Concrete, the world’s most abundant man-made substance, ranks second to coal as the world’s dirtiest industrial material. But a company in Halifax, Canada, is working to make concrete plants carbon neutral, using captured CO2 to improve their product. More here.

Concrete, the world’s most abundant man-made substance, ranks second to coal as the world’s dirtiest industrial material. But a company in Halifax, Canada, is working to make concrete plants carbon neutral, using captured CO2 to improve their product. More here.

(via thisbigcity)

New wonder material replaces graphene for future electronic devices | KurzweilAI
Entirely new kinds of devices —- entire walls of light, smart windows, eyeglass displays, complex electronic circuits —- from new 2D molybdenum disulfide: MIT researchers
MIT researchers — who struggled for several years to build electronic circuits out of graphene with very limited results (except for radio-frequency applications) — have now succeeded in making a variety of electronic components from an amazing new material: a 2D version of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2).
The MIT researchers say the material could help usher in radically new products, from whole walls that glow to clothing with embedded electronics to glasses with built-in display screens.

New wonder material replaces graphene for future electronic devices | KurzweilAI

Entirely new kinds of devices —- entire walls of light, smart windows, eyeglass displays, complex electronic circuits —- from new 2D molybdenum disulfide: MIT researchers

MIT researchers — who struggled for several years to build electronic circuits out of graphene with very limited results (except for radio-frequency applications) — have now succeeded in making a variety of electronic components from an amazing new material: a 2D version of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2).

The MIT researchers say the material could help usher in radically new products, from whole walls that glow to clothing with embedded electronics to glasses with built-in display screens.

GM Bets on Lightweight, Malleable NanoSteel | Autopia | Wired.com
General Motors is looking to raise its lineup’s miles-per-gallon figures, starting with the exterior. GM Ventures LLC has invested in NanoSteel, a Rhode Island company with 34 employees that makes metals with altered grain structures. If developed to production, the material will potentially shave weight off Cadillacs and Chevrolets without losing the strength needed to survive a crash. The terms of the investment were not disclosed.
Jon Lauckner, president of GM Ventures LLC, said, “Over the next several years, light-weighting of vehicles will be a major focus area to improve fuel economy.” The hope is that this new material will help American cars hit the government-mandated 2025 requirement of averaging 54.5 MPG. The NanoSteel will be used in the “body in white” (BIW) section, the steel of the car body that’s manufactured before other components – including doors and a hood – are added. That’s the space where integrity needs to be strongest rather than soft, like a crumple zone. The weight reduction, GM and NanoSteel say, is in the “hundreds” of pounds.

GM Bets on Lightweight, Malleable NanoSteel | Autopia | Wired.com

General Motors is looking to raise its lineup’s miles-per-gallon figures, starting with the exterior. GM Ventures LLC has invested in NanoSteel, a Rhode Island company with 34 employees that makes metals with altered grain structures. If developed to production, the material will potentially shave weight off Cadillacs and Chevrolets without losing the strength needed to survive a crash. The terms of the investment were not disclosed.

Jon Lauckner, president of GM Ventures LLC, said, “Over the next several years, light-weighting of vehicles will be a major focus area to improve fuel economy.” The hope is that this new material will help American cars hit the government-mandated 2025 requirement of averaging 54.5 MPG. The NanoSteel will be used in the “body in white” (BIW) section, the steel of the car body that’s manufactured before other components – including doors and a hood – are added. That’s the space where integrity needs to be strongest rather than soft, like a crumple zone. The weight reduction, GM and NanoSteel say, is in the “hundreds” of pounds.

New material could enable wearable electronics.
The University of Exeter in England have created the most transparent, lightweight and flexible material ever for conducting electricity. Called GraphExeter, the material could revolutionise the creation of wearable electronic devices, such as clothing containing computers, phones and MP3 players.
GraphExeter could also be used for the creation of ‘smart’ mirrors or windows, with computerised interactive features. Since this material is also transparent over a wide light spectrum, it could enhance by more than 30% the efficiency of solar panels.
Adapted from graphene, GraphExeter is much more flexible than indium tin oxide (ITO), the main conductive material currently used in electronics. ITO is becoming increasingly expensive and is a finite resource, expected to run out in 2017.
To create GraphExeter, the Exeter team sandwiched molecules of ferric chloride between two layers of graphene. Ferric chloride enhances the electrical conductivity of graphene, without affecting the material’s transparency.
via 8bitfuture:

New material could enable wearable electronics.

The University of Exeter in England have created the most transparent, lightweight and flexible material ever for conducting electricity. Called GraphExeter, the material could revolutionise the creation of wearable electronic devices, such as clothing containing computers, phones and MP3 players.

GraphExeter could also be used for the creation of ‘smart’ mirrors or windows, with computerised interactive features. Since this material is also transparent over a wide light spectrum, it could enhance by more than 30% the efficiency of solar panels.

Adapted from graphene, GraphExeter is much more flexible than indium tin oxide (ITO), the main conductive material currently used in electronics. ITO is becoming increasingly expensive and is a finite resource, expected to run out in 2017.

To create GraphExeter, the Exeter team sandwiched molecules of ferric chloride between two layers of graphene. Ferric chloride enhances the electrical conductivity of graphene, without affecting the material’s transparency.

via 8bitfuture:

(via 8bitfuture)

Self-replication process holds promise for production of new materials | Science Daily
New York University scientists have developed artificial structures that  can self-replicate, a process that has the potential to yield new types  of materials. In the natural world, self-replication is ubiquitous in  all living entities, but artificial self-replication has been elusive.  The new discovery is the first steps toward a general process for  self-replication of a wide variety of arbitrarily designed seeds. The  seeds are made from DNA tile motifs that serve as letters arranged to  spell out a particular word.

Self-replication process holds promise for production of new materials | Science Daily

New York University scientists have developed artificial structures that can self-replicate, a process that has the potential to yield new types of materials. In the natural world, self-replication is ubiquitous in all living entities, but artificial self-replication has been elusive. The new discovery is the first steps toward a general process for self-replication of a wide variety of arbitrarily designed seeds. The seeds are made from DNA tile motifs that serve as letters arranged to spell out a particular word.

Graphene Films Enabling Miracle Nanomaterials
Source: Smarter Technology

Pure carbon thin-films just nanometers thick are enabling a new era of miracle applications, from windshields so slick they don’t require wipers to thermoelectric materials that drastically reduce energy generation costs by harvesting waste heat.

Graphene—pure carbon thin-film—has a wide variety of uses beyond its potential in semiconductor manufacturing, from reducing the drag on ships’ hulls to recovering lost energy at coal-fired electricity generation plants, according to separate research projects at Vanderbilt University and the Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) at Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland).

Graphene Films Enabling Miracle Nanomaterials

Source: Smarter Technology

  • Pure carbon thin-films just nanometers thick are enabling a new era of miracle applications, from windshields so slick they don’t require wipers to thermoelectric materials that drastically reduce energy generation costs by harvesting waste heat.
  • Graphene—pure carbon thin-film—has a wide variety of uses beyond its potential in semiconductor manufacturing, from reducing the drag on ships’ hulls to recovering lost energy at coal-fired electricity generation plants, according to separate research projects at Vanderbilt University and the Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) at Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland).

Making Stuff: Stronger, Smaller, Cleaner, Smarter

Invisibility cloaks. Spider silk that is stronger than steel. Plastics made of sugar that dissolve in landfills. Self-healing military vehicles. Smart pills and micro-robots that zap diseases. Clothes that monitor your mood. What will the future bring, and what will it be made of? In NOVA’s four-hour series, “Making Stuff,” popular New York Times technology reporter David Pogue takes viewers on a fun-filled tour of the material world we live in, and the one that may lie ahead. Get a behind-the-scenes look at scientific innovations ushering in a new generation of materials that are stronger, smaller, cleaner, and smarter than anything we’ve ever seen.

Beginning January 19, 2011, NOVA will premiere the new four-hour series on consecutive Wednesday nights at 9 pm ET/PT on PBS (check local listings).

PopTech Ecomaterials Innovation Lab participant, Randolph Lewis (and his spiders), to be featured on Nova tomorrow. 

poptech: