Making Transit Social by Mission Possible (by GOODIdeasforCities)

As part of GOOD Ideas for Cities Cincinnati, Mission Possible presents their idea for encouraging more residents to ride a new bus rapid transit system. The team is then joined by GOOD Ideas for Cities editor Alissa Walker and Sallie Hilvers, Metro; Gina Douthat, TANK; Mary Stagaman, Agenda 360 and Adena Kass and Bill Scheyer, Vision 2015.

Rio de Janeiro’s Transit Solution: Cable Cars Over the Favelas

Source: Wired

The slums of Rio de Janeiro—the infamous favelas—pile onto and up and over the city’s iconic steep hillsides. Simply getting from point A to point B requires a sub-alphabet of zigzaggery up stairs, over switchbacks, and through alleyways that can be just a few feet wide. There’s nowhere for public transit to go. Nowhere, that is, but up.

That’s the direction for the newest transportation system in Rio, slated to open in March: a six-station gondola line running above a collection of favelas known as the Complexo do Alemão. The government says that 152 gondolas will carry 30,000 people a day along a 2.1-mile route over the neighborhood, transforming the hour-and-a-half trudge to a nearby commuter rail station into a 16-minute sky ride.

Taiwan High Speed Rail Corporation (THSRC) is using IBM software to manage maintenance and logistics for the revolutionary high-speed rail network that runs along the west coast of Taiwan.  The express trains are capable of traveling at up to 186 miles per hour (300 km/hr) meaning travel between Taipei City and Kaohsiung City is only roughly 90 minutes as opposed to the 4.5 hours by conventional rail.
A large portion of what makes a successful network is its computer technology, according to IBM, which is angling for government business in transportation and rail. (via IBM hops aboard high-speed rail  CNET News)

Taiwan High Speed Rail Corporation (THSRC) is using IBM software to manage maintenance and logistics for the revolutionary high-speed rail network that runs along the west coast of Taiwan.  The express trains are capable of traveling at up to 186 miles per hour (300 km/hr) meaning travel between Taipei City and Kaohsiung City is only roughly 90 minutes as opposed to the 4.5 hours by conventional rail.

A large portion of what makes a successful network is its computer technology, according to IBM, which is angling for government business in transportation and rail. (via IBM hops aboard high-speed rail  CNET News)

NYC Goes Wireless & Vehicles Talk to Everything


Instead of trying to change drivers’ behavior by charging them more to drive on the road they want, Caltrans District 4 deployed variable message signs on major routes around the San Francisco area that informed drivers of how current travel times on the road compared against the real time travel times of transit options.

Cascadia Prospectus