inspirezme:

Memoto, known as the “life logging camera”, has gained publicity for taking self-documentation to the next level. There are many critiques of the system and the overall goal of documenting your whole life. However, I want to focus on the benefits when talking about this revolutionary idea. 

What if you could go back and remember the little moments in your day that made you smile, that inspired you, that just made you happy? Memoto creates a “life library”, allowing you to filter through your days and find images taken twice a minute. The divice is small, about the size of a watch, letting you to clip it on and then forget about it. It has a long battery life, lasting about two full days without a charge. Memoto began as yet another KickStarter success and is now available for pre-order. Are you ready for a photography memory?

(View video/article here)

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(via npr)

Memoto, A Wearable Camera That Documents Your Life
Memoto is a tiny wearable camera that documents the wearer’s life by automatically taking a photo every 30 seconds (video). The 1.5 inch square, 5 megapixel camera has no buttons or controls, and automatically begins taking photos whenever it is clipped on by the wearer. The photos are tagged with time stamps and location (thanks to built-in GPS), and can be browsed and shared via an iPhone or Android app. The camera’s rechargeable battery allows it to take photos continuously for 2 days (that’s 4,000 photos) before it needs to be connected to a computer for charging and uploading to Memoto’s servers. Memoto’s Swedish designers are currently developing the camera for manufacture. They are pre-selling Memoto on Kickstarter. The camera is expected to ship in February, 2013.)

Memoto, A Wearable Camera That Documents Your Life

Memoto is a tiny wearable camera that documents the wearer’s life by automatically taking a photo every 30 seconds (video). The 1.5 inch square, 5 megapixel camera has no buttons or controls, and automatically begins taking photos whenever it is clipped on by the wearer. The photos are tagged with time stamps and location (thanks to built-in GPS), and can be browsed and shared via an iPhone or Android app. The camera’s rechargeable battery allows it to take photos continuously for 2 days (that’s 4,000 photos) before it needs to be connected to a computer for charging and uploading to Memoto’s servers. Memoto’s Swedish designers are currently developing the camera for manufacture. They are pre-selling Memoto on Kickstarter. The camera is expected to ship in February, 2013.)

(via laughingsquid)

Steven Wolfram: The Personal Analytics of My Life

One day I’m sure everyone will routinely collect all sorts of data about themselves. But because I’ve been interested in data for a very long time, I started doing this long ago. I actually assumed lots of other people were doing it too, but apparently they were not. And so now I have what is probably one of the world’s largest collections of personal data.

Every day—in an effort at “self awareness”—I have automated systems send me a few emails about the day before. But even though I’ve been accumulating data for years—and always meant to analyze it—I’ve never actually gotten around to doing it. But with Mathematica and the automated data analysis capabilities we just released in Wolfram|Alpha Pro, I thought now would be a good time to finally try taking a look—and to use myself as an experimental subject for studying what one might call “personal analytics”.

You’re going to want to click through and read all of this.

via poptech:

Your Life as Data: The Rise of Personal Annual Reports | Mashable
Every time he drinks a cup of coffee, Dan Meyer makes a note on his phone. He does the same every time he opens a beer, turns on his TV or travels away from home. At the end of each month, he spends about three hours transferring these meticulously gathered notes into an excel spreadsheet. Meyer isn’t obsessive compulsive, he just likes data. Like an increasing number of data geeks, he uses his personal life as a project — compiling small events into a sometimes elaborate, graphic annual report each January.

Your Life as Data: The Rise of Personal Annual Reports | Mashable

Every time he drinks a cup of coffee, Dan Meyer makes a note on his phone. He does the same every time he opens a beer, turns on his TV or travels away from home. At the end of each month, he spends about three hours transferring these meticulously gathered notes into an excel spreadsheet. Meyer isn’t obsessive compulsive, he just likes data. Like an increasing number of data geeks, he uses his personal life as a project — compiling small events into a sometimes elaborate, graphic annual report each January.

Nebul.us Shows You Your Activity on the Web | FlowingData
Nebul.us is an online application, currently in private beta, that aggregates and visualizes your online activity. Enter your information for Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, etc and install a plugin in Firefox to record your browsing behavior. Get something that looks like the above, sort of a donut-polar area chart hybrid. Nebul.us calls it a cloud.

Nebul.us Shows You Your Activity on the Web | FlowingData

Nebul.us is an online application, currently in private beta, that aggregates and visualizes your online activity. Enter your information for Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, etc and install a plugin in Firefox to record your browsing behavior. Get something that looks like the above, sort of a donut-polar area chart hybrid. Nebul.us calls it a cloud.

Online memory, or LifeLogging or e-memory as it’s called, is probably closer than you may think. Here are 22 tools can let you put your life online today.
 
What if you could remember everything—every person you’ve met, every conversation you’ve had—and then retrieve that information in an instant? You would never lose a phone number. You’d  be able to share those fleeting memories with anyone and find where you put those damn keys. 

Participatory Sensing - An Interview with Deborah Estrin - O’Reilly Radar

The iPhone is a rich portable computer with onboard sensors. Specifically, it is a location-aware (GPS), motion-aware (accelerometer), directionally-aware (digital compass) visually aware (camera being used to scan QA codes or serve as visual input), sonically aware (microphone and speakers), always-connected (wireless or 3Gs) handheld computer. Every operative word in that sentence is deeply meaningful and rich with possibilities we have just begun to explore. The iPhone does a whole lot more than display information. It is an environmental sensor. Its value lies just as much in sensing information as it does in displaying information.

SenseCam records a person’s entire life

SenseCam, a camera you can wear as a pendant to record every moment of your life, will soon be launched by a U.K.-based firm. Originally invented to help jog the memories of people with Alzheimer’s disease, it might one day be used by consumers to create “lifelogs” that archive their entire lives.Worn on a cord around the neck, the camera takes pictures automatically as often as once every 30 seconds. It also uses an accelerometer and light sensors to snap an image when a person enters a new environment, and an infrared sensor to take one when it detects the body heat of a person in front of the wearer. It can fit 30,000 images onto its 1-gigabyte memory.

In the next five years, technology tools will help you recall, sort and organize all the information you have to deal with every day. One such project is a European Union-funded initiative called HERMES Cognitive Care for Active Aging. HERMES is geared toward helping seniors remember important details of their daily lives and improve their short-term memory—all without requiring that they become technology-savvy. Microphones and video cameras will record conversations and activities and the information collected will be automatically stored and analyzed on a personal computer. (via IBM - 5 innovations in the next 5 years)

In the next five years, technology tools will help you recall, sort and organize all the information you have to deal with every day. One such project is a European Union-funded initiative called HERMES Cognitive Care for Active Aging. HERMES is geared toward helping seniors remember important details of their daily lives and improve their short-term memory—all without requiring that they become technology-savvy. Microphones and video cameras will record conversations and activities and the information collected will be automatically stored and analyzed on a personal computer. (via IBM - 5 innovations in the next 5 years)

reQall is a voice-enabled memory aid that seamlessly integrates your mobile phone, email, text messaging and IM into a powerful organizer, reminder system and productivity assistant. reQall lets you capture your ideas, tasks and commitments before you forget, and it proactively keeps you well-prepared and memory-strong.

IBM bares next five tech innovations

SOLAR technology in clothes, “talking” to the Internet and personal “digital shopping assistants:” these innovations will take place in five years or less, IBM said.

Tech Addicts » IBM bares next five tech innovations