The emergence of mobile-supported national health information systems in developing countries | MobileActive.org

A major challenge for national health information systems in developing countries is their scalability and sustainability at the lowest levels where primary health care is delivered. This paper contributes to the discourse on how national health information systems can scale to the lower levels and how mobile technology is supporting the collection, handling and dissemination of data. But can mHealth go beyond the ‘hype’ and visions it has come to be associated with? Using an action research methodology in a long-term action research project, the usability and then scalability of mobile solutions for large scale national health information systems are studied. In this paper, initial successes and challenges with using m-Health for national public health information systems is reported and discussed.

There’s a huge group of mobile users that you may be overlooking as you develop your hospital’s mobile strategy. They’re “information seekers,” and they will be the largest cohort of mobile healthcare consumers in the future, according to a new report by IBM, “The Future of Connected Health Devices.” Traditional mHealth users are a small percentage of highly motivated individuals with significant fitness goals or debilitating chronic conditions. Both groups are willing to put in the time to learn and use smartphone apps, remote monitoring devices and other mobile health products, IBM’s researchers found in their study of more than 1,300 mobile health device users.

eMOCHA: Android Data Collection for mHealth | MobileActive.org
Using mobiles for data collection is increasingly common,  particularly in the area of mobile health and with a focus on community  health workers. eMOCHA is a program using a smartphone Android application for storing and transmitting data easily.Developed by the Johns Hopkins Center for Clinical Global Health Education,  eMOCHA (which stands for “Electronic Mobile Open-source Comprehensive  Health Application”) uses video, audio, touchscreen quizzes, GPS and SMS  to collect and analyze large amounts of data. Larry William Chang,  director of field evaluations for eMOCHA, explains in an interview with  MobileActive.org that the inspiration for developing the tool came out  of researchers’ experiences in the field and their desire to build  solutions to gaps in health care data collection systems.
Fellow team members include Miquel Sitjar, lead developer for eMOCHA,  and Robert Bollinger, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Clinical  Global Health Education. Chang says, “We all had these public health  problems and these education and training problems that we were looking  to solve, and we wanted to build a mobile-based platform that could  address all the different challenges we were facing. So we designed  eMOCHA to address some of the public health and patient care problems  that we were seeing with our other work.” eMOCHA’s first deployment  began in October of 2010, and new pilots have been announced for 2011.

eMOCHA: Android Data Collection for mHealth | MobileActive.org

Using mobiles for data collection is increasingly common, particularly in the area of mobile health and with a focus on community health workers. eMOCHA is a program using a smartphone Android application for storing and transmitting data easily.

Developed by the Johns Hopkins Center for Clinical Global Health Education, eMOCHA (which stands for “Electronic Mobile Open-source Comprehensive Health Application”) uses video, audio, touchscreen quizzes, GPS and SMS to collect and analyze large amounts of data. Larry William Chang, director of field evaluations for eMOCHA, explains in an interview with MobileActive.org that the inspiration for developing the tool came out of researchers’ experiences in the field and their desire to build solutions to gaps in health care data collection systems.

Fellow team members include Miquel Sitjar, lead developer for eMOCHA, and Robert Bollinger, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Clinical Global Health Education. Chang says, “We all had these public health problems and these education and training problems that we were looking to solve, and we wanted to build a mobile-based platform that could address all the different challenges we were facing. So we designed eMOCHA to address some of the public health and patient care problems that we were seeing with our other work.” eMOCHA’s first deployment began in October of 2010, and new pilots have been announced for 2011.