We Are All Born Scientists, Study Finds | Popular Science
Young kids think and learn about their surroundings much the way that scientists think and learn in advanced experiments, a new study says. They form hypotheses, test them, analyze their findings and learn from their actions and the actions of others — all in child’s play.
A growing body of evidence about this style of learning shows yet again that early childhood education is crucial — but it also shows making preschool more academic could actually be detrimental, according to scientists at the University of California, Berkeley.

We Are All Born Scientists, Study Finds | Popular Science

Young kids think and learn about their surroundings much the way that scientists think and learn in advanced experiments, a new study says. They form hypotheses, test them, analyze their findings and learn from their actions and the actions of others — all in child’s play.

A growing body of evidence about this style of learning shows yet again that early childhood education is crucial — but it also shows making preschool more academic could actually be detrimental, according to scientists at the University of California, Berkeley.

Apple Makes Push Into iPad Textbooks - WSJ.com
With More iPads in Classrooms, Education Push Would Help Fend Off Android-Device Competition
Apple Inc., expanding its ambitions in education, joined the race to sell  digital textbooks, hoping to get students to trade their book bag for an  iPad.
The electronics company unveiled a new version of its iBooks digital  book store that supports textbooks featuring quizzes, note-taking, study  cards and other features, like the ability to interact with a diagram  of an ant.
The service launched with a small number of high-school titles from McGraw-Hill Cos., Pearson PLC and others, with some from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt coming  shortly. Textbooks for courses such as algebra 1, environmental science  and biology will be available first, priced at $14.99 or less.

Apple Makes Push Into iPad Textbooks - WSJ.com

With More iPads in Classrooms, Education Push Would Help Fend Off Android-Device Competition

Apple Inc., expanding its ambitions in education, joined the race to sell digital textbooks, hoping to get students to trade their book bag for an iPad.

The electronics company unveiled a new version of its iBooks digital book store that supports textbooks featuring quizzes, note-taking, study cards and other features, like the ability to interact with a diagram of an ant.

The service launched with a small number of high-school titles from McGraw-Hill Cos., Pearson PLC and others, with some from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt coming shortly. Textbooks for courses such as algebra 1, environmental science and biology will be available first, priced at $14.99 or less.

Why Google Is The Most Important Learning Tool Ever Invented | Fast Company
Tom Vander Ark is an edu-futurist par excellence. He’s chair of the International Association for K-12 Online Learning, author of the new Getting Smart: How Personal Digital Learning is Changing the World, and an investor in startup technology and entrepreneurship school General Assembly (see this month’s Life in Beta) through his education-focused venture fund Learn Capital.  Here, he shares some of his views on the importance of “just-in-time  learning” and the “plummeting” value of traditional education.


And this is a general trend in education that you write about in Getting Smart, right? 

I think in general in the industry, the ability to deliver around that need will get much more sophisticated—to find out not only what people need to learn, but to get smarter about how they learn best. So we have a smart learner profile, a motivational profile not only what they need to learn but the best way for them to learn. 

Why Google Is The Most Important Learning Tool Ever Invented | Fast Company

Tom Vander Ark is an edu-futurist par excellence. He’s chair of the International Association for K-12 Online Learning, author of the new Getting Smart: How Personal Digital Learning is Changing the World, and an investor in startup technology and entrepreneurship school General Assembly (see this month’s Life in Beta) through his education-focused venture fund Learn Capital. Here, he shares some of his views on the importance of “just-in-time learning” and the “plummeting” value of traditional education.

And this is a general trend in education that you write about in Getting Smart, right?

I think in general in the industry, the ability to deliver around that need will get much more sophisticated—to find out not only what people need to learn, but to get smarter about how they learn best. So we have a smart learner profile, a motivational profile not only what they need to learn but the best way for them to learn. 

Clayton Christensen on disruption in online education | The Next Web
Earlier this year we discussed how the Internet is revolutionizing education and  featured several companies and organizations that are disrupting the  online education space including Open Yale, Open Culture, Khan  Academy, Academic Earth, P2PU, Skillshare, Scitable and Skype in the  Classroom. The Internet has changed how we interact with Time. We can be  learning all the time now, whenever we want, and wherever we want. And  because of that, we’re seeing explosive growth in online education.
In October, Knewton, an education technology startup, raised $33 million in its 4th round of funding to roll out its adaptive online learning platform. In early November, Khan Academy,  an online collection featuring over 2,100 educational videos ranging in  intensity from 1+1=2 to college level calculus and physics, snagged $5 million in funding to add two new faculty members that will create lectures for humanities and art-intensive classes.
According to the 2010 Sloan Survey of Online Learning,  approximately 5.6 million students took at least one web-based class  during the fall 2009 semester, which marked a 21% growth from the  previous year. The Harvard Business School Review points out that this figure is up from 45,000 in 2000 and experts predict that online education could reach 14 million in 2014.

Clayton Christensen on disruption in online education | The Next Web

Earlier this year we discussed how the Internet is revolutionizing education and featured several companies and organizations that are disrupting the online education space including Open Yale, Open Culture, Khan Academy, Academic Earth, P2PU, Skillshare, Scitable and Skype in the Classroom. The Internet has changed how we interact with Time. We can be learning all the time now, whenever we want, and wherever we want. And because of that, we’re seeing explosive growth in online education.

In October, Knewton, an education technology startup, raised $33 million in its 4th round of funding to roll out its adaptive online learning platform. In early November, Khan Academy, an online collection featuring over 2,100 educational videos ranging in intensity from 1+1=2 to college level calculus and physics, snagged $5 million in funding to add two new faculty members that will create lectures for humanities and art-intensive classes.

According to the 2010 Sloan Survey of Online Learning, approximately 5.6 million students took at least one web-based class during the fall 2009 semester, which marked a 21% growth from the previous year. The Harvard Business School Review points out that this figure is up from 45,000 in 2000 and experts predict that online education could reach 14 million in 2014.

7 Ways To Use The iPad To Help Students Excel At School | MakeUseOf
We are approaching the era where students don’t have to carry stacks of  thick heavy books to school anymore. Everything will be digitized and  available at the tip of students’ fingers, inside the iPad (or whatever other tablet can stand alongside the iPad in the future).  Not wanting to waste any more time, some schools have already adopted  the iPad as their learning tool, while students and educators are slowly  figuring out the best way to utilize the iPad for education.
Even  though everybody has their own preferences of using the iPad in their  studies, allow me to share 7 iPad usages to help students excel at  school.

7 Ways To Use The iPad To Help Students Excel At School | MakeUseOf

We are approaching the era where students don’t have to carry stacks of thick heavy books to school anymore. Everything will be digitized and available at the tip of students’ fingers, inside the iPad (or whatever other tablet can stand alongside the iPad in the future). Not wanting to waste any more time, some schools have already adopted the iPad as their learning tool, while students and educators are slowly figuring out the best way to utilize the iPad for education.

Even though everybody has their own preferences of using the iPad in their studies, allow me to share 7 iPad usages to help students excel at school.

One to one computing can still be a great thing but I’ve seen too many classrooms where students stare at screens. They can do at home. What they may not be able to do at home is sit with 2 or 3 classmates and design, talk, build and interact face to face. It’s hard to argue that somehow that’s not different. We’ve taken for granted forever that each day a bus will come by and drop off students at our buildings. We’ve not had to think critically about they way our classrooms and schools operate and so a conversation about what makes face to face special needs to occur. Obviously access and computing needs to be part of the learning but we need to be careful about how we’re leveraging the experience of being together. In many cases the focus on computing might be outside of school as students create content, research and design. It may be the the classroom has a 2 to 1 ratio or 3 to 1 of devices as students do their research and designing collaboratively. Collaboration and interaction become the norm and not the exception. In this way, we acknowledge the wonderful human resource we have each day and design learning that truly takes advantage of our most important resource, each other.

HeartWorks Virtual Heart Simulator, Powered by NVidia Quadro
Source: VizWorld

A new press release from NVidia discusses an interesting project from the University College London Hospitals (UCLH) Heart Hospital and UK Visual effects company Glassworks.  Together they build a virtual heart simulator perfect for transesophageal echocardiography (Imaging the heart through the mouth & esophagus) training.  Using the impressive power of NVidia Quadro GPU’s and 3D Vision technology, they’re able to maintain realistic stereoscopic images running at a full 30fps.  In fact, it’s already an integral part of training at Duke University.

“Simulation technology has enabled us to take a quantum leap forward in our teaching,” said Dr. Madhav Swaminathan, MD, FASE, FAHA, of Duke University School of Medicine’s Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia. “This particular system essentially simulates the beating heart clearly”

HeartWorks Virtual Heart Simulator, Powered by NVidia Quadro

Source: VizWorld

A new press release from NVidia discusses an interesting project from the University College London Hospitals (UCLH) Heart Hospital and UK Visual effects company Glassworks.  Together they build a virtual heart simulator perfect for transesophageal echocardiography (Imaging the heart through the mouth & esophagus) training.  Using the impressive power of NVidia Quadro GPU’s and 3D Vision technology, they’re able to maintain realistic stereoscopic images running at a full 30fps.  In fact, it’s already an integral part of training at Duke University.

“Simulation technology has enabled us to take a quantum leap forward in our teaching,” said Dr. Madhav Swaminathan, MD, FASE, FAHA, of Duke University School of Medicine’s Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia. “This particular system essentially simulates the beating heart clearly”

OpenCourseWare  Consortium
An OpenCourseWare is a free and open digital publication of high quality educational materials, organized as courses. The OpenCourseWare Consortium is a collaboration of more than 200 higher education institutions and associated organizations from around the world creating a broad and deep body of open educational content using a shared model. The mission of the OpenCourseWare Consortium is to advance education and empower people worldwide through opencourseware.

OpenCourseWare Consortium

An OpenCourseWare is a free and open digital publication of high quality educational materials, organized as courses. The OpenCourseWare Consortium is a collaboration of more than 200 higher education institutions and associated organizations from around the world creating a broad and deep body of open educational content using a shared model. The mission of the OpenCourseWare Consortium is to advance education and empower people worldwide through opencourseware.

New York Launches Public School Curriculum Based on Playing Games | Popular Science
Games have long played a role in classrooms, but next month marks the launch of the first U.S. public school curriculum based entirely on game-inspired learning. Select sixth graders can look forward to playing video games such as “Little Big Planet” and “Civilization,” as well as non-digital games ranging from role-playing scenarios to board games and card games.

New York Launches Public School Curriculum Based on Playing Games | Popular Science

Games have long played a role in classrooms, but next month marks the launch of the first U.S. public school curriculum based entirely on game-inspired learning. Select sixth graders can look forward to playing video games such as “Little Big Planet” and “Civilization,” as well as non-digital games ranging from role-playing scenarios to board games and card games.

What are Siftables?

Siftables are cookie-sized computers with motion sensing, neighbor detection, graphical display, and wireless communication. They act in concert to form a single interface: users physically manipulate them - piling, grouping, sorting - to interact with digital information and media. Siftables provides a new platform on which to implement tangible, visual and mobile applications.

Siftables