Remapping gang turf: Math model shows crimes cluster on borders between rivals | Phys.org

A mathematical model that has been used for more than 80 years to determine the hunting range of animals in the wild holds promise for mapping the territories of street gangs, a UCLA-led team of social scientists reports in a new study.

How Speeding The “Most Important Algorithm Of Our Lifetime” Could Change This Modern World | Fast Company
Math breakthroughs don’t often capture the headlines—but MIT researchers have just made one that could lead to all sorts of amazing technological breakthroughs that in just a few years will touch every hour of your life. 

How Speeding The “Most Important Algorithm Of Our Lifetime” Could Change This Modern World | Fast Company

Math breakthroughs don’t often capture the headlines—but MIT researchers have just made one that could lead to all sorts of amazing technological breakthroughs that in just a few years will touch every hour of your life. 

How an Algorithm Helped Arrange the Names on the 9/11 Memorial:
The memorial’s arrangement preserves, for instance, the terrible blow suffered by the investment bank Cantor Fitzgerald. Before the morning of September 11, the firm’s headquarters occupied several floors high in the North Tower of the World Trade Center (WTC). In the first of the terrorist attacks of that day, a hijacked airliner struck the North Tower, just below Cantor’s offices. The firm was devastated; 658 employees died in the attack, along with 46 contractors, food-service workers, consultants and visitors.Although no heading identifies them as such, the 704 names of those killed at Cantor Fitzgerald appear together on the memorial. Cantor’s loss was so great that its portion of the memorial surrounds almost half of the north pool. Within that grouping, as elsewhere on the memorial, the placement of names also reflects numerous other social and professional connections, thanks to input from families and co-workers and some heavy lifting by a custom-built computer algorithm.
(via Scientific American)
via jtotheizzoe:

How an Algorithm Helped Arrange the Names on the 9/11 Memorial:

The memorial’s arrangement preserves, for instance, the terrible blow suffered by the investment bank Cantor Fitzgerald. Before the morning of September 11, the firm’s headquarters occupied several floors high in the North Tower of the World Trade Center (WTC). In the first of the terrorist attacks of that day, a hijacked airliner struck the North Tower, just below Cantor’s offices. The firm was devastated; 658 employees died in the attack, along with 46 contractors, food-service workers, consultants and visitors.

Although no heading identifies them as such, the 704 names of those killed at Cantor Fitzgerald appear together on the memorial. Cantor’s loss was so great that its portion of the memorial surrounds almost half of the north pool. Within that grouping, as elsewhere on the memorial, the placement of names also reflects numerous other social and professional connections, thanks to input from families and co-workers and some heavy lifting by a custom-built computer algorithm.

(via Scientific American)

via jtotheizzoe:

(via jtotheizzoe)

Business Schools Plan Leap Into Data - WSJ.com
Faced with an increasing stream of data from the Web and other electronic sources, many companies are seeking managers who can make sense of the numbers through the growing practice of data analytics, also known as business intelligence. Finding qualified candidates has proven difficult, but business schools hope to fill the talent gap.
This fall several schools, including Fordham University’s Graduate School of Business and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, are unveiling analytics electives, certificates and degree programs; other courses and programs were launched in the previous school year.
International Business Machines Corp., which has invested more than $14 billion buying analytics industry companies such as Coremetrics and Netezza Corp. since 2005, has teamed up with more than 200 schools, including Fordham, to develop analytics curriculum and training.
"The more students that graduate knowledgeable in areas we care about, the better it is not just for our company but the companies we work with," said Steve Mills, IBM senior vice president and group executive of software and systems. "It really comes down to what clients and customers need most."
Data analytics was once considered the purview of math, science and information-technology specialists. Now barraged with data from the Web and other sources, companies want employees who can both sift through the information and help solve business problems or strategize. For example, luxury fashion company Elie Tahari Ltd. uses analytics to examine historical buying patterns and predict future clothing purchases. Northeastern pizza chain Papa Gino’s Inc. uses analytics to examine the use of its loyalty program and has succeeded in boosting the average customer’s online order size.

Business Schools Plan Leap Into Data - WSJ.com

Faced with an increasing stream of data from the Web and other electronic sources, many companies are seeking managers who can make sense of the numbers through the growing practice of data analytics, also known as business intelligence. Finding qualified candidates has proven difficult, but business schools hope to fill the talent gap.

This fall several schools, including Fordham University’s Graduate School of Business and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, are unveiling analytics electives, certificates and degree programs; other courses and programs were launched in the previous school year.

International Business Machines Corp., which has invested more than $14 billion buying analytics industry companies such as Coremetrics and Netezza Corp. since 2005, has teamed up with more than 200 schools, including Fordham, to develop analytics curriculum and training.

"The more students that graduate knowledgeable in areas we care about, the better it is not just for our company but the companies we work with," said Steve Mills, IBM senior vice president and group executive of software and systems. "It really comes down to what clients and customers need most."

Data analytics was once considered the purview of math, science and information-technology specialists. Now barraged with data from the Web and other sources, companies want employees who can both sift through the information and help solve business problems or strategize. For example, luxury fashion company Elie Tahari Ltd. uses analytics to examine historical buying patterns and predict future clothing purchases. Northeastern pizza chain Papa Gino’s Inc. uses analytics to examine the use of its loyalty program and has succeeded in boosting the average customer’s online order size.

Dietrich acknowledged that some of what she and her fellow mathematicians do is like the life of the lead character on the CBS crime drama “Numb3rs,” where a math Ph.D. applies mathematic solutions to FBI cases. “Numb3rs is one of my favorite TV shows,” she said. Dietrich’s team consists of 200 people throughout the world, 150 of which are Ph.D.’s and the other 50 are masters-level software developers that have undergraduate degrees in math and masters degrees in computer science, she said. John Kelly, senior vice president and director of research at IBM, said, “Our 150 mathematicians make up the largest math department in the world housed in one institution.” (via IBM Makes Math Cool, Current)

Dietrich acknowledged that some of what she and her fellow mathematicians do is like the life of the lead character on the CBS crime drama “Numb3rs,” where a math Ph.D. applies mathematic solutions to FBI cases. “Numb3rs is one of my favorite TV shows,” she said. Dietrich’s team consists of 200 people throughout the world, 150 of which are Ph.D.’s and the other 50 are masters-level software developers that have undergraduate degrees in math and masters degrees in computer science, she said. John Kelly, senior vice president and director of research at IBM, said, “Our 150 mathematicians make up the largest math department in the world housed in one institution.” (via IBM Makes Math Cool, Current)

MIT engineers have been working on a mathematical model that can be used to map out the patterns of turbulence formed by drug eluting stents. With this knowledge it is possible to predict which designs will be less favorable to the formation of stent induced clots, and so let engineers work around potentially bad shapes (via Model Helps Develop Better Cardiac Stent Designs - Medgadget )

MIT engineers have been working on a mathematical model that can be used to map out the patterns of turbulence formed by drug eluting stents. With this knowledge it is possible to predict which designs will be less favorable to the formation of stent induced clots, and so let engineers work around potentially bad shapes (via Model Helps Develop Better Cardiac Stent Designs - Medgadget )