way health professionals can keep track of their patients when they aren’t able to be in attendance is telepresence robots, such as the ones developed by InTouch Health. An alternative, however, is mobile monitoring. Created by Preventice, BodyGuardian RMS is a smartphone-based system that continuously tracks the health of those with heart conditions and sends the data straight to doctors. READ MORE…

springwise:

Monitor sends heart patients’ health data to doctors in real time

One way health professionals can keep track of their patients when they aren’t able to be in attendance is telepresence robots, such as the ones developed by InTouch Health. An alternative, however, is mobile monitoring. Created by Preventice, BodyGuardian RMS is a smartphone-based system that continuously tracks the health of those with heart conditions and sends the data straight to doctors. READ MORE…

inspirezme:

Memoto, known as the “life logging camera”, has gained publicity for taking self-documentation to the next level. There are many critiques of the system and the overall goal of documenting your whole life. However, I want to focus on the benefits when talking about this revolutionary idea. 

What if you could go back and remember the little moments in your day that made you smile, that inspired you, that just made you happy? Memoto creates a “life library”, allowing you to filter through your days and find images taken twice a minute. The divice is small, about the size of a watch, letting you to clip it on and then forget about it. It has a long battery life, lasting about two full days without a charge. Memoto began as yet another KickStarter success and is now available for pre-order. Are you ready for a photography memory?

(View video/article here)

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(via npr)

How you and I could become nodes in the internet of things
A group of French researchers believe that the sensors and transmitters we wear will route and relay data, not just collect it. We won’t just be connected to the network. We’ll be the network.

Ever wonder what the network infrastructure of the future will be? Try looking in the mirror.
Some day our bodies — or at least the clothing or accessories that adorn them — could become key network nodes in the internet of things. European researchers think that sensors and transmitters on our bodies can be used to form cooperative ad hoc networks that could be used for group indoor navigation, crowd-motion capture, health monitoring on a massive scale and especially collaborative communications. Last week, French institute CEA-Leti and three French universities have launched the Cormoran project, which aims to explore the use of such cooperative interpersonal networks.
The concept of wireless body area networks (WBANs) isn’t a new one. WBANs could be used to sever the cord between patients and their monitoring equipment. Companies like Apple and Heapslylon are exploring the possibility of connected clothes with embedded sensors. We’ve already begun embracing a new era of wearables, such as Google Glass to Fitbit (see disclosure), designed to become extensions of our senses and movements.

How you and I could become nodes in the internet of things

A group of French researchers believe that the sensors and transmitters we wear will route and relay data, not just collect it. We won’t just be connected to the network. We’ll be the network.

Ever wonder what the network infrastructure of the future will be? Try looking in the mirror.

Some day our bodies — or at least the clothing or accessories that adorn them — could become key network nodes in the internet of things. European researchers think that sensors and transmitters on our bodies can be used to form cooperative ad hoc networks that could be used for group indoor navigation, crowd-motion capture, health monitoring on a massive scale and especially collaborative communications. Last week, French institute CEA-Leti and three French universities have launched the Cormoran project, which aims to explore the use of such cooperative interpersonal networks.

fitbit oneThe concept of wireless body area networks (WBANs) isn’t a new one. WBANs could be used to sever the cord between patients and their monitoring equipment. Companies like Apple and Heapslylon are exploring the possibility of connected clothes with embedded sensors. We’ve already begun embracing a new era of wearables, such as Google Glass to Fitbit (see disclosure), designed to become extensions of our senses and movements.