Samsung and the University of Texas conspire for thought controlled tablets - SlashGear
Electronics giant Samsung is working with researchers at the University of Texas on a project that has to do with providing control of a tablet using brain waves.
Electronics giant Samsung is working with researchers at the University of Texas on a project that has to do with providing control of a tablet using brain waves.

Samsung and the University of Texas conspire for thought controlled tablets - SlashGear

Electronics giant Samsung is working with researchers at the University of Texas on a project that has to do with providing control of a tablet using brain waves.


Electronics giant Samsung is working with researchers at the University of Texas on a project that has to do with providing control of a tablet using brain waves.

Thinking Your Way Through Traffic in a Brain-Control Car 
Source: Wired
BrainDriver uses off-the-shelf parts, including an electroencephalography system designed for gaming, to control an autonomous Volkswagen Passat. The car isn’t very fast, and it responds to only rudimentary  commands, but it brings us one step closer to the day we’re simply  passengers along for the ride in vehicles that drive themselves.
“The whole thing was not done as a real application for today, but as  a ‘technology push,’ as a proof of concept of what technology can  already achieve,” says Raul Rojas, a professor of artificial  intelligence at the Free University of Berlin. “An intriguing question  is how to ‘hybridize’ human and machine, and it was fun to try this with  our car.”

Thinking Your Way Through Traffic in a Brain-Control Car

Source: Wired

BrainDriver uses off-the-shelf parts, including an electroencephalography system designed for gaming, to control an autonomous Volkswagen Passat. The car isn’t very fast, and it responds to only rudimentary commands, but it brings us one step closer to the day we’re simply passengers along for the ride in vehicles that drive themselves.

“The whole thing was not done as a real application for today, but as a ‘technology push,’ as a proof of concept of what technology can already achieve,” says Raul Rojas, a professor of artificial intelligence at the Free University of Berlin. “An intriguing question is how to ‘hybridize’ human and machine, and it was fun to try this with our car.”

UCLA/Caltech researchers help patients move mouse cursors with their brains Researchers were able to show that Earthlings  can “regulate the  activity of their neurons to intentionally alter the  outcome of  stimulation.” In other words, they were able to move a mouse  cursor  with just their mind, and brighten a test image with a 70 percent   success rate.

UCLA/Caltech researchers help patients move mouse cursors with their brains Researchers were able to show that Earthlings can “regulate the activity of their neurons to intentionally alter the outcome of stimulation.” In other words, they were able to move a mouse cursor with just their mind, and brighten a test image with a 70 percent success rate.

whisperoftheshot:

Human Trials Next for Darpa’s Mind-Controlled Artificial Arm 
Pentagon-backed scientists are getting ready to test thought-controlled prosthetic arms on human subjects, by rewiring their brains to fully integrate the artificial limbs.
gizmodo

whisperoftheshot:

Human Trials Next for Darpa’s Mind-Controlled Artificial Arm

Pentagon-backed scientists are getting ready to test thought-controlled prosthetic arms on human subjects, by rewiring their brains to fully integrate the artificial limbs.

gizmodo

Set to debut this week at CES, Mattel’s Mind Flex requires players to concentrate really hard in order to power a fan that’ll float a ball through the hoops. Sure, it’s not nearly as complex as what the other two are proposing, but we could totally see ourselves wearing this headset all day while we work — just to find out how much brain power we’re really using. It’s expected to hit US retail channels later this year for $80, and if we may be so candid, our only wish is that the headset was small enough to hide under a hat. (via Mattel’s Mind Flex teaches kids fake telekinesis - Engadget)

Set to debut this week at CES, Mattel’s Mind Flex requires players to concentrate really hard in order to power a fan that’ll float a ball through the hoops. Sure, it’s not nearly as complex as what the other two are proposing, but we could totally see ourselves wearing this headset all day while we work — just to find out how much brain power we’re really using. It’s expected to hit US retail channels later this year for $80, and if we may be so candid, our only wish is that the headset was small enough to hide under a hat. (via Mattel’s Mind Flex teaches kids fake telekinesis - Engadget)