100-Mile Houses Expand the Locavore Movement From Food to Architecture - Design - GOOD
Briony Penn’s 100-mile house in Salt Spring Island, British Columbia
The rise of the locavore movement introduced millions of people to the 100-mile diet,  which involves eating only food produced within one’s own region. Now, a  new focus on sustainable architecture is applying the same concept to  homes.
The idea of a 100-mile house shouldn’t be shocking:  Historically, most homes were made using local materials simply because  it was more practical. But in an age when even middle-class homeowners  can order marble countertops from Italy and bamboo floors from China,  creating a home entirely from local materials challenges builders to  carefully consider every piece of the structure, from the foundation to  the eaves.
Last week, the Architecture Foundation of British Columbia launched an international competition to design a 1,200-square-foot, four-person home that exclusively uses  materials made or recycled within 100 miles of Vancouver. David M.  Hewitt, the current chair of the Architecture Foundation, came up with  the idea for the competition on a whim and presented it at a board  meeting. “It was almost thrown out facetiously, and everybody latched  onto it,” he says

100-Mile Houses Expand the Locavore Movement From Food to Architecture - Design - GOOD

Briony Penn’s 100-mile house in Salt Spring Island, British Columbia

The rise of the locavore movement introduced millions of people to the 100-mile diet, which involves eating only food produced within one’s own region. Now, a new focus on sustainable architecture is applying the same concept to homes.

The idea of a 100-mile house shouldn’t be shocking: Historically, most homes were made using local materials simply because it was more practical. But in an age when even middle-class homeowners can order marble countertops from Italy and bamboo floors from China, creating a home entirely from local materials challenges builders to carefully consider every piece of the structure, from the foundation to the eaves.

Last week, the Architecture Foundation of British Columbia launched an international competition to design a 1,200-square-foot, four-person home that exclusively uses materials made or recycled within 100 miles of Vancouver. David M. Hewitt, the current chair of the Architecture Foundation, came up with the idea for the competition on a whim and presented it at a board meeting. “It was almost thrown out facetiously, and everybody latched onto it,” he says