ibmsocialbiz:

. An accurate map of global power, influence, and connectedness would include a wide range of countries (orange), cities (blue), companies (yellow), and communities or other types of organizations (green), all of whom can form ties directly with each other. Via Fast Company Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation 

ibmsocialbiz:

. An accurate map of global power, influence, and connectedness would include a wide range of countries (orange), cities (blue), companies (yellow), and communities or other types of organizations (green), all of whom can form ties directly with each other. Via Fast Company Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation 

Geospatial Revolution Project | A Public Media Project
The Geospatial Revolution Project is an integrated public service media  and outreach initiative about the world of digital mapping and how it is  changing the way we think, behave, and interact.

Geospatial Revolution Project | A Public Media Project

The Geospatial Revolution Project is an integrated public service media and outreach initiative about the world of digital mapping and how it is changing the way we think, behave, and interact.

Mapping  the Oil Spill in Real Time
In the wake of the BP oil disaster, real-time mapping technologies have been recruited to improve communication and promote collaboration between people in local communities, as well as federal, state and local responders. Last week NOAA released GeoPlatform.gov to provide near-real-time mapping data to those connected to the crisis. The site lets you track everything from daily spill positions to the locations of ships responding to the crisis. State and non-governmental organizations are also collecting and mapping real-time information. In some instances the efforts include citizen-generated data from iPhone apps and photos mapped on sites like Flickr.

Mapping the Oil Spill in Real Time

In the wake of the BP oil disaster, real-time mapping technologies have been recruited to improve communication and promote collaboration between people in local communities, as well as federal, state and local responders. Last week NOAA released GeoPlatform.gov to provide near-real-time mapping data to those connected to the crisis. The site lets you track everything from daily spill positions to the locations of ships responding to the crisis. State and non-governmental organizations are also collecting and mapping real-time information. In some instances the efforts include citizen-generated data from iPhone apps and photos mapped on sites like Flickr.

AI: Analytics Innovators: Episode 2 (RecycleBank , Earthmine, FitBit Tracker)

This web video series features ground-breaking companies, services and products that epitomize the era of new intelligence that IBM’s Business Analytics & Optimization Services was born into.

See more BAO content and clips at the Global Business Services New Intelligence Video Studio.  Know of other analytics innovators we should feature? Share in comments here!

  • RecycleBank a kind of “frequent recycling” rewards program
  • Earthmine a 3D city mapping service based on Mars Rover technology
  • FitBit Tracker a $99 wearable health monitoring device that measures your bodily activity and sleep patterns
The geoweb is going 3D. Google is bringing Google Earth into the browser via a plug-in. Photosynth, 3D photo collection creator and viewer, is moving into the Microsoft’s Virtual Earth team (this was posted about on July 26th; the post was removed, but is still findable in the cache’s of both Google and Live). Google’s Panoramio, a location-oriented photo-sharing site, has released their own 3D-ish photo viewer (see the Sydney Opera House and launch coverage on Google Earth Blog). And the geo teams of both Google and Microsoft have their own 3D modelers, Sketchup and trueSpace (more info) respectively. earthmine measuring building However the imagery that you see in VE or Google is not 3D. That is where Earthmine, a Berkeley-based startup is hoping to come in (Radar post). They are currently mapping four cities with NASA technology and a custom-designed camera rig. Each pixel in an image is assigned 3D coordinate. Capturing this data allows for a multitude of future applications. (via Earthmine: Imagery for a 3D Geoweb - O’Reilly Radar)

The geoweb is going 3D. Google is bringing Google Earth into the browser via a plug-in. Photosynth, 3D photo collection creator and viewer, is moving into the Microsoft’s Virtual Earth team (this was posted about on July 26th; the post was removed, but is still findable in the cache’s of both Google and Live). Google’s Panoramio, a location-oriented photo-sharing site, has released their own 3D-ish photo viewer (see the Sydney Opera House and launch coverage on Google Earth Blog). And the geo teams of both Google and Microsoft have their own 3D modelers, Sketchup and trueSpace (more info) respectively. earthmine measuring building However the imagery that you see in VE or Google is not 3D. That is where Earthmine, a Berkeley-based startup is hoping to come in (Radar post). They are currently mapping four cities with NASA technology and a custom-designed camera rig. Each pixel in an image is assigned 3D coordinate. Capturing this data allows for a multitude of future applications. (via Earthmine: Imagery for a 3D Geoweb - O’Reilly Radar)

New rainforest mapping technology gets huge support

The new technology called High-fidelity Imaging Spectroscopy (HiFIS) is part of the Carnegie Spectranomics Project. A unique airborne mapping system that can inventory and probe rain forest vegetation over nearly 40,000 acres per day.

New rainforest mapping technology gets huge support