Instead, the focus seems to be on tailoring the company’s magazine properties around the digital consumer. Driving that plan is a trove of research that breaks down readers’ daily news cycle. The “Arc of the Day” study showed that in the morning readers want bite-size headlines and news flashes. In the afternoon, they are often at a desktop computer and want to grab a slide show or video, and at night they have time to engage in a deeper article. A related study also found that the average smartphone owner spends 1.4 hours a day waiting in line while browsing a device.

State of the News Media 2012 - Pew Research Center
This year’s study also includes special reports on the impact of mobile technology and social media on news. Those reports, which feature new survey data, finds that rather than replacing media consumption on digital devices, people who go mobile are getting news on all their devices. They also appear to be getting it more often, and reading for longer periods of time. For example, about a third, 34%, of desktop/laptop news consumers now also get news on a smartphone. About a quarter, 27%, of smartphone news consumers also get news on a tablet. These digital news omnivores are also a large percentage of the smart phone/tablet population. And most of those individuals (78%) still get news on the desktop or laptop as well.
A PEJ survey of more than 3,000 adults also finds that the reputation or brand of a news organization, a very traditional idea, is the most important factor in determining where consumers go for news, and that is even truer on mobile devices than on laptops or desktops. Indeed, despite the explosion in social media use through the likes of Facebook and Twitter, recommendations from friends are not a major factor yet in steering news consumption.
In the post-PC present, we have news up the ying, exploding out of all our devices like volcanic magma. But the Pew verbiage about who profits misses an essential point — typified by the ‘news consumption’ viewpoint they still espouse — we have moved away from audience-centered media to experience-centered media. The experience is what matters, so that’s why the value shifts to the tools we use to use information shaped by the news form factor. Using information is not equivalent to ‘consuming media’, but the media companies don’t get it.
The new media folks desperately want to write for some hypothetical audience, one they can find the center of. They are like border collies, wired to herd sheep and frantic if they can’t find any.
Read the full report.

State of the News Media 2012 - Pew Research Center

This year’s study also includes special reports on the impact of mobile technology and social media on news. Those reports, which feature new survey data, finds that rather than replacing media consumption on digital devices, people who go mobile are getting news on all their devices. They also appear to be getting it more often, and reading for longer periods of time. For example, about a third, 34%, of desktop/laptop news consumers now also get news on a smartphone. About a quarter, 27%, of smartphone news consumers also get news on a tablet. These digital news omnivores are also a large percentage of the smart phone/tablet population. And most of those individuals (78%) still get news on the desktop or laptop as well.

A PEJ survey of more than 3,000 adults also finds that the reputation or brand of a news organization, a very traditional idea, is the most important factor in determining where consumers go for news, and that is even truer on mobile devices than on laptops or desktops. Indeed, despite the explosion in social media use through the likes of Facebook and Twitter, recommendations from friends are not a major factor yet in steering news consumption.

In the post-PC present, we have news up the ying, exploding out of all our devices like volcanic magma. But the Pew verbiage about who profits misses an essential point — typified by the ‘news consumption’ viewpoint they still espouse — we have moved away from audience-centered media to experience-centered media. The experience is what matters, so that’s why the value shifts to the tools we use to use information shaped by the news form factor. Using information is not equivalent to ‘consuming media’, but the media companies don’t get it.

The new media folks desperately want to write for some hypothetical audience, one they can find the center of. They are like border collies, wired to herd sheep and frantic if they can’t find any.

Read the full report.

(via underpaidgenius)

Beyond Digital – Connecting media and entertainment to the future « A Smarter Planet Blog
By Saul Berman, Global Strategy Consulting Leader, IBM Global Business Services
The much heralded “connected consumer era” is no longer on the way; it has arrived. And as connectedness pervades our daily lives, we continue to crave even more. For example, a recent journal reported that people check their smart phones an average of 34 times per day, and more video is updated to YouTube in one month than the three major U.S. networks created in 60 years.
Recently IBM’s think tank, the Institute for Business Value, put on its anthropologist hat and surveyed more than 3,800 consumers in six countries (China, France, Germany, Japan, the UK and the US), compiling our findings in a new study called “Beyond Digital.”
Here’s some of what we uncovered:
Four new types of content consumption behaviors (Viewing on Demand, Non-Linear Viewing, Mobile Viewing and Social Consumption) Also known as “time-shifting,” Viewing on Demand is now the norm – especially in  the UK and the U.S. where more than half of the early adopters and mainstream consumers access online video whenever it suits their schedules through sites such as Hulu and Netflix, or via video on demand services through their home TVs.Three fourths of the adultswe surveyed are “Non-Linear Viewers,” admitting to surfing the web and texting while watching television. Mobile Viewing is also gaining traction, with more than 50 percent of early adopter and mainstream consumer respondents in Japan, the UK and the U.S. regularly accessing content on their smart phones or other portable devices. Social Consumption is also on the rise: across the global sample, 46 percent fall in this category — using digital content to communicate socially (via Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.).

Beyond Digital – Connecting media and entertainment to the future « A Smarter Planet Blog

By Saul Berman, Global Strategy Consulting Leader, IBM Global Business Services

The much heralded “connected consumer era” is no longer on the way; it has arrived. And as connectedness pervades our daily lives, we continue to crave even more. For example, a recent journal reported that people check their smart phones an average of 34 times per day, and more video is updated to YouTube in one month than the three major U.S. networks created in 60 years.

Recently IBM’s think tank, the Institute for Business Value, put on its anthropologist hat and surveyed more than 3,800 consumers in six countries (China, France, Germany, Japan, the UK and the US), compiling our findings in a new study called “Beyond Digital.”

Here’s some of what we uncovered:

  • Four new types of content consumption behaviors (Viewing on Demand, Non-Linear Viewing, Mobile Viewing and Social Consumption) Also known as “time-shifting,” Viewing on Demand is now the norm – especially in  the UK and the U.S. where more than half of the early adopters and mainstream consumers access online video whenever it suits their schedules through sites such as Hulu and Netflix, or via video on demand services through their home TVs.Description: http://asmarterplanet.com/wp-includes/js/tinymce/plugins/wordpress/img/trans.gifThree fourths of the adultswe surveyed are “Non-Linear Viewers,” admitting to surfing the web and texting while watching television. Mobile Viewing is also gaining traction, with more than 50 percent of early adopter and mainstream consumer respondents in Japan, the UK and the U.S. regularly accessing content on their smart phones or other portable devices. Social Consumption is also on the rise: across the global sample, 46 percent fall in this category — using digital content to communicate socially (via Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.).

Media companies need to be able to extract data from all aspects of their business processes – so they have a real-time and more holistic view of what’s actually happening within their business. Information – about operations efficiency, content production and distribution, consumer preference and behavior – needs to be translated into intelligence to help executives make better decisions sooner and get the most out of their resources. I see three core analytics opportunities emerging for media and entertainment companies….

As written by Steve Canepa, general manager, IBM Global Media & Entertainment Industry in his blog post "Top Three Analytics Trends in the “Smarter Media”

Steve Canepa

Aurasma app is augmented reality, augmented | KurzweilAI

Aurasmsa  turns static images or even objects into videos, games, and interactive  experiences. Aim your phone at a building and see a video about that  building. Aim it at a picture in a newspaper and launch an interactive  experience (credit: Autonomy)
Aurasmsa, a new augmented reality app by Autonomy that works with smart phones and tablets, will be available on the  Apple App store next week, with a version for TV stations arriving in a  month.
For a fee, media companies can use Aurasma to relate  printed matter (for example, street posters, newspapers, and magazines)  to compelling video and online content.
For the rest of us, the  service will be free; you can create your own content. A social network  will be built around this, allowing users to follow people whose  multimedia content they like.
Source: New Scientist

Aurasma app is augmented reality, augmented | KurzweilAI

Aurasmsa turns static images or even objects into videos, games, and interactive experiences. Aim your phone at a building and see a video about that building. Aim it at a picture in a newspaper and launch an interactive experience (credit: Autonomy)

Aurasmsa, a new augmented reality app by Autonomy that works with smart phones and tablets, will be available on the Apple App store next week, with a version for TV stations arriving in a month.

For a fee, media companies can use Aurasma to relate printed matter (for example, street posters, newspapers, and magazines) to compelling video and online content.

For the rest of us, the service will be free; you can create your own content. A social network will be built around this, allowing users to follow people whose multimedia content they like.

Source: New Scientist

Electronic sensors give new life to paper

Electronic sensors built into cartons may make it easier to tell when it’s time to toss out funky milk or orange juice. And that’s just the start. At least that’s the goal for researchers working on putting electronics into paper. They’re trying to figure out how to combine the flexibility, low-cost and recyclability of paper with the information-carrying ability of electronics.

Source: Discovery.com

Technology empowers China’s rural workers: a social networking site is linking donors as far afield as London and  California with farmers who seek micro-finance to develop small rural  businesses.   It has profiles of borrowers from Sichuan and Inner Mongolia, and  profiles of contributors from 47 countries who select online which  projects they want to support. In many ways, it is a Facebook for  farmers.

Technology empowers China’s rural workers: a social networking site is linking donors as far afield as London and California with farmers who seek micro-finance to develop small rural businesses. It has profiles of borrowers from Sichuan and Inner Mongolia, and profiles of contributors from 47 countries who select online which projects they want to support. In many ways, it is a Facebook for farmers.

Internet Surpasses Television as Main News Source for Young Adults The Internet is now the main national and international news source for people ages 18 to 29, a study from the Pew Research Center reports.In 2010, 65% of people younger than 30 cited the Internet as their go-to source for news, nearly doubling from 34% in 2007. The  number who consider television as their main news source dropped from  68% to 52% during that time.

Internet Surpasses Television as Main News Source for Young Adults The Internet is now the main national and international news source for people ages 18 to 29, a study from the Pew Research Center reports.In 2010, 65% of people younger than 30 cited the Internet as their go-to source for news, nearly doubling from 34% in 2007. The number who consider television as their main news source dropped from 68% to 52% during that time.

All aboard: Wi-fi arrives on the Tube | Networks
Wireless internet access on the Tube network takes a step forward today as London Underground starts a six-month wi-fi trial at Charing Cross underground station. Wi-fi will be available in the ticket hall and on the Bakerloo and Northern Line platforms. The Mayor pledged to ensure wi-fi coverage across London by 2012.

All aboard: Wi-fi arrives on the Tube | Networks

Wireless internet access on the Tube network takes a step forward today as London Underground starts a six-month wi-fi trial at Charing Cross underground station. Wi-fi will be available in the ticket hall and on the Bakerloo and Northern Line platforms. The Mayor pledged to ensure wi-fi coverage across London by 2012.

Netflix. Meet Hulu. Now, How About Merging Together? | Fast Company
About two-thirds of Netflix’s 15 million customers now use the site’s instant streaming service to watch movies and TV shows on a wide variety of media players, home theaters, Internet-enabled TVs, and game consoles. During the past few months, Netflix has added thousands of new movies and TV episodes to its catalog of streaming titles; in fact, the company estimates that its mail business will peak in 2013, and soon it will spend more on licensing deals than it does on postage.

Netflix. Meet Hulu. Now, How About Merging Together? | Fast Company

About two-thirds of Netflix’s 15 million customers now use the site’s instant streaming service to watch movies and TV shows on a wide variety of media players, home theaters, Internet-enabled TVs, and game consoles. During the past few months, Netflix has added thousands of new movies and TV episodes to its catalog of streaming titles; in fact, the company estimates that its mail business will peak in 2013, and soon it will spend more on licensing deals than it does on postage.

trendd:

I really like the way that they have seamlessly incorporated the interactive elements in this “magazine” demo. And since it’s built in HTML5 it will work on all of the future tablet devices (assuming that they’re HTML5 compliant).

Sports Illustrated Magazine - HTML5 (via thewonderfactoryny)