The Internet of Things: What It Is, Why It Matters — GigaOM Pro

The “Internet of Things” (IoT) will likely be one of the most important technological advances of this century. The emergence of Cloud computing, meanwhile, has created the application and device management backbone needed to scale to and support billions of connected objects. Consumer, governmental and business trends are also pushing us toward the IoT. And despite inhibitors to growth, such as privacy issues and creating sustainable business models, we will see increasing benefits in our personal and community lives as the IoT takes hold.

 PhoneGap 1.0 Launches Today | ReadWriteWeb
PhoneGap, the open source mobile developement framework that allows mobile developers build apps using Web standards, is launching today into version 1.0. This is a milestone release for the platform, which now adds additional APIs, features and improvements in its newly updated product.

 PhoneGap 1.0 Launches Today | ReadWriteWeb

PhoneGap, the open source mobile developement framework that allows mobile developers build apps using Web standards, is launching today into version 1.0. This is a milestone release for the platform, which now adds additional APIs, features and improvements in its newly updated product.

From Floating Data to The Ground You Stand On: Creating an Internet of Places
The World Wide Web was originally created as a web of connected documents. What if that’s no longer an appropriate, or sufficient, metaphor? A group of geospatial data specialists today published a call for a new web architecture that would supplant the Internet of Documents with a spatio-temporal Internet of Places.
Published on the geotechnology industry site Directions Magazine, the call to action is titled The “Internet of Places” and was authored by Giuseppe Conti, Raffaele De Amicis, Federico Prandi (of Israeli CAD software company Graphitech) and Paul Watson of 30+ year old UK-based data quality and integration services company 1Spatial. The authors say that the old “publication-search-retrieval‟ paradigm has been carried through the Web 2.0 era of social media but the web now needs to be updated in order to take into account the connection between online content and geographic location.
"A significant proportion of the content available on the Internet has a spatial dimension," the authors argue.
"This may be either explicit or implicit, for instance a place name within a document or the location of a place referred to within a tweet. However, if we take a look from a geospatial standpoint at the various types of Internet resources and applications used today, we see a fairly fragmented picture…An increasing number of real-time sensor data feeds and an unprecedented amount of unstructured crowdsourced information now complements standard geospatial resources…
Source: ReadWriteWeb

From Floating Data to The Ground You Stand On: Creating an Internet of Places

The World Wide Web was originally created as a web of connected documents. What if that’s no longer an appropriate, or sufficient, metaphor? A group of geospatial data specialists today published a call for a new web architecture that would supplant the Internet of Documents with a spatio-temporal Internet of Places.

Published on the geotechnology industry site Directions Magazine, the call to action is titled The “Internet of Places” and was authored by Giuseppe Conti, Raffaele De Amicis, Federico Prandi (of Israeli CAD software company Graphitech) and Paul Watson of 30+ year old UK-based data quality and integration services company 1Spatial. The authors say that the old “publication-search-retrieval‟ paradigm has been carried through the Web 2.0 era of social media but the web now needs to be updated in order to take into account the connection between online content and geographic location.

"A significant proportion of the content available on the Internet has a spatial dimension," the authors argue.

"This may be either explicit or implicit, for instance a place name within a document or the location of a place referred to within a tweet. However, if we take a look from a geospatial standpoint at the various types of Internet resources and applications used today, we see a fairly fragmented picture…An increasing number of real-time sensor data feeds and an unprecedented amount of unstructured crowdsourced information now complements standard geospatial resources…

Source: ReadWriteWeb

Citibank, Sony PlayStation, Lockheed Martin, Gmail—it seems every day a new company is hacked, but instead of talking about or removing a threat that could cripple our government, we’re obsessing over Weinergate.
When are we finally going to answer the wakeup call?

Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo Team Up to Advance Semantic Web - Technology Review
A push to add meaning to Web pages to aid search could also enable other kinds of intelligent web apps.
Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo have teamed up to encourage Web page  operators to make the meaning of their pages understandable to search  engines.
The move may finally encourage widespread use of technology that  makes online information as comprehensible to computers as it is to  humans. If the effort works, the result will be not only better search  results, but also a wave of other intelligent apps and services able to  understand online information almost as well as we do.
The three big Web companies launched the initiative, known as Schema.org,  last week. It defines an interconnected vocabulary of terms that can be  added to the HTML markup of a Web page to communicate the meaning of  concepts on the page. A location referred to in text could be defined as  a courthouse, which Schema.org understands as being a specific type of  government building. People and events can also be defined, as can  attributes like distance, mass, or duration. This data will allow search  engines to better understand how useful a page may be for a given  search query—for example, by making it clear that a page is about the  headquarters of the U.S. Department of Defense, not five-sided regular  shapes.
The move represents a major advance in a campaign initiated in 2001  by Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the Web, to enable software to  access the meaning of online content—a vision known as the “semantic  Web.” Although the technology to do so exists, progress has been slow  because there have been few reasons for Web page operators to add the  extra markup.

Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo Team Up to Advance Semantic Web - Technology Review

A push to add meaning to Web pages to aid search could also enable other kinds of intelligent web apps.

Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo have teamed up to encourage Web page operators to make the meaning of their pages understandable to search engines.

The move may finally encourage widespread use of technology that makes online information as comprehensible to computers as it is to humans. If the effort works, the result will be not only better search results, but also a wave of other intelligent apps and services able to understand online information almost as well as we do.

The three big Web companies launched the initiative, known as Schema.org, last week. It defines an interconnected vocabulary of terms that can be added to the HTML markup of a Web page to communicate the meaning of concepts on the page. A location referred to in text could be defined as a courthouse, which Schema.org understands as being a specific type of government building. People and events can also be defined, as can attributes like distance, mass, or duration. This data will allow search engines to better understand how useful a page may be for a given search query—for example, by making it clear that a page is about the headquarters of the U.S. Department of Defense, not five-sided regular shapes.

The move represents a major advance in a campaign initiated in 2001 by Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the Web, to enable software to access the meaning of online content—a vision known as the “semantic Web.” Although the technology to do so exists, progress has been slow because there have been few reasons for Web page operators to add the extra markup.

Cisco chief futurist: The Internet of Things is here

Shift to mobility is powering a change in the architecture of the Internet, Dave Evans says

When futurists talk about technology to come, it’s easy to start imagining tales spun by the likes of Issac Asimov and William Gibson (or whoever your favourite science-fiction author happens to be), and that’s the case with Cisco Systems‘ chief futurist. However, some of what Cisco’s futurist talks about regarding the Internet is already here. An evolution in the fundamentals of the Internet is happening right now, and it’s only going to continue.

Dave Evans, chief futurist and chief technologist for the Internet Business Solutions Group (IBSG) at Cisco, calls the current evolution that’s going on with the decades-old Internet the “Internet of Things.” According to Evans, the World Wide Web has arguably gone through four distinct changes in its nearly 20-year history, but the Internet has remained fundamentally the same since the early days. Technologies have changed, standards have come and gone, but the Internet really hasn’t evolved at its base level since the days when it wasn’t used outside of academia and government.

“My premise here today is we’re seeing the first true evolution of the Internet. Why is that? Partly we’re seeing shift in architectural models. The new Internet, if you will, is becoming more mobile than fixed,” Evans said.

What is the Internet of Things? At the core of this evolution of the Internet is the idea that the Internet becomes more sensory — more proactive and less reactive. It also takes into account that the world has hit a point where there are more devices connecting to the Internet than people doing so. As Evans put it, his home has 38 devices that require an always-on Internet connection, and he seen exponential growth in the amount of bandwidth and network traffic in his home in the last 20 years (growth that is only going to continue on a steep climb).

YouTube Users Upload 48 Hours of Video Every Minute Online Video News
Users upload about 2 days worth of video per minute, compared to some 24 hours of video per minute 14 months ago 
Users watch more than 3 billion videos every single day 
via courtenaybird:
Source: GigaOM

YouTube Users Upload 48 Hours of Video Every Minute Online Video News

  • Users upload about 2 days worth of video per minute, compared to some 24 hours of video per minute 14 months ago 
  • Users watch more than 3 billion videos every single day 

via courtenaybird:

Source: GigaOM

(via courtenaybird)

With M2M, the machines do all the talking - O’Reilly Radar
Machine-to-machine applications: what they are, what they do, and why they need their own networks.
The shift from transporting voice to delivering data has transformed  the business of mobile carriers, but there’s yet another upheaval on the  horizon: machine to machine communications (M2M).
In M2M, devices and sensors communicate with each other or a central  server rather than with human beings. Theses device often use an  embedded SIM card for communication over the mobile network.  Applications include automotive, smartgrid, healthcare and environmental  usages.
M2M traffic differs from human-generated voice and data traffic.  Mobile carriers are adapting by creating entirely new companies for M2M,  such as Telenor’s M2M carrier Telenor Connexion, and m2o city, Orange’s joint venture with water giant Veolia.  I talked to Göran Brandt, head of business development at Telenor  Connexion and Rodolphe Fruges, VP of M2M at Orange Business Services  about the future of mobile and M2M.

With M2M, the machines do all the talking - O’Reilly Radar

Machine-to-machine applications: what they are, what they do, and why they need their own networks.

The shift from transporting voice to delivering data has transformed the business of mobile carriers, but there’s yet another upheaval on the horizon: machine to machine communications (M2M).

In M2M, devices and sensors communicate with each other or a central server rather than with human beings. Theses device often use an embedded SIM card for communication over the mobile network. Applications include automotive, smartgrid, healthcare and environmental usages.

M2M traffic differs from human-generated voice and data traffic. Mobile carriers are adapting by creating entirely new companies for M2M, such as Telenor’s M2M carrier Telenor Connexion, and m2o city, Orange’s joint venture with water giant Veolia. I talked to Göran Brandt, head of business development at Telenor Connexion and Rodolphe Fruges, VP of M2M at Orange Business Services about the future of mobile and M2M.

Augmented Reality – Transitioning out of the old-fashioned “Legacy Internet”: Interview with Bruce Sterling | UgoTrade
As Bruce Sterling points out, Augmented Reality is “truly a child of the twenty-teens, a genuine digital native,” and one visible indication that: ..the Internet really could look like a “legacy.” The Legacy Internet as an old-fashioned, dusty, desk-based place best left to archivists and librarians, while the action is out on the streets (see the full interview below). 
Opening this post is a video of Ben Cerveny’s Planetary app, which “turns your music into a universe,” and enchants all who try it.  Planetary shot into #3 on the Top Ten Free ipad app list soon after its release.

Augmented Reality – Transitioning out of the old-fashioned “Legacy Internet”: Interview with Bruce Sterling | UgoTrade

As Bruce Sterling points out, Augmented Reality is “truly a child of the twenty-teens, a genuine digital native,” and one visible indication that: ..the Internet really could look like a “legacy.” The Legacy Internet as an old-fashioned, dusty, desk-based place best left to archivists and librarians, while the action is out on the streets (see the full interview below). 

Opening this post is a video of Ben Cerveny’s Planetary app, which “turns your music into a universe,” and enchants all who try it.  Planetary shot into #3 on the Top Ten Free ipad app list soon after its release.

Watson leader highlights list of eight new IBM Fellows |  CNET News
For months, IBM’s “Jeopardy” champion computer Watson has been a major  PR win for the company, and tonight, its lead developer was awarded Big  Blue’s highest technical honor.
At a ceremony in New York, CEO Samuel Palmisano celebrated Watson team  leader David Ferrucci and seven other employees as IBM’s newest Fellows.  The eight new Fellows join a group of just 209 previous winners, among  whom have been the creators of technologies such as DRAM, the scanning  tunneling microscope, Fortran, and relational databases.
And while the other seven 2011 winners include scientists and innovators  who have broken important new ground in a variety of fields, it is no  surprise that IBM put forth Ferrucci as the face of the group.
"It’s a great honor for me," Ferrucci told CNET in an interview today,  "and something that oddly enough, I’ve been inspired by since high  school."
Ferrucci, whose IBM Grand Challenge project, the Watson supercomputer, gained international notoriety in February by beating “Jeopardy” champions Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter in a head-to-head match-up, said that he’d found an ad about the IBM  Fellows program in one of his father’s magazines when he was a teenager  and had taped it to his wall. Where most high school-age boys dream of  being the hero in the World Series, Ferrucci seems to have been inspired  by dreams of incredible technological successes.
According to an IBM release, the other 2011 Fellows included:
• Bob Blainey, who for “more than two decades…has focused on ensuring  not only that software can exploit hardware capabilities optimally, but  also that hardware designs evolve to support higher-performing  software.”
• Bradford Brooks, who was recognized for “his sustained achievement and  leadership regarding IBM’s involvement with complex materials that are  used in the electronics and information technology industries.”
• Nagui Halim, whose “technical vision and leadership launched the era of stream computing at IBM.”
• Steve Hunter, who “is a foremost industry expert in networking technologies and networking computing convergence.”
• Stefan Pappe, who leads IBM’s Specialty Service Area for Cloud  Services in the company’s global technology services delivery technology  and engineering group.
• Renato Recio, who is seen as a “world renowned technical expert in  data center networking server IO, network visualization, and related  architectures.”
• Wolfgang Roesner, who IBM calls “an expert in verification and [who]  has architected the verification tools and methodologies being used  across all IBM systems.”
Read more:

Watson leader highlights list of eight new IBM Fellows |  CNET News

For months, IBM’s “Jeopardy” champion computer Watson has been a major PR win for the company, and tonight, its lead developer was awarded Big Blue’s highest technical honor.

At a ceremony in New York, CEO Samuel Palmisano celebrated Watson team leader David Ferrucci and seven other employees as IBM’s newest Fellows. The eight new Fellows join a group of just 209 previous winners, among whom have been the creators of technologies such as DRAM, the scanning tunneling microscope, Fortran, and relational databases.

And while the other seven 2011 winners include scientists and innovators who have broken important new ground in a variety of fields, it is no surprise that IBM put forth Ferrucci as the face of the group.

"It’s a great honor for me," Ferrucci told CNET in an interview today, "and something that oddly enough, I’ve been inspired by since high school."

Ferrucci, whose IBM Grand Challenge project, the Watson supercomputer, gained international notoriety in February by beating “Jeopardy” champions Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter in a head-to-head match-up, said that he’d found an ad about the IBM Fellows program in one of his father’s magazines when he was a teenager and had taped it to his wall. Where most high school-age boys dream of being the hero in the World Series, Ferrucci seems to have been inspired by dreams of incredible technological successes.

According to an IBM release, the other 2011 Fellows included:

• Bob Blainey, who for “more than two decades…has focused on ensuring not only that software can exploit hardware capabilities optimally, but also that hardware designs evolve to support higher-performing software.”

• Bradford Brooks, who was recognized for “his sustained achievement and leadership regarding IBM’s involvement with complex materials that are used in the electronics and information technology industries.”

• Nagui Halim, whose “technical vision and leadership launched the era of stream computing at IBM.”

• Steve Hunter, who “is a foremost industry expert in networking technologies and networking computing convergence.”

• Stefan Pappe, who leads IBM’s Specialty Service Area for Cloud Services in the company’s global technology services delivery technology and engineering group.

• Renato Recio, who is seen as a “world renowned technical expert in data center networking server IO, network visualization, and related architectures.”

• Wolfgang Roesner, who IBM calls “an expert in verification and [who] has architected the verification tools and methodologies being used across all IBM systems.”


Read more:
 MIT project makes smarter mobile Wi-Fi
Your smartphone or tablet's  Wi-Fi radio lives in the moment. When it's time to connect to a hot  spot, all other things being equal, it will attach to the radio that's  the best for it at that instant: the one with the most attractive  combination of signal strength and throughput. But once your device is  on the move, that strategy is far from optimal.
A group at MIT is developing technology that takes actual and predicted  device movement into account when connecting to hotspots, to increase  overall wireless performance on mobile devices. See PDF: Improving Wireless Network Performance Using Sensor Hints.
MIT professor Hari Balakrishnan explains that his team’s  software uses sensors on a device that are otherwise unused when a Wi-Fi  radio is looking for a connection: the GPS sensor and logs,  acceleration sensors, even the compass. From this information, the  device can tell not just where it is, but where it’s going, and it can  then attach to a hotspot that it should be able to stick with for a bit  longer than if it’s just picking one that’s good at the moment. Devices  can also proactively select and modify radio data rates based on  predicted movements.
Source: CNET

 MIT project makes smarter mobile Wi-Fi

Your smartphone or tablet's Wi-Fi radio lives in the moment. When it's time to connect to a hot spot, all other things being equal, it will attach to the radio that's the best for it at that instant: the one with the most attractive combination of signal strength and throughput. But once your device is on the move, that strategy is far from optimal.

A group at MIT is developing technology that takes actual and predicted device movement into account when connecting to hotspots, to increase overall wireless performance on mobile devices. See PDF: Improving Wireless Network Performance Using Sensor Hints.

MIT professor Hari Balakrishnan explains that his team’s software uses sensors on a device that are otherwise unused when a Wi-Fi radio is looking for a connection: the GPS sensor and logs, acceleration sensors, even the compass. From this information, the device can tell not just where it is, but where it’s going, and it can then attach to a hotspot that it should be able to stick with for a bit longer than if it’s just picking one that’s good at the moment. Devices can also proactively select and modify radio data rates based on predicted movements.

Source: CNET
IBM SmartCloud launch - storify.com
By GigaOm.com “IBM is finally offering a cloud that will compete with  those from Amazon Web Services, Rackspace and other major cloud  providers. Called the IBM SmartCloud, the new offering should be a  formidable foe, especially when it comes to attracting enterprise  customers.”

IBM SmartCloud launch - storify.com

By GigaOm.com “IBM is finally offering a cloud that will compete with those from Amazon Web Services, Rackspace and other major cloud providers. Called the IBM SmartCloud, the new offering should be a formidable foe, especially when it comes to attracting enterprise customers.”

A couple of weeks ago I went to New York City as a guest of IBM’s mainframe group for an analyst summit. You may think mainframes are long gone by now but if you use a bank, or book a flight, or use the Post Office, you’re using a mainframe. These systems continue to be the basis for a huge percentage of transactions worldwide. System z isn’t just about legacy though- 20% of new sales are to run Linux workloads.

 Cool Infographics | The Map of the Internet
The Map of the Internet is an ambitious project from Peer 1 Hosting that maps the network of  hosts and routing connections that are the foundation of the Internet.   Clicking on the image above takes you to the poster in an interactive zooming viewer so you  can see the details.  You can also read about the making of the poster  in this post on the Peer 1 Hosting blog.

It’s a layout of all the networks that are  interconnected to form the internet. Some are run by small and large  ISPs, university networks, and customer networks - such as Facebook and  Google. It’s visual representation of all those networks interconnecting  with one another, forming the internet as we know it. Based on the size  of the nodes and the thickness of the lines, it speaks to the size of  those particular providers and the connections. 
In technical speak, you’re looking at all the  autonomous systems that make up the internet. Each autonomous system is a  network operated by a single organization, and has routing connections  to some number of neighbouring autonomous systems. The image depicts a  graph of 19,869 autonomous system nodes, joined by 44,344 connections.  The sizing and layout of the autonomous systems is based on their  eigenvector centrality, which is a measure of how central to the network  each autonomous system is: an autonomous system is central if it is  connected to other autonomous systems that are central.

 Cool Infographics | The Map of the Internet

The Map of the Internet is an ambitious project from Peer 1 Hosting that maps the network of hosts and routing connections that are the foundation of the Internet.  Clicking on the image above takes you to the poster in an interactive zooming viewer so you can see the details.  You can also read about the making of the poster in this post on the Peer 1 Hosting blog.

It’s a layout of all the networks that are interconnected to form the internet. Some are run by small and large ISPs, university networks, and customer networks - such as Facebook and Google. It’s visual representation of all those networks interconnecting with one another, forming the internet as we know it. Based on the size of the nodes and the thickness of the lines, it speaks to the size of those particular providers and the connections. 

In technical speak, you’re looking at all the autonomous systems that make up the internet. Each autonomous system is a network operated by a single organization, and has routing connections to some number of neighbouring autonomous systems. The image depicts a graph of 19,869 autonomous system nodes, joined by 44,344 connections. The sizing and layout of the autonomous systems is based on their eigenvector centrality, which is a measure of how central to the network each autonomous system is: an autonomous system is central if it is connected to other autonomous systems that are central.