Garmin HUD projects directions onto your windshield | The Car Tech blog
Smartphones have pretty much taken over as the default navigation tool for many drivers. However, some locales (including our home state of California) have outright banned smartphone use in the  car: no windshield mounts, no dashboard cradles. So, how are you going to get your turn-by-turn directions when looking at your phone is illegal? Today, Garmin announced a new way to interact with its StreetPilot and Navigon smartphone navigation apps: the HUD.
HUD — short for head-up display — sits on the dashboard at the base of the windshield, where it projects navigation data upwards into the driver’s line of sight, either onto a transparent film affixed to the windshield glass or a reflector lens that attaches to the HUD device. Both the film and reflector lens are included with the device.
Garmin states that HUD will automatically adjust the brightness of its projections, so that the display remains visible in direct sunlight or at night. The device will be powered by a 12V charging cable with an integrated USB port for keeping your smartphone charged as well.

Garmin HUD projects directions onto your windshield | The Car Tech blog

Smartphones have pretty much taken over as the default navigation tool for many drivers. However, some locales (including our home state of California) have outright banned smartphone use in the car: no windshield mounts, no dashboard cradles. So, how are you going to get your turn-by-turn directions when looking at your phone is illegal? Today, Garmin announced a new way to interact with its StreetPilot and Navigon smartphone navigation apps: the HUD.

HUD — short for head-up display — sits on the dashboard at the base of the windshield, where it projects navigation data upwards into the driver’s line of sight, either onto a transparent film affixed to the windshield glass or a reflector lens that attaches to the HUD device. Both the film and reflector lens are included with the device.

Garmin states that HUD will automatically adjust the brightness of its projections, so that the display remains visible in direct sunlight or at night. The device will be powered by a 12V charging cable with an integrated USB port for keeping your smartphone charged as well.

Cambridge Consultants develops indoor tech to pick up where GPS drops off
Indoor navigation isn’t a new concept, but it often requires wireless signals or custom infrastructure, neither of which are entirely reliable. Cambridge Consultants has come up with an as-yet-unnamed technology that purports to solve the issue by utilizing low-power sensors along with a custom formula that don’t require an existing framework. According to the Cambridge, UK-based company, all you need are its special Bayesian algorithm and run-of-the-mill smartphone components like accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers to do the job. It has already built a concept chipset (seen above) that could be embedded in existing devices — you can either map your location directly on it or send that info off to a remote system. The firm says the technology will be useful for firefighters and hospital workers, though we wouldn’t complain if it’s implemented in trade shows either. For more information on the tech, check the press release after the break.

Cambridge Consultants develops indoor tech to pick up where GPS drops off

Indoor navigation isn’t a new concept, but it often requires wireless signals or custom infrastructure, neither of which are entirely reliable. Cambridge Consultants has come up with an as-yet-unnamed technology that purports to solve the issue by utilizing low-power sensors along with a custom formula that don’t require an existing framework. According to the Cambridge, UK-based company, all you need are its special Bayesian algorithm and run-of-the-mill smartphone components like accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers to do the job. It has already built a concept chipset (seen above) that could be embedded in existing devices — you can either map your location directly on it or send that info off to a remote system. The firm says the technology will be useful for firefighters and hospital workers, though we wouldn’t complain if it’s implemented in trade shows either. For more information on the tech, check the press release after the break.

emergentfutures:

What Happens When Our Cellphones Can Predict Our Every Move?



Your cellphone knows where you’ve been. And new research shows it can take a pretty good guess at where you’re going next.


A team of British researchers has developed an algorithm that uses tracking data on people’s phones to predict where they’ll be in 24 hours. The average error: just 20 meters.
Paul Higgins: You need to be careful when interpreting this because an average error of 20 metres hides a lot of information. For instance if the sampling is every minute then the average becomes lower because most people will be at home or work most of the time.
Full Story: Slate

emergentfutures:

What Happens When Our Cellphones Can Predict Our Every Move?



Your cellphone knows where you’ve been. And new research shows it can take a pretty good guess at where you’re going next.

A team of British researchers has developed an algorithm that uses tracking data on people’s phones to predict where they’ll be in 24 hours. The average error: just 20 meters.

Paul Higgins: You need to be careful when interpreting this because an average error of 20 metres hides a lot of information. For instance if the sampling is every minute then the average becomes lower because most people will be at home or work most of the time.

Full Story: Slate

ibmsocialbiz:

A very cool ad. Shows how mobile apps can grab real-time data from a phone’s camera, accelerometer, compass, GPS, WiFi, and Bluetooth, determine where you are (via GPS and/or WiFi), whether you’re on foot or in a car (via the accelerometer), and what you’re photographing. Geo-fencing capabilities transmit advertisements and marketing materials  only to phones in selected locations. 

Via The CMO Site.

smartercities:

SkyHook and SimpleGeo Present SpotRank, Now You Can Always Find Where The People Are - O’Reilly Radar
Skyhook Wireless released a huge set of location trend data. SpotRank, as the data is called, shares out ranking trends for locations around the world. The maps above show the SpotRanks of those locations.  

smartercities:

SkyHook and SimpleGeo Present SpotRank, Now You Can Always Find Where The People Are - O’Reilly Radar

Skyhook Wireless released a huge set of location trend data. SpotRank, as the data is called, shares out ranking trends for locations around the world. The maps above show the SpotRanks of those locations.  

2009 Horizon Report » Four to Five Years: Semantic-Aware Applications

TripIt, a social semantic-aware application for travelers, organizes travel plans and makes useful connections; a TripIt user simply forwards a confirmation email from any travel provider — airlines, hotels, car rentals, event tickets — and TripIt automatically creates an itinerary by interpreting and organizing the information in the email according to its semantic context.

(N.B. TripIt is now integrated for Lotus Notes users and LinkedIn Members…trying to encourage its use across IBM’s GBS consulting unit)

2009 Horizon Report » Four to Five Years: Semantic-Aware Applications

New BlackBerry application could enhance campus security

An innovative piece of BlackBerry technology developed by a group of engineering students at Yale University could add another dimension to campus safety.The free smartphone application called BScope allows BlackBerrys to use raw GPS data to provide highly accurate information on the movements of the phone’s owner.

New BlackBerry application could enhance campus security - The Daily Pennsylvanian

An estimated two billion people will be on the Web by 2011—and they’ll be doing more than talking. Video on demand, IP television and Internet TV will account for nearly 90% of consumer IP traffic by 2012. When people talk, it will be to many more people—via social networking sites, whose memberships will top 500 million in the next three years. (via IBM - Conversations for a Smarter Planet: 10 in a Series)

An estimated two billion people will be on the Web by 2011—and they’ll be doing more than talking. Video on demand, IP television and Internet TV will account for nearly 90% of consumer IP traffic by 2012. When people talk, it will be to many more people—via social networking sites, whose memberships will top 500 million in the next three years. (via IBM - Conversations for a Smarter Planet: 10 in a Series)